All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Thu Nov 16, 2006 3:28 am

Greg: I recall back in the early days of cds they used to put an advisory on the jewel case. Something along the lines of the superior cd sound will expose limitations/flaws in the original recording process. Don't know if I still have any of those older cds in my collection.

Stands to reason that if the older cds exposed flaws in the original recording, a high-end playback system/headphones would expose flaws in the cds themselves (even those of today). The better the system, the more noticable the flaws.

I myself have just a mid-priced system. So I don't noctice every little thing. Thank goodness.

Thu Nov 16, 2006 9:19 pm

Does anybody know if Let's Be Friends can be bought in any stores right now in the States? It seems to be totally unavailable. If anybody can get their hands on one for me it would be appreciated. Feel free to PM me.

Fri Dec 08, 2006 8:11 am

Elbo, drop me a line and maybe we can work out something.

I just found "Let's Be Friends" and "You'll Never Walk Alone" for a modest price in a rack with similiar items at my friendly neighborhood K-Mart.

"Almost In Love" and "...Sings Flaming Star" had taken so long to emerge in stores that I had to resort to buying them on-line. The latest batch arrived in stores much quicker.

Sat Dec 09, 2006 7:54 am

deadringer wrote:Well I got these two CD and I can say only one thing. The sound si bloody awful and BOTH CDs are S.H.I.T.

No need for such crap, no matter if you are sentimental or not. The sound is not only "dated" but awful as awful it can be.



Following up on your comments, you are way too dismissive, Deadie, with all due respect. Why do I get the feeling you are barely 30? Did you not grow up with vinyl records at all? Don't you negotiate your way through audience-recorded '70s shows like any other hard-core fan? If so, surely those who have a nostalgia for what were actual original releases don't deserve such nasty dismissiveness.

No CD today sounds as bad as the Lps that for so many of us were beloved even when they were worn out, let alone do they sound as bad as the first generation '80s era CDs. These CDs are (at worst) very acceptable soundwise on most "normal" (non-audiophile) sound systems.

The real key is that the artwork is minimalist (great covers, and not much beyond that) but then for $5.99 here in the US, who's to complain? These are in most cases 20-25 minute time machines of albums released during Elvis' lifetime. It's a cheap thrill but still charming. Good idea and decent execution, BMG.

Sat Dec 09, 2006 8:26 am

I got my copy of You'll Never Walk Alone today... love it!! The cover art and layout are terrific to me if nothing else, but I enjoy these gospel tracks and the title song, always a favorite.

JEFF d
EAP fan

Sat Dec 09, 2006 9:22 am

For us who have the original LP albums of these Camden releases, it's nice to have these CD's. Clear sound, compared to the vinyl, and the playing order of the songs. Ones one got hooked to a LP album, normally I left it playing wihout skipping tracks. Only turned the LP onto the other side.
As such, it's like going back in time, playing the albums again, in the same playing order. Back then, these albums held material not availabale elsewhere and if you check out the RIAA database, you can see that these albums actually did very well!
For those who couldn't care less, forget that these CD's excist.
The tracks are to be found elsewhere. But, if you check out Pier's reviews of these, you'll find that there were several alternate mixes to be found on them. That's also one of the reasons I welcome these novelties.
But, to me it's onlly FS, LBF, AIL and YNWA that I find essential.

Tue Dec 12, 2006 2:04 am

Good choices, but I was also quite taken as a youngster with the songs of "I Got Lucky." Great, but wildly inappropriate cover...!

Image


*********************************************

Nice to see the original cover restored on "You'll Never Walk Alone":

Image
:arrow:

Image

The CD looks just like this but does not have "Camden" written up there. Plus, the "spine" of the CD (with clear plastic) has the album title written-tastefully vertically...

Tue Dec 12, 2006 4:52 am

Well I finally got a copy of Lets Be Friends today! This was always a favorite and the album cover was probably my all time fav for this period of Elvis... anyways I was surpised that this Cd actually even has the Camden logo on it as non of the other reissues have it! :shock:

JEFF d
EAP fan

Tue Dec 12, 2006 5:11 am

JEFF d wrote:Well I finally got a copy of Lets Be Friends today! This was always a favorite and the album cover was probably my all time fav for this period of Elvis... anyways I was surpised that this Cd actually even has the Camden logo on it as non of the other reissues have it! :shock:

JEFF d
EAP fan


Is Mama the short version?

I'm kinda hoping that they will make a stealth reissue of Lets Be Friends with the correct version, like they did with the Almost In Love cd.

So, it would be appreciated if everyone who buys this cd checks it out and lets us know in this thread if they correct it.

Tue Dec 12, 2006 7:18 am

Mama is the short version.

JEFF d
EAP fan

Tue Dec 12, 2006 8:25 am

JEFF d wrote: I was surpised that ("Let's Be Friends") actually even has the Camden logo on it as none of the other reissues have it! :shock:


Good call. I missed that the logo had "returned" on this release. Maybe someone heard us!

It's a pity that this one looks that much more minimalist than even "Almost In Love" and "...Sings Flaming Star..." did recently, which at least had backcovers and inserts that played off the cover art.

"LBF" is even more spartan and doesn't even bother. Oh, well, still neat to have.

JerryNodak wrote:Greg: I recall back in the early days of cds they used to put an advisory on the jewel case. Something along the lines of the superior cd sound will expose limitations/flaws in the original recording process. Don't know if I still have any of those older cds in my collection.

Stands to reason that if the older cds exposed flaws in the original recording, a high-end playback system/headphones would expose flaws in the cds themselves (even those of today). The better the system, the more noticable the flaws.

I myself have just a mid-priced system. So I don't notice every little thing. Thank goodness.


Great point, Jerry and it's true..

I remember this warning and still occasionally see it as I collect other artists from that era or in the case of Elvis, I recently got some of his '80s-era Cds to "upgrade" from the LPs.

I suppose it got a little corny after awhile (including instructions on how to clean it and occasionallya very grave statement like this:

"do not attempt to play this compact digital disc on a regular turntable with a needle" ..... :shock: :lol:

Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:24 pm

Greg: Do you suppose someone would have actually been ill-informed enough to actually attempt playing a cd on a TT with a needle back in the day?

I must admit that's not a warning I had ever run into.

Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:39 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:
"do not attempt to play this compact digital disc on a regular turntable with a needle" ..... :shock: :lol:


So that's where I have been going wrong all these years!!

That warning is right up there with the over the top "caution HOT" warnings on the McDonalds coffee - "hot, really, you're kidding!!"

But then I think somebody did sue them for scalding themselves with the hot beverage :roll:

I might sue BMG for a few replacement needles on my turntable :lol:

Wed Dec 13, 2006 11:58 am

for a little cash you can hear the original orgasmic rubberneckin' mix, the original my little friend mix (much better than 90's one), the original let us pray...you have the mono mixes replaced by the modern stereo mixes (i.e the long stay away, let's forget about the stars). Sometimes the new mixes detract from a rarity (mama) and sometimes the old mixes detract from having complete performances (edited edge of reality and almost in love).

The sound is quite good, as they have mixed songs from various sources and at least the volum level is the same (not as on today ftd, frankie and johnny ftd and harum scarum ftd to name a few).

You end having a mixed product. good sound, original mixes and new mixes, new remastering, original artwork but not complete, nice price...

It is strange that even a subsidiay label releases this kind of product, but don't forget this is the right way to do it in the sense of releasing original albums restored instead of a new xmas compilation... I only wish the main label would take the new is back, something for everybody and his hand in mine sebastian ftd releases and release them with a booklet and even throwing a couple of alternates in....

Thu Dec 14, 2006 8:51 am

Well-stated, Frus...

But regarding:

frus75 wrote: the original orgasmic rubberneckin' mix


Huh? :roll: :oops: :lol:

Thu Dec 14, 2006 2:31 pm

::: Following up on your comments, you are way too dismissive, Deadie, with all due respect. Why do I get the feeling you are barely 30?

- I am several years OVER 30 ...

::: Did you not grow up with vinyl records at all?

- sure and to make it clear, I have basically complete Elvis LP, SP and EP collection "for sentimental reasons" as well as vinyls with OTHER artists. Pls I produced few vinyls too :-).

The quality of recent bad sounding CD re-releases have nothing to do with vinyl vs. CD.

::: Don't you negotiate your way through audience-recorded '70s shows like any other hard-core fan?

- sure but audience tapes are different chapter, impossible to compare to studio or profi-live tapes. We are speaking about STUDIO TRACKS now and these studio recordings /tat are on Camdens/ sound MUCH BETTER on ANY OTHER CD with them, than on recent Camden sh.ts. I feel certain nostalgia sometimes but not due to these CDs ... even if I remember when i played original Camden LPs in late 80s.

::: No CD today sounds as bad as the Lps that for so many of us were beloved even when they were worn out

- well this is not so easy to tell. Many vinyls that I have sound just fantastic. And no, I am no vinyl lover who will try to explain you that vinyl have warmth and feel that no cold digital CD can provide.

::: The real key is that the artwork is minimalist (great covers, and not much beyond that) but then for $5.99 here in the US, who's to complain?

- well then we can expect ALL CAMDENS soon, on CDs, right ? U.S. MALE, DOUBLE DYNAMITE, SEPARATE WAYS etc... happy hunting.

::: Good idea and decent execution, BMG.

- I will say: BMG is trying to milk the cow to the last drop.

Thu Dec 14, 2006 3:22 pm

Moooooooooooooo Mooooooooooooooooo. I grew up a farm kid. I know about milking cows. Mooooooooooooo

Thu Dec 14, 2006 5:32 pm

frus75 wrote:for a little cash you can hear the original orgasmic rubberneckin' mix, the original my little friend mix (much better than 90's one), the original let us pray...you have the mono mixes replaced by the modern stereo mixes (i.e the long stay away, let's forget about the stars). Sometimes the new mixes detract from a rarity (mama) and sometimes the old mixes detract from having complete performances (edited edge of reality and almost in love).

The sound is quite good, as they have mixed songs from various sources and at least the volum level is the same (not as on today ftd, frankie and johnny ftd and harum scarum ftd to name a few).

You end having a mixed product. good sound, original mixes and new mixes, new remastering, original artwork but not complete, nice price...

It is strange that even a subsidiay label releases this kind of product, but don't forget this is the right way to do it in the sense of releasing original albums restored instead of a new xmas compilation... I only wish the main label would take the new is back, something for everybody and his hand in mine sebastian ftd releases and release them with a booklet and even throwing a couple of alternates in....


The worst thing is the mix of "Let´s forget about the stars" on the double features releases of the 90´s, where you hardly can´t hear the piano :evil: . The version on the Let´s be friends LP is the only one I can listen to.

Regards//Björn

Thu Dec 14, 2006 9:26 pm

Deadringer, there's no reason to call them "Camden Sh*ts" or whatever.
It's clear that Camden was a "gateway drug" for many a fan (witness all the fond threads about Camden, mixed in with some valid criticism) on this very board. At least respect the fans here (myself among them) who feel this way.

Anyone could walk up to any number of soundboard live shows and say "what the hell is this doing being released?"

The Camdens, thus far, are albums that were released in his lifetime. Some of the others would not make ANY sense, I agree.

And again, I'm fine with the sound. One of the problems of the audiophile world is that it can make people so laughably picky. It's hard to make any case that these discs sound bad. C'mon!

Thu Dec 14, 2006 11:07 pm

Greg, well I use this word for several reasons. First of all, back in 70s it was real, well, CRAP - show me another BIG ARTIST who had such amount of awful budget albums on the market. Imagine lets say Bowie, Lennon, Dylan or Stones with such cheap LPs... finally also Elvis LAST BIG HIT ended on such 20 minute piece of... no need to re-release it. Speaking about re-releases, I will rather see COMPLETE 10.06.72 Evening show, restored from original multitrack or 21.06.77 show.

Second and main reason is the sound of this CD version. I listened carefully using my reference Sennheiser HD 265 headphones as well as other ones that i am using for my work, HD 250 Linear II. Pls I played it from Alesis monitor speakers which provide very narrow, natural sound. I can only repead what I already wrote. The sound is really bad regarding the source which is originally multitrack STUDIO STUFF, no bloody mono soundboard or even audience tape.

>>> At least respect the fans here (myself among them) who feel this way.

- I have all respect for you, you know this.

>>> Some of the others would not make ANY sense, I agree.

- I guess we will see another couple soon.

>>>. One of the problems of the audiophile world is that it can make people so laughably picky.

- I was not so picky but I like the BEST POSSIBLE SOUND, best possible reagarding the source of course.

Fri Dec 15, 2006 9:20 am

Deadringer, you'll get no argument from me that Elvis released way too many albums in the early '70s. On the main label alone, leftovers were trotted out on LPs like "Now" and " "Love Letters," as Likethebike and Rockin' Rebel have rightfully criticized here many times. Add in the budget Camden LPs, and you had an awful lot of product put out there in slap-dash fashion.

But most of us, it seems to me, realize that there are a lot of "what if's" and "if only" when it comes to Elvis Presley and we prefer, in the case of Camden, recognize the better aspects of the Camden albums.

Outside of a few stinker tunes (take your pick) and some albums that were worse than others, these budget albums were an effective way to pick up tracks that had not been released elsewhere. Quite a few, as was stated above, actually had some redeeming features: "Almost In Love," "Let's Be Friends," among others.

Do you hate '60s movie songs? If so, say so. It seems you don't like the content, and that's your right.

And we've all bemoaned the moronic "Burning Love" album of '72. That's a different animal altogether and probably the worse offender.

If you can obsess over "the best sound" (and I can get into audiophila, as thenexte and JLGB can attest) and want the MSG album redone in better sound, why look down your nose at those who have fond memories of these albums, warts and all? It all works and right now we have almost too many releases, official and unofficial to keep up with. It's a nice problem to have.

Incidentally, many an Elvis album at the time (as was the fashion) did not run all that long. Camdens ran from 20-24 minutes and were budget-priced. 45 rpm records were even shorter, and charged that much less.

"For LP Fans Only" (another early hodgepodge) ran a whopping 23:58; "A Date With Elvis" ran just under an epic 34 minutes...That's just to name two original albums (with no bonus tracks) on CD that I just grabbed.

Really, there's no crime here and given such indulgences as low-fi audience-recorded live shows, and multiple reissues of his hit and Christmas material, often into truly enfuriating collections like "Love, Elvis" and do-overs like "Hitstory," I really don't think your venom adds up to more than just your own apparent dislike of the '60 material and a hope that somehow we can change what happened.

Given all the senseless "new albums," getting worked up over offering CD versions of albums that helped get the likes of many here started on Elvis seems to be a really small threat to the Elvis legacy.

Finally, returning to "the best possible sound," as was said, I'm all for it, but let's not get obsessive over it, which is what often happens when one has extremely high-end systems. Take a step back from the brink and realize that the sound is hardly bad. It's all relative.

These are $5.99 budget items. I'm glad to see them in the racks again, frankly. One could do worse than to stumble upon a song like "Change of Habit" or ""A Little Less Conversation" (the original) or "Edge of Reality," etc.

In the big sheme of things, these reissues are among the least offensive things RCA/Sony/BMG has done in some time.
:wink:

Fri Dec 15, 2006 3:17 pm

Greg- I gotta tell you I grew up with these albums and while they were a gateway album, I don't understand the appeal. I love a lot of stuff from the '60s represented on the Camden label and as a teen even loved much of the running order on Separate Ways. But when RCA came out with class reissues of this stuff, the value of the Camdens sank considerably for me. I already have all this stuff in mostly crsytalline sound and in better, more intelligent, more respectful packaging. Why do I need it in this context? If you have a burner and a scanner you can actually repeat the Camden running order and covers from your collection. But the truth is most people wouldn't want to do that because when people dub CDs they don't usually make a nine song CD. You often claim, not without some justification, that CD lengths are too long and excessive for a proper album listening experience. But even in the '50s and '60s a 20-22 minute album, where these early Camdens clock in, was viewed as a bit of a rip off. Look at the agitation in the Presley organization over It Happened at the World's Fair.

I can understand buying a Camden on LP as a collectible to hang on the wall but I would not want one in my CD collection. They are just another comp and poorly done comps as well. As slapped together as something like Elvis Now is, it doesn't hold a candle to the Camdens.

I would have no problem with this product for the nostalgics except for that it is taking up shelf space that should be preserved for Elvis' genuine artistic legacy which includes stuff like From Elvis in Memphis, Elvis Country and a genuine Viva Las Vegas soundtrack.

Since I mainly talking about new fans, the one thing they do is get some tracks out there outside the 40 established classics that get endlessly recycled.

Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:26 pm

I had discovered Elvis long before the Camden albums. But I love those albums. I'm glad they're releasing/re-releasing them on cd. I want to hear them again as I remember them.

I long to hear I Got Lucky and then What A Wonderful Life. C'mon Everybody followed by Angel. Separate Ways and Sentimental Me. Yes, even Burning Love; Tender Feeling; Am I Ready.

Nostalgia. A wonderful thing!!!

Sure, I've got all these songs and could burn them to cdr, but I don't have the time or patience. Besides, that wouldn't increase Elvis' sales or certifications.

Sun Dec 17, 2006 9:46 am

Speaking of which, taken from Joe Tunzi's ELVIS SESSIONS III, page 516:


Camden LP Title / release date.... :arrow: U.S. RIAA sales Certification

*********************************************************
Singer Presents Elvis Singing Flaming Star...('68 )...... Platinum
Let's Be Friends ('70)............................................ Platinum
Almost In Love ('70)............................................... Gold
Elvis' Christmas Album ('70)................................... 9X Platinum
You'll Never Walk Alone ('71).................................. . 3XPlatinum
C'mon Everybody ('71)............................................ Platinum
I Got Lucky ('71)..................................................... Gold
Elvis Sings Hits From His Movies Vol. 1 ('72).............. .Platinum
Burning Love And His Hits From His Movies Vol. 2 ...2XPlatinum
Separate Ways ('72).................................................Platinum
Double Dynamite (2-LP on Camden/Pickwick, '75).......Platinum
Frankie & Johnny (Camden/Pickwick, '76) ..................Platinum


I'm not sure how being budget albums affects how this is seen (I don't see any asterics in this listing) but like it or not, many Camden records outsold his main line of RCA (full-budget) LPs.

To cite some of those RCA records that went "merely" "GOLD" in the late '60s and '70s: "From Elvis in Memphis," "From Memphis To Vegas/ From Vegas To Memphis," "Elvis-That's the Way It Is," "Elvis In Person At the International Hotel," "Elvis Country," "Elvis Now," "Elvis Recorded Live On Stage in Memphis," "From Elvis Presley Boulevard, Memphis, Tennesee,"...

Interestingly, at the time of this publication, "Elvis 30 #1 Hits" was listed as equaling the certification of Camden's gospel disc "You'll Never Walk Alone," which just was reissued in 2006... :shock: :lol:

I suppose it still sticks in people's craw that "From Elvis In Memphis" " went "gold," but saw it's more shallow but funky and romantic sister "Lets' Be Friends" run off with the popularity contest and all the "platinum." :lol:


likethebike wrote:Greg- I gotta tell you I grew up with these albums and while they were a gateway album, I don't understand the appeal. I love a lot of stuff from the '60s represented on the Camden label and as a teen even loved much of the running order on Separate Ways. But when RCA came out with class reissues of this stuff, the value of the Camdens sank considerably for me. I already have all this stuff in mostly crsytalline sound and in better, more intelligent, more respectful packaging. Why do I need it in this context?



And why do people still gravitate to CD configurations of "Elvis Presley," "Elvis," "Loving You," "King Creole," etc. when they can (more efficently) just listen to the mammoth "King of Rock'n'Roll" '50s box set from 1992? Its not just the improved (thank you, Kevan Budd) sound since '92, but it's that these songs are in this running order, with these familar covers are part of the original, classic experience that we remember and even love. The "Classic Albums" series on FTD continues this dogged loyalty/ obsession with the original Elvis covers and albums.

So, surely, the '50s box -and, for instance, the "[b]From Nashville to Memphis" '60s box[/b]- are more compact (running orders that are extremely long) but do the original albums as collected on "Elvis Is Back," or "Something for Everybody" or "From Elvis in Memphis suddenly become worthless? Not to me.

The best Camdens still maintain that power for some fans, with their extremely brief running orders no more mitigating their enjoy any more than does breaking out an old original 45 rpm single to enjoy the picture sleeve and yes, the original format and sound.

If you have a burner and a scanner you can actually repeat the Camden running order and covers from your collection.



Why do that when for a song you can have the album done from the factory, professionally? The same thing would be true for any other RCA album after you have the decade boxsets.

But the truth is most people wouldn't want to do that because when people dub CDs they don't usually make a nine song CD. You often claim, not without some justification, that CD lengths are too long and excessive for a proper album listening experience.


It's true! The natural running length of many albums (outside of Elvis) was for years between 35-45 minutes, depending on the genre and era.

But that's about all the time anyone needs or can listen to a disc, either then when they had to get up after one side was over and think, "okay, I can play side B another time so I can move onto my other records" or today, when after about 55 minutes or (gasp) 70-some odd minutes, it gets hard to say it's being heard in "one sitting"! Granted, I, too prefer long-running lengths (flesh it out with alternates, etc.) as I also want as much value as I can get, but the first 10 (or 14) songs still represent the core of an "album."

But even in the '50s and '60s a 20-22 minute album, where these early Camdens clock in, was viewed as a bit of a rip off. Look at the agitation in the Presley organization over It Happened at the World's Fair.


They were budget albums, and apparently sold in drug stores and supermarket (as I recall) that normally did not even have a record or tape section. What's so much of a rip-off? I was in high school when I bought a lot of these, working minimum wage jobs, and I really found the value for the money to be just right.

The sales alone show that the price may have been a hook but fans largely kept coming back for them. I had begun to think that the "Burning Love" album was the stinker that killed Camden, but that's not necessarily the case, as incredibly wrong-headed as that set was.

That album was just artificially-pumped by the inclusion of that monster hit, but otherwise, Camden albums sold steadily and even challenged and surpassed regular RCA sales. Artistically, that's largely a nightmare and sums up the woes of his career rather well, but not all Camdens (we can narrow it down) were total junk and certainly the fans (as evidenced even here) did not think so.

I can understand buying a Camden on LP as a collectible to hang on the wall but I would not want one in my CD collection. They are just another comp and poorly done comps as well. As slapped together as something like Elvis Now is, it doesn't hold a candle to the Camdens.


Maybe you like listening to the "Double Feature" sets (and I do and have) but personally (and I guess you had to be there) I'll take hearing "Change of Habit" on "Let's Be Friends" and "Edge of Reality" or "Stay Away" on "Almost In Love" in a heartbeat.

Do you think really Elvis Now is any better than "Almost In Love"? Apparently but that album is hardly loved by me. Maybe I should hang "Elvis Now" on the wall," too. :lol:

I would have no problem with this product for the nostalgics except for that it is taking up shelf space that should be preserved for Elvis' genuine artistic legacy which includes stuff like From Elvis in Memphis, Elvis Country and a genuine Viva Las Vegas soundtrack.


You can't rewrite history, although to Ernst's credit, he did try with releases like "The Lost Album," "Tommorow Is A Long Time," "Burning Love" (1999), the Viva Las Vegas FTD, and, yes, the last edition of the "Double Feature"comps.

But as a fan and enthusiast of any album such as those you cite, you too are also being inefficient (to follow your logic) for not tossing your '99 CD's of "Elvis Is Back" or "From Elvis In Memphis" in the "for sale" pile when, after all, we do have them on the '60s box and the comprehensive "Suspicious Minds" anthology.

So people do care about original titles, running order and cover art, even if they're Elvis' Camden albums that, as Chuck D. might say, "never meant a thing to me." That's why this is a "collector" site : by definition, most of us own way more than should on one artist, especially, some would argue, in the file-swapping download era. (Why have any jewel-cases, they would ask... :lol: )

Since I mainly talking about new fans, the one thing they do is get some tracks out there outside the 40 established classics that get endlessly recycled.


Precisely. True in 1968 and 2006. They are priced as low as $5.99 and as high as $8 but then a fan will also fip by an Elvis "genre" set priced at $18.99 and barely more coherent (By the way, hey, Piers, stop calling these "budget" releases in your reviews..! :lol: .)

So the hook for a casual fan (just as it was over a generation ago) may be to go for the Camden "sampler." So be it. To Elvis' credit, even hodgepodge collections like the Camdens show him singing his heart out even on often lame material. I get more thrown by seeing multiple (and shabby) Hayride "Elvis live" albums in the racks than any Camden. And I got more worked up over truly duplicative discs like the genre, gospel, love song and Christmas sets. In that way, we are both looking for things to get upset about... :lol:

Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:56 am

The reasons the Camdens outsold the classic albums was because they were cheap and available in outlets beside music stores.

25 minutes is just too short. Give me a half hour at least.

I never bought any redundant individual titles after the boxes came out unless there were alternate takes. So that is a little alien to me. The exceptions were Elvis' Golden Records Vol. 3 and the Gold CD remaster of Elvis is Back and I only picked them up because I got them for next to nothing. I never understood the frenzy for the Beatles' American albums either.

Having a Viva Las Vegas or a Burning Love album is not rewriting history. It's giving the fans good, popular material in a proper context. Viva Las Vegas is one of Elvis' most popular movies run with great frequency on television and it has a very solid soundtrack. Just the kind of stuff that has a pull outside the fanatic fan base. However, if you decide after watching this movie on TV that you want the album, there's nothing for you. It's a turn off.

As for quality, I just don't think any Elvis studio album equals the depths of Let's Be Friends which outside of "Change of Habit" and "I'll Be There" is filled with cringe inducing material.

Something like the remastered Elvis Presley, Elvis, Elvis is Back, From Elvis in Memphis, Elvis Country and a few other original albums along with well chosen comps, give fans an opportunity to collect Elvis an album at a time and present his best work in the best possible light.

That's something a just tossed together comp like the Camdens can't do IMO. I'm not saying that there weren't good performances on these albums. Almost in Love, C'mon Everybody, Separate Ways and You'll Never Walk all have strong if inconsistent bodies of songs. But how are they different from Always on My Mind, Rocker, Reconsider Baby, Return of the Rocker, Love Songs, Elvis' Greatest Hits, Pure Gold etc. etc.? Many of these were bargain priced at one time and many of which provided fans of different eras an introduction to Elvis. If they were re-released I'd have a tough time getting excited about them as well.