All posts with more than 3000 Hits, prior to 2008

Tue Jul 04, 2006 6:37 am

jetblack wrote:How can the Doc be so rude just because another Elvis fan has a differing opinion?. There is so much wrong with the Elvis world at the moment.

Andy, some people in the Elvis world might think YOU are being very rude -- accusing someone else of being rude when they were not at all being rude.

Tue Jul 04, 2006 6:53 am

jetblack wrote:How can the Doc be so rude just because another Elvis fan has a differing opinion?. There is so much wrong with the Elvis world at the moment.

Andy


Stck around, it only gets worse!!! :wink:

8)

The Doc has his own Dictionary with all the words meanings changed to suit him. And you better agree with him!!! :wink:

Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:00 am

I know what Colin and 'Genic mean, but I also dislike the often-knee jerk "rock" assumption that anything with horns and "production" is somehow less "authentic." This is exactly what they mean when the term "rockist" comes up in music criticism circles: the rock tendency to downplay anything from the "pop" world.

In that sense, Swingin' is on to something. I concede there's a dated aspect to the production,but then mainly because today's music has mostly forgotten about things like horn sections, "swing," and the like.

I see little reason to tear down the '68 special too much. It all worked for one hour.
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:01 am

sam wrote:Stck around, it only gets worse!!!

What, your spelling?

Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:13 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
sam wrote:Stck around, it only gets worse!!!

What, your spelling?



No your rudeness!!!

:P

Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:23 am

sam wrote:No your rudeness!!!

Actually, laughter is the best medicine. Try it sometime.

And how "rude" can I be? You constantly follow my posts around here -- you must have me bookmarked. Thanks for the affection.

Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:25 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
sam wrote:No your rudeness!!!

Actually, laughter is the best medicine. Try it sometime.

And how "rude" can I be? You constantly follow my posts around here -- you must have me bookmarked. Thanks for the affection.


Laughter??? I laugh at you all the time!!!

No Doc I'm not following you around. You're just getting in the way like a bad smell!!! :oops:


8)

Tue Jul 04, 2006 11:29 am

I have stated on this board before that just because a fan doesn't agree with anothers's opinion why is that so hard too take for some. OK SLGM prefers the movie 'Girl Happy' over 'King Creole' and I respect him for that opinion. At least he has the balls too say what HE prefers. Why have little digs at that opinion or his preferences for the '68 material - he ain't gonna change his mind!

Andy

Tue Jul 04, 2006 11:47 am

ColinB wrote:Just for the record [once again] can I just say that the backings Elvis received in the 'stand-up' segments of the '68 Show were the most shoddy, 'showbizzy', unsympathetic, corny, big-band, under-rehearsed and poorly executed of his career and were totally at loggerheads with the true spirit of real rock 'n' roll.

Why Elvis ever tolerated them is a mystery.


My thoughts exactly and the Blue Suede shoes point already mentioned above illustrates that perfectly. Even though Elvis loses his place and is initially to blame, he's faced with musicians who (to quote Jeff Bridges in the Fabulous Baker Boys) would need sheet music to play Happy Birthday. They have no business playing rock n roll and there is no place for an orchestra on a record like Blue Suede Shoes. That awful intro to Jailhouse Rock is another example that makes me mad every time I hear it. Just totally lacking the timing of the original because the musicians have no feel for rock n roll.

Tue Jul 04, 2006 3:21 pm

It was the first Elvis Album I owned so I always thought it sounded good!!!



:shock:

Tue Jul 04, 2006 3:40 pm

jetblack wrote:I have stated on this board before that just because a fan doesn't agree with anothers's opinion why is that so hard too take for some. OK SLGM prefers the movie 'Girl Happy' over 'King Creole' and I respect him for that opinion. At least he has the balls too say what HE prefers. Why have little digs at that opinion or his preferences for the '68 material - he ain't gonna change his mind!

Andy


Andy, arrogance and a hardline approach is a permanent fixture on this site. Aside from that, most people on this forum do know their stuff.

Tue Jul 04, 2006 4:51 pm

re: orchestra

Dayton "Bones" Howe was the musical producer, an area he specializes in. Having been a recording engineer at Radio Recorders in Los Angles, Mr. Howe had worked with Elvis before. When he first found out that NBC wanted Steve Binder to direct the project, it was Howe who told him he would hit it off well with Elvis. Bones Howe has since worked on such projects as "Back To the Future", "National Lampoon's Vegas Vacation" and "A Walk On the Moon" among many others.

The musical director was Billy Goldenberg who would go on to work with Elvis on the film "Change of Habit."His credits today include over 160 TV series, specials or mini-series that he has composed for. He has been nominated eleven times for Emmy Awards winning one for the 1978 mini series "King" and he has been the musical director for specials with Barbra Streisand and Diana Ross as well.

http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/elvis_6 ... cial.shtml

http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/intervi ... nder.shtml


I once read that Billy Goldenberg worked on COH at Elvis request and because of his own ambitions he later declined to accompany Elvis in Las Vegas. So what did Elvis think of the NBC orchestra? Do you think he would have voiced his concerns regarding the arrangements, if he wouldn't have liked them?

Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:54 pm

The "Stand-Up" shows were fabulous, even in the raw form in which they were recorded. Rehearsals would have made them that much better. There were several instances in which Elvis looked a little unsure of himself and very uncomfortable, which is completely understandable.

I don't know that I would go so far as to say the songs dwarfed the original versions--not by a long shot. But, the purpose of those shows was to present some of Elvis's greatest hits in a big way, in front of a frenzied audience, and show the world that the man was back. Was he ever.

Tue Jul 04, 2006 8:16 pm

I am now wondering if another idea was knocked around at the time.

They did the sitdown "unplugged" shows with scotty and d.j. so I wonder if it wasn't considered to have them perform at the standup shows, electrified with d.j. and his drum kit.

I think it would have been better to have the little combo do the stand-up shows rather than an ORCHESTRA!!

They just would have had to have filled in a bass player.

And if they had gotten the Jordaniares it would have been a nostalgic masterpiece.

I think under these circumstances, "don't be cruel" would have been a whole lot better.

Wed Jul 05, 2006 8:09 am

TJ wrote:
ColinB wrote:Just for the record [once again] can I just say that the backings Elvis received in the 'stand-up' segments of the '68 Show were the most shoddy, 'showbizzy', unsympathetic, corny, big-band, under-rehearsed and poorly executed of his career and were totally at loggerheads with the true spirit of real rock 'n' roll.

Why Elvis ever tolerated them is a mystery.


My thoughts exactly and the Blue Suede shoes point already mentioned above illustrates that perfectly. Even though Elvis loses his place and is initially to blame, he's faced with musicians who (to quote Jeff Bridges in the Fabulous Baker Boys) would need sheet music to play Happy Birthday. They have no business playing rock n roll and there is no place for an orchestra on a record like Blue Suede Shoes. That awful intro to Jailhouse Rock is another example that makes me mad every time I hear it. Just totally lacking the timing of the original because the musicians have no feel for rock n roll.



Guys, I'll admit they weren't the Nashville "A" team, and the like but let's not make it like they were a bunch of NBC clowns.

As Ernst Jorgensen writes in "Elvis: A Life in Music":

"Bones Howe, who would be supervising the actual recordings, brought in some of L.A.'s best sesson players - among them drummer Hal Blaine (considered a true legend today, incidentally- Greg), guitarist Tommy Tedesco, and pianist Larry Muhoberac - to help create a new, contemporary sound for Elvis."

Just a counter-perspective, folks, and I recall reading (or hearing, actually) a Steve Binder interview recently where he talks about Elvis watching the final version of the TV show with him alone, totally thrilled with the outcome.

Wed Jul 05, 2006 10:59 am

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:"Bones Howe, who would be supervising the actual recordings, brought in some of L.A.'s best sesson players - among them drummer Hal Blaine (considered a true legend today, incidentally- Greg), guitarist Tommy Tedesco, and pianist Larry Muhoberac - to help create a new, contemporary sound for Elvis."

Just a counter-perspective, folks, and I recall reading (or hearing, actually) a Steve Binder interview recently where he talks about Elvis watching the final version of the TV show with him alone, totally thrilled with the outcome.


But Greg, that was for the studio sessions, surely ?

Even they weren't great, but they were on a higher level than the 'stand-up' shambles of a backing !

Wed Jul 05, 2006 11:29 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Guys, I'll admit they weren't the Nashville "A" team, and the like but let's not make it like they were a bunch of NBC clowns. As Ernst Jorgensen writes in "Elvis: A Life in Music":

"Bones Howe, who would be supervising the actual recordings, brought in some of L.A.'s best sesson players - among them drummer Hal Blaine (considered a true legend today, incidentally- Greg), guitarist Tommy Tedesco, and pianist Larry Muhoberac - to help create a new, contemporary sound for Elvis."

Two things: these guys were in their own right incredible musicians, fully the equal of the Nashville cats. Blaine and Tedesco are absolute legends. And Ernst made a typo regarding the keyboards -- it's Larry Knechtal who contributed to the June 1968 TV Special sessions at Western Recorders and NBC-TV Burbank.

Thu Jul 06, 2006 7:49 pm

Thanks for the info. I recall reading that even the Nashville session guys that we today think so highly of did not have all that much prestige in certain circles outside of Elvis and maybe Nashville. Maybe by ''69-'70, they were, but in the early '60s..?
******************
Colin, I'm not sure there's a difference. Doc?

Sun Sep 10, 2006 11:17 pm

Having just watched the 68 Special on my old VIRGIN video from the 90s, I have to say, I stick by everything I ever said. The two stand up shows are Elvis' finest hour and every song in that section is the best version he ever cut. :lol:

Sun Sep 10, 2006 11:29 pm

Swingin-Little-Guitar-Man wrote:Having just watched the 68 Special on my old VIRGIN video from the 90s, I have to say, I stick by everything I ever said. The two stand up shows are Elvis' finest hour and every song in that section is the best version he ever cut. :lol:


Now stop it - people will think you're being serious !