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Aloha Comments

Wed Jul 12, 2006 6:49 pm

Good night!! Thanks for all the responses--extremely illuminating!

In reading these comments several things strike me: 1) I have little knowledge about his use of drugs, legal or otherwise; but I am interested in knowing how it was “established” that he was “clean.” Did Elvis allow all relevant sets of testing to be done? Had he or those around him figured out how to mask drug-use in order to test as clean? At this time in his life did his drug-use center on barbiturates (because he looks sedated to a degree)?
2) I agree that, at some level, I find all of his concerts interesting or intriguing, but it seems to me that this “performance” is not anywhere close to being one of his most stellar ones. (Unless, of course, one is applying standards based upon utter relativity. So, we might have top-notch technical shows, superb vocal shows, shows with intensity of movement and presence, etc. This, if followed out logically, could easily lead to the proposition that all shows are of equal merit, or maybe that there were no weaker shows. Such a move seems incoherent to me.) In any case, I agree that the momentousness of the occasion could have led him to experience more anxiety than usual and, thus, to a more restrained performance.
3) The point regarding the lights being on is excellent! I truly dislike this aspect of this show. (I, in fact, dislike intense lighting in general.) It does seem to me that this limits the possibility of the show feeling intimate. It is, after all, a musical performance, not an exhibit hall or doctor’s office.
4) Did Elvis ever reveal how he felt about the Aloha experience in retrospect?

Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:00 pm

JYM wrote:...Elvis at his worst will beat any of the Beatle vocally...


Not the first time I've heard that, but it's still--and always will be-- incorrect. Elvis at his best was the best-ever, but at his worst he was not very good. Hell, anyone at their worst is not very good.

From a performance standpoint, "Aloha" was unlike most Elvis live shows; but we need to remember that that event was unlike any other. All this talk about whether the show was "perfect" or not is silly and irrelevant. One man's trash is another man's treasure (I just made that up!). I have my favorite performances from the show--"Big Hunk," "C.C. Rider," and a few others, but what I see when I see that show is a man in total control of his audience, which is unbelievable, given the size and scope of it.

Imagine the pressure Elvis must have felt prior to taking the stage. Most people struggle to address their co-workers in an office setting.

I remember very subtle things about the "Aloha" show the first time I saw it. The way he looked when he stepped onto the stage, for one. Nobody could look that cool! He dripped charisma, yet he still had that boyish innocence which made you feel like he was your friend. He always had that.

Was it a great show? Not really. But it was a great event.

Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:08 pm

"ColinB" wrote:

Don't forget we're talking about music, which is one of the arts.

In the world of art, imperfections can make things 'perfect' !

It's all subjective.

Well said!

jeanno wrote:About the highlights of the show, nobody mentioned I´M SO LONESOME I COULD CRY. That was an outstanding performance. Apart from that, there were inspired and less inspired performances. This is not by any way EP best show but,at least, it was a triumph.


Kylan mentioned it, as did I when I quoted him on some of the knock-out performances...

Joe Car wrote:Reading this thread is like being in the twilight zone, I really can't believe what's being said. First there are the " bloated" comments", are you people fricking blind? How many classic photo's and portraits have we seen over the years from this show, too numerous to mention I dare say. Then his eyes were "glossy", again, what show were you people watching! Here's a guy who put on more great and memorable performances on TV that any performer that ever lived and under extreme pressure situations, because when EP appeared on TV, it was an event. From Berle, through the Sullivan shows, through the ridiculous Steve Allen show, then the comeback at Sinatra, then again the 68 special, ( the greatest performance in rock & roll history ) he then is asked to perform under the biggest stakes imaginable, a world-wide telecast done for the first time and knocks them dead, never mind the restictions, never mind that he had no margin for error. We fans have become really a--holes and unfair to Elvis and his legacy. The guy had to look perfect, sing perfect, dance, move and groove and speak perfect (even though he was prone to stutter a bit, even as a young man) or he gets critized. He wasn't a machine for phuck sakes and he wasn't God.


Also very well said. We can dissect the show to death, but the total impact was mind-blowing. This "glass half-empty crowd" really starts to get carried away. You'll notice that those who most pull it apart (Cryogenic, Scott Haigh, etc. ) are also quite young (under 25, correct?) and grew up with the luxury of repeating a video or DVD, studying it! The rest of us either saw it live or on occasional re-broadcasts on network tv when it was an event! Back then (pre-52 channels on cable, pre-VH-1, etc), you got what the tube put out. In the case of Elvis, outside of his movies in theaters or re-run on TV, this was the first time many had seen the King in action since '68. I say it was a total triumph, with a few demerits easily overlooked.

Perpective, people!

Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:28 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:"ColinB" wrote:

Don't forget we're talking about music, which is one of the arts.

In the world of art, imperfections can make things 'perfect' !

It's all subjective.

Well said!

jeanno wrote:About the highlights of the show, nobody mentioned I´M SO LONESOME I COULD CRY. That was an outstanding performance. Apart from that, there were inspired and less inspired performances. This is not by any way EP best show but,at least, it was a triumph.


Kylan mentioned it, as did I when I quoted him on some of the knock-out performances...

Joe Car wrote:Reading this thread is like being in the twilight zone, I really can't believe what's being said. First there are the " bloated" comments", are you people fricking blind? How many classic photo's and portraits have we seen over the years from this show, too numerous to mention I dare say. Then his eyes were "glossy", again, what show were you people watching! Here's a guy who put on more great and memorable performances on TV that any performer that ever lived and under extreme pressure situations, because when EP appeared on TV, it was an event. From Berle, through the Sullivan shows, through the ridiculous Steve Allen show, then the comeback at Sinatra, then again the 68 special, ( the greatest performance in rock & roll history ) he then is asked to perform under the biggest stakes imaginable, a world-wide telecast done for the first time and knocks them dead, never mind the restictions, never mind that he had no margin for error. We fans have become really a--holes and unfair to Elvis and his legacy. The guy had to look perfect, sing perfect, dance, move and groove and speak perfect (even though he was prone to stutter a bit, even as a young man) or he gets critized. He wasn't a machine for phuck sakes and he wasn't God.


Also very well said. We can dissect the show to death, but the total impact was mind-blowing. This "glass half-empty crowd" really starts to get carried away. You'll notice that those who most pull it apart (Cryogenic, Scott Haigh, etc. ) are also quite young (under 25, correct?) and grew up with the luxury of repeating a video or DVD, studying it! The rest of us either saw it live or on occasional re-broadcasts on network tv when it was an event! Back then (pre-52 channels on cable, pre-VH-1, etc), you got what the tube put out. In the case of Elvis, outside of his movies in theaters or re-run on TV, this was the first time many had seen the King in action since '68. I say it was a total triumph, with a few demerits easily overlooked.

Perpective, people!


Someone better equipped can probably assist me with this, but I do seem to remember reading contempary reviews which had many of the same criticisms..... that said, The Aloha show is one of my all time faves from the king and I still frequently watch the deluxe Aloha DVD.

Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:38 pm

New Jersey Mike wrote:Someone better equipped can probably assist me with this, but I do seem to remember reading contempary reviews which had many of the same criticisms..... that said, The Aloha show is one of my all time faves from the king and I still frequently watch the deluxe Aloha DVD.


I'd like to see that. I don't expect either the critics (NY Times? Rolling Stone? Variety?) to have over-come their sniping about Elvis even by '73, but I go on what regular people seemed to say then and since then.

Any "evidence" of such anti-Aloha criticism is welcome.

Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:42 pm

KHoots wrote:Was it a great show? Not really. But it was a great event.


I'll go with that.

It seems that when one makes a negative comment or two, one is labelled a "basher", and when one makes a positive comment or two, one is labelled a "gusher" (whether literally or in coded form). But life is infinitely more subtle than that. The fact of the matter is that there is good and bad to every human endeavour -- Elvis and the performance he gave during the "Aloha" concert are no different.

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Perpective, people!


There is ample "perpective" here.

In fact, it's precisely because we no longer have such a limited view of Elvis, but rather, have access to an enormous catalogue of material -- full-bodied DVDs, CDs with outtakes etc -- as well as various interviews, articles and publications, that we are able to look upon things in a different light. Personally speaking, I still don't understand the "bloated" comment, and probably never will, but when aspects of the "Aloha" concert are compared to other shows, and seen through the context of Elvis' drug problem and psychological state, it clearly has a mixture of merits and flaws. It becomes very tedious when people like yourself go on the defensive and come out with macroscopic observations that we probably all agree with, but in doing so, cheapen and obfuscate the microscopic observations that every fan is well within their rights to make and explore, and indeed, are a vital part of discourse if appreciation of Elvis and his musical legacy is to continue.

Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:46 pm

I generally agree, but "people like myself" are only asking folks not to over-state the case.

I agree that this forum is designed for us to "indulge" with our observations.

I dare say such excercises themselves run the risk of totally clouding our enjoyment of such legendary programs in the name of "analysis."

Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:47 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:
New Jersey Mike wrote:Someone better equipped can probably assist me with this, but I do seem to remember reading contempary reviews which had many of the same criticisms..... that said, The Aloha show is one of my all time faves from the king and I still frequently watch the deluxe Aloha DVD.


I'd like to see that. I don't expect either the critics (NY Times? Rolling Stone? Variety?) to have over-come their sniping about Elvis even by '73, but I go on what regular people seemed to say then and since then.

Any "evidence" of such anti-Aloha criticism is welcome.


Here's one....and this might not count since this is the Rolling Stone review of the Album...NOT the TV special.

http://www.superseventies.com/sppresleyelvis3.html

Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:54 pm

Thanks, NJ Mike.

I'm going to take off the gloves on this review by Jon Landau back in '73 that you posted a link to...Most of us know him for that great piece he did on Elvis in Boston '71, as well as his later Springsteen connection.

Here is his absurd Rolling Stone dis of Aloha, with my comments added in red. :lol:

Re:

Aloha From Hawaii Via Satellite
Elvis Presley
RCA 6089
Released: February 1973
Chart Peak: #1
Weeks Charted: 52
Certified Double Platinum: 5/20/88

My God! Another live album from my hero. He's turning them out as fast as he once made movie soundtracks. And with as little point, in view of the fact that the material, pattern, structure and sound vary so little from record to record. On the other hand, they sell better than his current studio albums, and those haven't exactly been aesthetic triumphs, so maybe there is some logic to it.

Just the same, "Suspicious Minds" has been released live from Las Vegas, Madison Square Garden and Hawaii and not one of these versions comes close to the sheer artistry of the Memphis studio original.

The live "Burning Love" is a mockery of Elvis' best single since "Suspicious Minds." (Mockery? What an exageration.- GN)

The "American Trilogy," El's version of Mickey Newbury's simple but effective blending of "Dixie," "All My Trials" and "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" doesn't generate anything near the power of actually seeing him do it. (overstated, methinks...)

In the enjoyable documentary Elvis On Tour he turns his performance into a visual drama. By contrast, the live recording magnifies the worst element of Elvis' stage show -- the simplistic horn arrangements, poorly performed -- while the film magnifies the depth of Elvis' commitment to the music. (Nonsense about the horns, the performers...)

I usually enjoy hearing him do the ballad staples he became identified with during the movie phase, especially the by-now haunting "Can't Help Falling in Love," with which he closes each concert (and here given its worst recording yet). But when he strays into the pure Caesar's Palace repertory that includes "What Now My Love," "You Gave Me a Mountain," and "My Way," depression crosses over the line into disgust. Typical baby-boomer angst about getting old: thank god Elvis did this music.


As usual, Elvis tries his hand with some recently popular chart material; thus, a mediocre "Something," (oh sure!) and a bloated "Steamroller Blues, (you're hopeless, Landau) " only partially salvaged by some elegant James Burton lead guitar. The band is impersonal but astoundingly tight and professional throughout.

Charlie Gillett once noted that in his early records Elvis sang at the top of his vocal range but that soon after the move to RCA he started singing lower. The high notes were the mark of an innocently beautiful approach to rock & roll singing, the bass ones more symptomatic of his penchant for self-mockery. (what crap, Landau) And on this album he seldom crawls past the middle register at all, a sure sign of what he's thinking about himself. (Whatever...!)

There are moments when he pushes past every fault of the format and generates not just smoke but fire -- as on a rousing "See See Rider."

But it is his good moments more than the bad ones that remind me of Greil Marcus' comment that Elvis Presley's whole career has been a throwaway. (Maybe it's a good thing you moved onto Springsteen...! Be gone! )

Albums like this one prove he was right. It is just that when I hear in the smallest ray of hope -- like the interplay between Presley's voice, Burton's guitar, and Ronny Tutt's drums on "Rider" -- that I remember that there isn't a reason in the world why he couldn't make an album that was good from beginning to end. Does he have to throw it all away?
- Jon Landau, Rolling Stone, 3/29/73.



Typical Rolling Stone rockist crap. There is, however, an element of truth that there were some troubling signs about Aloha, compared to say, '68, or TTWII or even EOT...
.

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**********************************
Bonus Reviews!

Although he is perhaps one of the world's greatest music legends, Presley proceeds to slay an audience with more guts and more soul and more intensity vocally than any performer alive. His shows are not only a production, but a musical "happening." And this live recording, which offers eight tunes previously unrecorded by Elvis, is not only a historical event because of the satellite broadcast and the U.S. TV special of the Hawaiian performance, but because Elvis, a focus point in the origin of rock, is perhaps back, cooking again like he seldom has in the past several years. Only on a couple of the tunes does he fail to exhibit that "spirit" for which he paved the way. Best cuts: "My Way," "What Now My Love," and a sparkling version of "Fever."

- Billboard, 1973.


I like you, Billboard, I really do. :lol:

This was Elvis Presley's most celebrated live performance, viewed by over a billion people worldwide via satellite. It includes "C.C. Rider," "Burnin' Love," "Early Morning Rain," "Love Me," "Fever," "Big Hunk of Love," and 24 more.

- Roundup Newsletter

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Wed Jul 12, 2006 8:23 pm

dreambear wrote:
carolynlm wrote:Not perfect???? Some of you are very difficult to please.
If there was anyone who was trying to 'sell' Elvis....the Aloha concerts are a pretty good place to start."

If you play the Aloha broadcast to young people ( I tried a couple of times), the reaction I gets is that he´s stiff and doesn´t rock out. But they think he´s quite cool in "On tour".

But my 87 year old father, thinks that Aloha is the best one...just because of the stiffness and the many ballads. So it depends on who you try to sell Elvis to.

//Björn
My friends (young people, who aren't really fans) want to see Aloha, cause it's theire favorite. (I have shown them some 50's performances, the comeback special, TTWII, and Aloha)

Wed Jul 12, 2006 8:28 pm

Scott Haigh 781990EP wrote:
I would've loved if Elvis replaced songs like 'Welcome to my world' and 'Long tall Sally/Whole lot of shaking going on' with stuff that had'nt been released yet, like 'Its impossible', or something rocknroll he had'nt even tried like 'Too much'.
Replacing 'Welcome to my world' for 'It's impossible'? No thanks :wink:

Wed Jul 12, 2006 8:29 pm

Oh, don't get me wrong, I LOVE "Aloha", but I'm not so in love that I won't acknowledge what I perceive to be flaws.

Nonetheless, that's a good article you've picked out, Greg, and highlights some of the absurdity that permeates the "Elvis Myth" -- then and now. That comment about his vocal register is ludicrous. In fact, I'd say its borderline "Goldman". Some people will stop at nothing to tear someone down.

Wed Jul 12, 2006 8:33 pm

Joe Car wrote:First of all, his version of Something smokes the Beatles version

Cryogenic wrote:Elvis has a lovely smooth voice on this rendition of "Something", but he sounds a little dispassionate, too. His version is a little bit withdrawn and sullen -- when it should be sultry and enrapturing. The Beatles have this one.

The problem with Elvis' take on "Something," be it 1970 or 1973, is twofold.

His vocals lack the deep commitment he always gave his greatest ballads, and the arrangement is pure Vegas. No way that "smokes" the original 1969 recording.

And Elvis' key lyric change ("You're asking me will my love grow ...") is greatly annoying -- it alters the emotional texture of Harrison's work, and makes a dedicated listener think Presley really doesn't give a hoot about the song's depth.

However, one can easily imagine that an Elvis in January 1969, working on the song at American with Chips Moman might have had greater results. Chips knew how to craft a great arrangement, and get the best out of Presley. Yes, George may not yet have written the song and, yes, "Hey Jude" from the same era isn't much, this is just a wistful notion.

The 1973 Landau review of the "Aloha" soundtrack is hardly "crap."

Anyone reading his tremendous look at the Nov '71 Boston show -- it can be seen in part on the great One Night Only! import CD notes -- or the 1968 TV Special knows that Jon appreciated who Elvis was in the fifties, and who he'd become as a mature artist. Simply put, Landau loved the man and his music and was thrilled by his rebirth.

But what Landau observes on the "Aloha" soundtrack is an artist who was losing his way, a man who was becoming consumed by too many shows in Las Vegas since that 1971 gig and beginning to repeat the sins of his wasted years in Hollywood. And Elvis was not yet "old" at 38 -- as Landau well knew -- he was just choosing to let his talent slide, which is evident to the reviewer.

It hurt to read the truth, especially coming from someone with a great background in popular music like Landau, but that's the way it was.

Wed Jul 12, 2006 8:41 pm

I've always been of the opinion that some critics who review movies, books, concerts or whatever, have an inbred reason to find a fault with what they have seen.

I don't need their input to determine whether or not I will go see something nor do they change my opinion of what I have seen.

Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:03 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:The 1973 Landau review of the "Aloha" soundtrack is hardly "crap."


As my last post indicates, I think that Landau went too far (and not just with the example I cited), but I'll admit that he is on the money in other respects.

drjohncarpenter wrote:But what Landau observes on the "Aloha" soundtrack is an artist who was losing his way, a man who was becoming consumed by too many shows in Las Vegas since that 1971 gig and beginning to repeat the sins of his wasted years in Hollywood. And Elvis was not yet "old" at 38 -- as Landau well knew -- he was just choosing to let his talent slide, which is evident to the reviewer.


A very eloquent summation. I particularly like the highlighted bit (hence the reason for doing so). Elvis was going down in 1973 and had been for some time. It was slow, subtle, almost insidious, but it was happening.

Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:14 pm

Cryogenic wrote:A very eloquent summation. I particularly like the highlighted bit (hence the reason for doing so). Elvis was going down in 1973 and had been for some time. It was slow, subtle, almost insidious, but it was happening.

Thanks -- the part highlighted is pretty much was Landau was getting at in his excellent review. It's not easy to address the failings of your ultimate hero in a major magazine, in front of peers who know of your deep admiration and affection for the artist.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:22 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
But what (Jon) Landau observes on the "Aloha" soundtrack is an artist who was losing his way, a man who was becoming consumed by too many shows in Las Vegas since that 1971 gig and beginning to repeat the sins of his wasted years in Hollywood. And Elvis was not yet "old" at 38 -- as Landau well knew -- he was just choosing to let his talent slide, which is evident to the reviewer.

It hurt to read the truth, especially coming from someone with a great background in popular music like Landau, but that's the way it was.


That's why I did finally have to put that caveat at the end of my rant in red. I really like his '71 Boston review (one of the finest pieces of Elvis writing out there), and actually came across that very same (now rare) issue of "Rolling Stone" for sale last year in a record store -in Boston, naturally.

I don't agree with his specifics (they in fact quite annoy me), but he was indeed onto something.

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P.S. For those who've missed it, there's an interesting fan site dedicated to Elvis & Hawaii:

http://www.elvisinhawaii.com

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I was thinking about what I would have improved (see? it's contagious :lol: ) and that would have been to increase the interaction of Elvis and his bandmembers, and background singers -and audience, thus reducing the "recital" aspect the show produced.

I'd keep quite a bit of it, as is, but imagine just having a bit more of the loose and free-wheeling Elvis seen in TTWII and even EOT. Consider how much more involved he was with the production of his prior NBC-TV Special, just five years earlier.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 2:37 am

In 1973, what excitement when we heard that Aloha From Hawaii was to be telecast live all over the Globe.. and that they've included Asia as well. Since it won't be shown on Singapore Television. A whole bunch of us had no choice but to to travel to Bangkok for it.
We were definately not dissapointed, but we wished he had moved a little more. He looks fantasticaly slim and handsome. Superb slick back "Elvis" hairstyle and loved that unique white eagle jumpsuit. It was indeed a Historical mement, the first of its kind in 1973. And we went home feeling proud of our hero.

Recently, the new DVD box set came out and we bought it and it sure brings back wonderful great memories. Long Live The KING.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:23 am

jak wrote:Over the years I've met two ordinary fans who actually attended the televised concert.Even though I consider it to be just an average performance I couldnt help being envious while talking to these people about their experiences and how great it must have been to be in the audience.Good or bad it was a milestone and is part of the Elvis mythology.They both described the show as out of this world and unreal.If my rear end had been in a seat that night I probably would say the same thing.I got to see Elvis perform once and the one thing that will always stay with me was the power of his persona.Im sure with the hype that must have surrounded that show combined with the stage effects along with Elvis' charisma the people who were there had an experience they will never forget and would think me crazy for calling it average.I wish I had been there for that "average" concert.
Jak


Bravo !

-----------------------------

Different "fans" approach the "Aloha Special" from different (somewhat biased) perspectives:

- "50's EP fans are critical of what E had become (so far distanced from both what he started as and what he started ....)

- 60's fans view it as Elvis - once again - losing his way (before briefly finding it again in '68 - '69) ....... the prospect of thrown away talent, etc..

- 70's fans see the show as our hero at his pinnacle, top of his game, height of his career ........ with nowhere else to really go, except down, with time (granted, it didn't have to be that way, but that's another debate, for another time).

I fall into the 3rd group above, .... but, in a way, ............ all three categories do indeed have their own valid points.

The "Aloha Elvis" represents EP The American Legend (one who had transformed from the "Rebel", thru a mainstream phase, to "Cultural Icon" thru each of the respective decades of his career). It was also an older, more mature Elvis; mature both musically & personally (due to the the inevitable change(s) that life experience brings to us all). Both do indeed manifest in the show.

Of course, the show isn't truly "perfect." (Who amongst any of us, truly is .. ?) EP was immensely nervous at the outset ... and wasn't able to shake it off until around after the 3rd number. Towards the end of the show, however, that's all ancient history ----> with E having a bit of fun / horseplay (the water tossing bit on Glen, etc.). EP also sang the songs in his own way, with his own unique nuances, phrasing, feelings, & emotion.

Considering the enormity of the event & the intense pressure / scrutiny that was coming to bear with the show ----> it was nearly perfect enough ------> and, most importantly, mission accomplished.

The Aloha Special has also withstood the test of time and has rightly taken its place as a positive classic by the majority of the fandom (hardcore & casual, alike).

It is what it is: a gift to the worldwide fandom (since EP couldn't literally go to them). It was also his testament to what he was, or more specifically, had become ............. a patriot (American) & a matured artist (on multiple levels). EP was sending that message with visuals (the attire), his behavior (reserved), & of course, with what it was all about ------> his voice / music.

(Sidenote: some of the criticisms regarding EP's voice, .......... pretty much leave me speechless. If ever there were an example, ............ that such things are entirely SUBJECTIVE ............. this would be an excellent one).

----------------------------------

For a truer glimpse as to the real EP, the rehearsal is a more accurate record for history.

For the actual special, ........ EP did indeed seek to achieve perfection ............ and in his own mind .............. he was more than statisfied with the result. In the end, ............ that's all that truly matters.

Generally speaking: there will always be those who have a hard time accepting or forgiving Elvis for not living up to what he once was or what they wished him to be or become, ............... but, ..... the 70's Elvis was exactly what you see in the Aloha Special (which is usually either "good" or "bad", depending on where each individual fan's mindset / preferences are to begin with).

The Aloha events are my perennial favorites.


N8

Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:29 am

N880EP, that my friend was brilliant!

Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:48 am

carolynlm wrote:Absolutely N8.....you just need to watch Elvis striding off the stage with the 'crown' in his hand to see he was very confident that he had done a good job.....the two fingers pointing in the air, with the small glance to the others......brilliant stuff......


To EP, it was his version of winning the Super Bowl, he had every right to feel proud. A poor boy from Tupelo just knocked them dead in front of over a billion people. I dare say he accomplished everything he wanted to from that show.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:53 am

N880EP wrote:Generally speaking[/b]: there will always be those who have a hard time accepting or forgiving Elvis for not living up to what he once was or what they wished him to be or become, ............... but, ..... the 70's Elvis was exactly what you see in the Aloha Special (which is usually either "good" or "bad", depending on where each individual fan's mindset / preferences are to begin with).

The Aloha events are my perennial favorites.


N8


I have nothing against the 70s Elvis. I love the 70s Elvis. But the 70s Elvis was not just what you see in Aloha. TTWII was also the 70s Elvis and he was twice the performer then. It has nothing to do with not forgiving Elvis for failing to live up to expectations. There's nothing to forgive. For many it's just a case of regretting that the truly dynamic Elvis seen in the early 70s was so short lived due to a mixture of personal and physical problems. By Aloha, the signs were already there both vocally and physically.

Thu Jul 13, 2006 5:05 am

I am very critical of a lot of the 70s stuff but this over the top second by second analysis of the ALOHA show is crappola!!!!! Every ELVIS fan here including the Doc, cryogenic would have been BLOWN AWAY BY ELVIS HAD THEY SEEN HIM LIVE AT THE TIME BEFORE THE ERA OF THE VCR!!!!

Thu Jul 13, 2006 5:21 am

TJ wrote:It has nothing to do with not forgiving Elvis for failing to live up to expectations. There's nothing to forgive. For many it's just a case of regretting that the truly dynamic Elvis seen in the early 70s was so short lived due to a mixture of personal and physical problems.


"Forgiving" is the destination that one eventually reaches, if able to, while traversing the road of "regret."

You are still on the that road (not to mention some of the other "issues" you have) ....... :wink: :lol: ).

--------------------------------------------

Always happy to help you find your way. No need to thank me, TJ.

--------------------------------------------

To "Joe" & "Carol" ................. all my best.


N8

Thu Jul 13, 2006 6:23 am

N8, JLGB, Joe Car, Carolyn, CD King, et al, well said.

I thought I was going crazy for a second there from the "Glass Half Empty crowd. :D

The bar was higher than ever (first ever such satellite show, etc.) and, if not exactly to our liking (or his), our "boy" had pulled it off by the end. We share his relief and sense of "yes, it's been nailed!"

If it wasn't for the fact that I watched a goodly portion of ALOHA the other night with some visiting family member (who hadn't seen it in years), I'd cue it up in the next few days soon and see "how bad or "disappointing" it was..." :lol:

It is, however, the function of hindsight and deluxe DVD sets (always at the ready) that allow all of us -and even those born five to ten years after the performance, to pick up on undeniable "gaffes" and "what was that?" moments. That's inevitable, too. May future historians " a hundred years from now" still recognize how much of a triumph this show was at the time...