All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Mon Sep 25, 2006 3:12 pm

TJ wrote:
Steve Morse wrote:It will surprise a good many people that "Elvis-in-jumpsuit" does not always mean "fat Elvis".

Steve Morse


I wouldn't bank on it mate. People tend to suffer visual impairment as soon as Elvis puts a jumpsuit on. I've known people talking about watching fat Elvis in That's the Way It Is.


Ditto.

Mon Sep 25, 2006 3:18 pm

Cryogenic wrote:
TJ wrote:
Steve Morse wrote:It will surprise a good many people that "Elvis-in-jumpsuit" does not always mean "fat Elvis".

Steve Morse


I wouldn't bank on it mate. People tend to suffer visual impairment as soon as Elvis puts a jumpsuit on. I've known people talking about watching fat Elvis in That's the Way It Is.


Ditto.


I know, it's all perception. The man looked like an Adonis for TTWII, yet he's perceived to be heavy by a lot of people who've seen bits and pieces of it. Of course what would you expect from a world which voted Harry Hamlin as the most beautiful person in the world.

Mon Sep 25, 2006 4:24 pm

Harry's the missing link from ape to man.

Catch him on "Dancing With The Stars"?
White man can't dance! :D

Mon Sep 25, 2006 4:29 pm

Joe Car wrote:I know, it's all perception. The man looked like an Adonis for TTWII, yet he's perceived to be heavy by a lot of people who've seen bits and pieces of it. Of course what would you expect from a world which voted Harry Hamlin as the most beautiful person in the world.


My own perception was that Elvis was slightly bloated in the face when I saw the first bits and pieces of TTWII. It's true that he's not as slim as Vegas '69 or even the Comeback Special in '68. Over time, however, and when I watched the whole thing, I realised my perception was off. But it's a weird thing. I guess the stigma of jumpsuits -- and, perhaps, to some extent, their design -- works against him.

Mon Sep 25, 2006 5:40 pm

TJ wrote:I wouldn't bank on it mate. People tend to suffer visual impairment as soon as Elvis puts a jumpsuit on. I've known people talking about watching fat Elvis in That's the Way It Is.


I remember when Aloha was broadcast on TV a couple of years back, and people in my office were saying it was sad how Elvis was so fat!! Visual impairment indeed!!!

Mon Sep 25, 2006 6:58 pm

Cryogenic wrote:
Joe Car wrote:I know, it's all perception. The man looked like an Adonis for TTWII, yet he's perceived to be heavy by a lot of people who've seen bits and pieces of it. Of course what would you expect from a world which voted Harry Hamlin as the most beautiful person in the world.


My own perception was that Elvis was slightly bloated in the face when I saw the first bits and pieces of TTWII. It's true that he's not as slim as Vegas '69 or even the Comeback Special in '68. Over time, however, and when I watched the whole thing, I realised my perception was off. But it's a weird thing. I guess the stigma of jumpsuits -- and, perhaps, to some extent, their design -- works against him.


Probably the hair and larger sideburns play a role too. It makes him look just a little fatter in the face, but he was of course skinny as a rake.

Tue Sep 26, 2006 12:45 am

[quote="TJ"]

Probably the hair and larger sideburns play a role too. It makes him look just a little fatter in the face, but he was of course skinny as a rake.[/quote

That's true !!!!

The extremely flared trousers don't help either,especially the Aloha suit.

They make his legs look shorter,fatter.

I too,have had somebody describe "Elvis's last concert" where he "walked through the audience" and how "Fat" he was !!! of course they were watching TTWII.

It must be a combination if the Hair,Sideburns,the Jumpsuit,and the MEDIA.

Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:10 am

Elvis did look good in the add better than he did for On Tour and New York etc.

They sure did that Kieth Moon part good but>>...

I like and admire Ronnie Tutt and it amazes me that Tutt makes Keith Moon look old fashoined insomuch as Ronnie Tutt is like the epitamy of the modern Rock drummer/Big @ss Arena Rock drummer--his kit is just spot on and so is his playing.

Hand picked by "E" over the best Motown had to offer too.

This is another great thing about The King you can see the progression as an artist--in the 60's Elvis worked with the best of the best including Hal Blaine and again imo Hal Blaine is not the modern day rock drummer that Tutt is.

I feel the same regarding Jerry Scheff what a cool dude and again a modern bass wizard--Jim Morrison saw the band in Nov 70 you know the rest--Elvis inspired so many after they saw him do his thing in the 50's Hendrix was inspired after seeing Presley in concert in 57.

All this stuff needs including in the Anthology and Elvis needs to start getting the respect that he currently isnt getting--

Now back to that add i hated the sight of that twat Noel Gallagher.... :D

Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:13 am

Cryogenic wrote:It's verging on a parody, though.

Anyway, any video that includes that girl at 0:34 is alright by me. MMMMMM.... :lol:


Who is that girl?

Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:31 am

I guess the mind has a way of filtering what people are actually seeing. If you've green enough to have absorbed the moronic jumpsuited impersonator versions of "Elvis," this will act a filter in how some novices view any '70s Elvis footage. Play enough of it, and I dare say we'd have some converts.

I have to say that while both pieces are novel (and I've heard far worse impersonations), but it is also annoyingly trivial, the more I think about it.

If one respects the fact that Elvis handpicked his band members as "custom" soldiers in his sound, and actually did not want anyone but Ronnie Tutt, James Burton, etc., then these other stars serve to detract more than anything else.

jI didn't get a great thrill about seeing any of these acts "backing" Elvis and I can imagine that in the USA, it would only induce the usual howls of protest and even indigation from fans of Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder, who for African-American audiences, can rival or equal Elvis as cultural royalty. I'm glad this isn't shown in the US, come to think of it...!

As it is, more "duet" and "all-star" collaborations often prove that the best stars and performers stand alone and don't need that kind of help...

Tue Sep 26, 2006 8:34 am

TJ wrote:
Cryogenic wrote:
Joe Car wrote:I know, it's all perception. The man looked like an Adonis for TTWII, yet he's perceived to be heavy by a lot of people who've seen bits and pieces of it. Of course what would you expect from a world which voted Harry Hamlin as the most beautiful person in the world.


My own perception was that Elvis was slightly bloated in the face when I saw the first bits and pieces of TTWII. It's true that he's not as slim as Vegas '69 or even the Comeback Special in '68. Over time, however, and when I watched the whole thing, I realised my perception was off. But it's a weird thing. I guess the stigma of jumpsuits -- and, perhaps, to some extent, their design -- works against him.


Probably the hair and larger sideburns play a role too. It makes him look just a little fatter in the face, but he was of course skinny as a rake.


Good point. Even Guralnick was duped by his appearance in the Aloha concert.

Mike C wrote:
Cryogenic wrote:It's verging on a parody, though.

Anyway, any video that includes that girl at 0:34 is alright by me. MMMMMM....


Who is that girl?


Who knows? She's just very cute.

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:If one respects the fact that Elvis handpicked his band members as "custom" soldiers in his sound, and actually did not want anyone but Ronnie Tutt, James Burton, etc., then these other stars serve to detract more than anything else.


Good point. I'm not sure Elvis would have thought highly of Noel Gallagher (though I'm a fan) or The Sugababes, either.

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:I didn't get a great thrill about seeing any of these acts "backing" Elvis and I can imagine that in the USA, it would only induce the usual howls of protest and even indigation from fans of Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder, who for African-American audiences, can rival or equal Elvis as cultural royalty. I'm glad this isn't shown in the US, come to think of it...!


That's another good point. A damn good one! I hadn't actually stopped to think about that till now. You are 100% correct. They're all subservient to Elvis, aren't they? It could easily be found insulting -- and with just cause -- by some. I'm sure it was done with the best of intentions, but when you get right down to it, the entire concept, and execution (i.e. Elvis' voice), is heavily flawed.

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:As it is, more "duet" and "all-star" collaborations often prove that the best stars and performers stand alone and don't need that kind of help...


Yet another good point. Even though they all did 'em one way or another, people like Marvin Gaye, Frank Sinatra and Elvis Presley were really too big for duets.

Tue Sep 26, 2006 2:59 pm

Whilst I respect the various points made, and the posters who have made them, isn't this all getting a bit heavy ?

The advert just brings a big smile to my face, because it puts Elvis in the public eye. The BBC are making heavy use of it.

I managed to get it onto DVD-RW last night (just before the 10.00 p.m. news). It was also featured again this morning (just before 9.00, I think).

I have watched it a considerable number of times and it's very well done, with the backgrounds consistent (those big coloured circles). I still think the voice is as close as any I've heard - in fact, to me, it sounds like Elvis.

It's not made for the Academy Awards. Just enjoy it, folks !

Steve Morse

Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:37 pm

Cryogenic wrote:Nice editing and I appreciate the effort -- but that voice! Ugh. I can take Elvis off far better than that. I'm sure many of us can. But, when it comes to the crunch, save for ol' Kurty Wurty, I don't think there are many that can professionally do it. Where is the BASS in this guy's voice? I can beat him on that alone. We shouldn't expect great things from the Beeb when it comes to Elvis, though. Remember the impersonator during EPE's "Number 1's" re-release campaign? Cripes. They just don't get it, do they?


Sweet that some of you guys actually try to speak like Elvis. Next time they ought to ask Kurt, he might not even ask for money. Or he could give lessons. The commercial is respectful. Of course the voice is up to debate. Because we are all so used to Elvis voice, it's difficult to adjust. And I don't want to do that. It's like Quentin Tarantino said "Only Elvis can play Elvis." No question this voice is serious and not really a parody. Rhys-Myers was way worse. That was torture. I must admit the Cartoon Network's Johnny Bravo always gives me a chuckle. The essence is there. LOL But it's wonderful that an even greater audience gets to see it on YouTube now and I don't think the general public worries much about the voice. Thus far all the comments about pretty much all the clips have been positive and not all of those are fans. The Japanese effort is more fun though. Sadly I have heard the same comments regarding Elvis and TWWII, Aloha and fat. I agree that on first glance he looks a little bit chubby in Hawaii, but that's a wrong impression. But TWWII??? WTF??? I mean do some people want that he looks anorexic???

Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:26 pm

Hmm Marvin Gaye "e" on end for respect-he added it himself.

Anyways some of his best records biggest hits were duetts with Tammi Terril and Diana Ross etc anyway i get your point.

Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:41 pm

Marvin Gaye i noticed whilst listening to his track "Let's Get It On" he has developed his own unique style with his singing--or rather it's more prominent on this track--sort of lispy type phrasing.

This reminds me of Elvis the way he phrases the lyrics in "Treat Me Nice"he bends his voice sorta -the version that is different on the single--you know--Elvis sings several takes and he sings them normally then he does that thing with his voice on others.

Then i noticed this on "Let Us Pray" i have heard different versions where he sings it straight and normal then i read that he whent back in the studio to redo it and then the film version he does that thing with his voice.

Point is artists like Marvin Gaye allways sang the same way but Elvis had the abillity to change his voice also we got the vocal differences as his voice matured.

I agree the public think that in that advert most of it is Elvis voice-Shame the public in all honesty they just do not realise all this about Elvis singing abillity either.

Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:26 am

that's a cool ad.
The voice may not be exact but, as we all know, Elvis isn't around to do voice-overs.
Let's enjoy the publicity it attracts
rick

Wed Sep 27, 2006 8:21 am

Cryo, nice to know we continue to agree on at least some things. I'm not all that surprised. :lol:


Steve Morse wrote:Whilst I respect the various points made, and the posters who have made them, isn't this all getting a bit heavy ?

The advert just brings a big smile to my face, because it puts Elvis in the public eye....


Sure, i'd probably smile if it came on, just because at this point Elvis truly is not as visible as he once was. If it wasn't for the fact that I'm the "D.J.", I'd not hear him coming out of my radio or TV much these days...!

But I brought these points up not to be a party pooper, but just to reflect briefly on how this stuff is perceived outside of Elvis fandom. All the "King" stuff and the "media overload" as one book put it in some ways made Elvis an attractive target for those who were either on the fence or just against him. I'm wary of "over-selling" our boy, that's all. :wink: