All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Felton Jarvis' No. 1 Crime

Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:44 am

Releasing an absolutely horrible verison of "Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain", concerning it was such a great jam (available on "Jungleroom Sessions).

Re: Felton Jarvis' No. 1 Crime

Mon Sep 11, 2006 2:12 am

Thomas wrote:Releasing an absolutely horrible verison of "Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain", concerning it was such a great jam (available on "Jungleroom Sessions).

If you're going to nail Felton for some of his release selections, those Elvis told him to keep in the can or which Jarvis knew were unfinished and substandard go ahead of your pick:

"Love Me, Love The Life I Lead"
"Hey Jude"

If you're talking about the 1976 Graceland sessions, it's shameful Jarvis ever let a pathetic recording like "I'll Never Fall In Love Again" be heard by the public. Elvis sounds awful.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 2:47 am

his biggest crime was putting the fake fade out on Suspicious Minds.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 3:12 am

So far your all wrong!!!! :P



:wink:

Mon Sep 11, 2006 3:31 am

That fade in, fade out ending is one of the transcendent moments in rock and soul history.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 3:47 am

likethebike wrote:That fade in, fade out ending is one of the transcendent moments in rock and soul history.


Yeah, agreed. It's a song's landmark.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 4:16 am

Fade out fade in fade out is/was cool and that one goes to Felton. The DJs went nuts and to this day can fool people thinking it is over and he's BACK!! :lol:

Mon Sep 11, 2006 6:05 am

I love the "fade out, fade in" on Suspicious Minds.
Every time my 2 year old hears it he says, "Oooh again!"
Great work Felton.....

Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:33 am

likethebike wrote:That fade in, fade out ending is one of the transcendent moments in rock and soul history.

Perhaps, but it almost killed it for radio airplay.

In addition, the overdubbed horns and "bump and fade" created that August were not what Chips and Elvis finished in Memphis by March 1969. To some, it came off as a big "f*ck you" to Moman and American Studios from Felton and the old guard in the Elvis camp.

Regardless, "Suspicious Minds" is hardly Felton's darkest hour. See my previous post for examples of that.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 12:23 pm

Suspicious minds was, and still is, a brilliant song

But i have to disagree with 'I'll never fall in love again'. That last note he holds at the end almost explodes in emotion. Brings absolute chills up my spine, and makes you believe what he's singing, as he did with every song he ever cared for

Mon Sep 11, 2006 12:44 pm

Without Jarvis' insistance, there would likely have been no Jungle Room Sessions. This + is much bigger than the occasional - for bombastic overdubbing here and there. Ernst, if you read this: we need all undubbed versions of the 70s in a big box!

Re: Felton Jarvis' No. 1 Crime

Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:06 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:If you're talking about the 1976 Graceland sessions, it's shameful Jarvis ever let a pathetic recording like "I'll Never Fall In Love Again" be heard by the public. Elvis sounds awful.


Have you heard the Our Memories Pure version of this song??

Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:08 pm

Felton Jarvis' greatest crime ?

Marrying that tape-burning wife of his.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:42 pm

Let's also give him credit where credit is due. The finished version of Unchained Melody on the Moody Blue album is much better than the raw version you hear on the Spring Tours '77 FTD.

Where Elvis leaves off and Sherrill begins is awful on the latter.
Last edited by Rob on Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:47 pm

::: his biggest crime was putting the fake fade out on Suspicious Minds.

- agree. I had discussion about this fade out-in with Chips Moman 2 years ago... he also disliked this very much but it was out of his control.

Crime... I guess the concept (or non-existing concept) of several albums in 70s is a crime. "FOOL", LOVE LETTERS, ELVIS NOW are all awful albums. And i am not speaking about camdens like BURNING LOVE AND OTHER S**TS....

Doc: there is NOTHING PATHETIC in I'll never fall in love again. This is actually great song with specific mood and Elvis vocal is solid. I like Tom Jones version better but Elvis did good job too. There are worse (but also better) tracks among JR 76 recordings.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:49 pm

Felton Jarvis' greatest crime ?

Marrying that tape-burning wife of his.

- I guess the story about "Adolph Hitler-like" Felton Jarvis wife burning Elvis tapes in her garden barbecue is pure deleted - see guidelines #2

Re: Felton Jarvis' No. 1 Crime

Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:21 pm

Thomas wrote:Releasing an absolutely horrible verison of "Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain", concerning it was such a great jam (available on "Jungleroom Sessions).


A lot of the overdubs on the cuts that finally emerged from the Graceland sessions are AWFUL. The songs are significantly better without them. "I'll Never Fall In Love Again", as the Doc has said, is pathetic. Unlike DJC, though, memory serves that Elvis' vocal is impassioned, if wobbly, but those overdubs drench the song in excessive pathos, and the vocal itself suddenly seems equally ridiculous. That's the key problem there and with several of the other numbers, I think (if, albeit, not the only problem). It's funny: as Elvis got worse, so did Felton. I dare say there's a direct link -- i.e. Jarvis going to greater and greater lengths to "disguise" a weaker and weaker Elvis. Notice how I put "disguise" in quotation marks? The vocals didn't and don't need disguising -- for better or worse, they ARE Elvis. That was and is his forte, whatever the period, and no matter how bad he got (and sadly, he did). I think Jarvis had to affirm his own existence by tampering needlessly, making things worse for everyone, kinda like the loud kid in the classroom.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:29 pm

deadringer wrote:Doc: there is NOTHING PATHETIC in I'll never fall in love again ...

Sure, just like there is NOTHING PATHETIC in your postings.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:41 pm

I think Jarvis' greatest crime was not properly mixing Elvis Lps and singles for release - it often seems as if he did it happhazardly, unlike Chips Moman's work or the work of George Martin with the Beatles.

The other thing I falter Jarvis for is not standing up to Elvis more and challenging the material he was seeking to record. I know there was a lot of politics involved, but he could have done more to break Elvis out of his penchant mid-tempo ballads near the end.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 7:48 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
deadringer wrote:Doc: there is NOTHING PATHETIC in I'll never fall in love again ...

Sure, just like there is NOTHING PATHETIC in your postings.


Doc: I don't know if you saw my post? Have you listened to the song without overdubbs as featured on Our Memories Vol 1 & 2. I do not like the Boulevard album but without overdubbs it is very acceptable IMHO.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 9:03 pm

Fade out on Sus Minds ?

what fade out ? The only time that was released whilst Elvis was around was as a single (and the sales didnt seem like people disliked it) and the only LP it appeared on was Worldwide 50 Hits.

All other releases of that song during Elvis' lifetime didn't have the fade out, in, out again.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:00 pm

Scott Haigh 781990EP wrote:But i have to disagree with 'I'll never fall in love again'.

You like Elvis' voice at its worst, I prefer it at its best. Or you cannot discern the difference. To each their own.

LesterB wrote:Doc: I don't know if you saw my post? Have you listened to the song without overdubbs as featured on Our Memories Vol 1 & 2.

Yes, I did -- it's on the first volume. Hearing that vocal "uncovered" is perhaps a worse experience. It should never have been considered a master take, and Felton is partly to blame. Clearly, there was a desperation for tracks to fill an LP.

But don't take my word for it -- ask Ernst Jørgensen what he thinks of "I'll Never Fall In Love Again." He works for BMG. It's so great he couldn't find a place for it on a five CD box set focusing on Elvis' 1970s recordings.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:47 pm

Steve_M wrote:Fade out on Sus Minds ?

what fade out ? The only time that was released whilst Elvis was around was as a single (and the sales didnt seem like people disliked it) and the only LP it appeared on was Worldwide 50 Hits.

All other releases of that song during Elvis' lifetime didn't have the fade out, in, out again.
And it had a fade out fade in fade out... now I get it !1 re edit!! :lol: :lol:

Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:53 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
likethebike wrote:That fade in, fade out ending is one of the transcendent moments in rock and soul history.

Perhaps, but it almost killed it for radio airplay.
Same thing about radio airplay on The Beatles' HEY JUDE about 4 minutes too long out of almost 7....So that is not a negative on SM Imo.

Mon Sep 11, 2006 11:10 pm

JLGB wrote:Same thing about radio airplay on The Beatles' HEY JUDE about 4 minutes too long out of almost 7....So that is not a negative on SM Imo.

No, you're comparing two different things.

In 1969 Felton put a "bump and fade" on "Suspicious Minds," which initially screwed up DJs who were not expecting it. The Beatles single of "Hey Jude" -- all 7:13 of it -- played out an extended coda of several minutes, but it did not fade out and then return.

As the top single of 1968 -- and one of the biggest of their career -- this innovative coda was an attraction, not a detriment.