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SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sat May 17, 2008 12:30 am

Disc 1 of the Seventies Box Set (the most played decade in my house) is an amazing mess of poor choices by Elvis and his management for singles.

Listening to the top 30 during the early ‘70s (I was 15 as the decade began) many of Elvis’ singles just didn’t fit in. I’m not saying he had to fit in, but better contemporary and catchy material remained hidden in albums, and the singles from “Patch It Up” (which I don’t like because of its repetitiveness – though for some reason I love the extended live versions of “Suspicious Minds”) right through to “Burning Love” (save for the exceptional “I’m Leavin’”) were poor.

I’ve excluded “I Just Can’t Help Believin’” and “How Web Was Woven” as that was not a North American single (I’m Canadian).

“The Wonder of You” (a very old song at the time) did amazingly well, and it’s hard to argue its release. “I’ve Lost You” (tilting toward too repetitive) and “The Next Step Is Love” was a solid release from his latest film. “You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me” is good. However, “Patch It Up”, as hard as it tries to rock and roll, is only average in material, and obviously not well liked by the public.

The next string of tracks is pedestrian, of poor quality or in the case of the last one, performed without emotion:

“There Goes My Everything” (easy going country corn, whose cousin “He Is My Everything” I also dislike);
“Life” (whose lyrics 30 plus years later I still don’t understand);
“Where Did They Go, Lord?” (which RCA thought for years was a gospel song);
“It’s Only Love” and “The Sound Of Your Cry” (both REALLY tried at the contemporary vain, but fail);
“Until It’s Time For You To Go” (successful, though v-e-r-y slow);
“We Can Make The Morning” (a very unlikely choice for a single, even the “B” side);
“An American Trilogy” (undeniably great in person as I can personally tell you, but as a single???); and
“The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” (misses the critical third verse and falls far short of heart felt live performances – especially December 1976).

When compiling various CDs of material, these hardly ever appear on my discs.

Unfortunately, for the pop chart, Elvis’ single choices woke up too late, and classics like “Promised Land” and “T-R-O-U-B-L-E” never had a chance to reach the top.

Disc 3 and Disc 4 of the ‘70s Box Set (aside from the three at piano recordings which should NOT have been included and a lackluster but understandable inclusion of the studio version of “My Way”) blow Disc 1 away every which way. They’re virtually personal preference compilations minus the four tracks just mentioned, although I still lament the exclusion of “Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain” and “It’s Easy For You”

Disc 2 representing the rest of his singles is very solid other than the ridiculous “Raised On Rock” and the flip of “T-R-O-U-B-L-E” – but why would you ever turn that single over to listen to “Mr. Songman” (a song I like, but do recognize its shortcomings). Only “Hurt” is really out of touch with the mid-70s – but his interest in it meant I got to hear it in person many, many times.

Wrong choices = expected outcome.
Last edited by Christopher Brown on Sun May 18, 2008 3:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sat May 17, 2008 10:33 am

Could there have been better choices made at times? Yes, but I recently got a Japanese LP box set from 1985 that had every single from 54-85 on there and I have to say the seventies ones held up pretty well. Of the ones you pointed out in list form
“There Goes My Everything” (easy going country corn, whose cousin “He Is My Everything” I also dislike);A good vocal and arrangement, I too would of picked something with a little more fire say Whole Lotta Shakin Going On or perhaps I Washed My Hands. That doesn't mean I don't like it, I just think there were too many ballads in a row coming out as singles.
“Life” (whose lyrics 30 plus years later I still don’t understand); One of my least favorites also
“Where Did They Go, Lord?” (which RCA thought for years was a gospel song);
Good vocal, interesting production, if not his best]
“It’s Only Love” and “The Sound Of Your Cry” (both REALLY tried at the contemporary vain, but fail); Two songs which some hate but I happen to like. I think the music is produced well and that he sings wonderfully. It's very pop so those who generally favor his fifties material is not going to like them. Maybe I am the only one who likes both.
“Until It’s Time For You To Go” (successful, though v-e-r-y slow); Pretty song good production. I think it was a solid choice
“We Can Make The Morning” (a very unlikely choice for a single, even the “B” side);
Another great vocal, very good pop. Again this is not a direction favored by some but I think he was really good at bringing this type of song alive.
“An American Trilogy” (undeniably great in person as I can personally tell you, but as a single???); True it worked better in concert then as a commercial hit, it still is a defining moment in Elvis' catalog. and
“The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” (misses the critical third verse and falls far short of heart felt live performances – especially December 1976).I like this one too, very nicely done, Elvis' is my favorite rendition. Maybe the concert version was a little less stiff, but the acoustic guitar on the studio cut is amazing

Whenever I talk about these type of songs I know I am putting myself up for some critique but you like what you like.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sat May 17, 2008 9:34 pm

I remember reading somewhere (probably in one of Ernst's books) that RCA had another single planned for release at the time instead of "Trilogy," but Elvis insisted. Trilogy was a great song in it's concert context, but not a great single choice. This is one time when Elvis instincts or whatever were wrong.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sun May 18, 2008 8:47 am

I agree that the single choices were poor in the early 70's. Too many slow ballads, not enough uptempo material. A track like "There Goes My Everything" works fine in context on "Elvis Country", but I wouldn't have chosen it for single release. For that matter, I don't really hear any "singles" on "Elvis Country". It just flows so well as an album, perhaps they should have just let it stand as it was. When Elvis did finally put out a rockin' single, "Burning Love", he had his biggest hit in 2 or 3 years, the classic Elvis sound that everyone missed. From that point on, Elvis and RCA did a much better job at picking singles. "Steamroller Blues" was a natural, after the success of the "Aloha" broadcast; 'I've Got a Thing About You Baby" should've been a bigger hit - Elvis connected with the Tony Joe White material so well, surprising he didn't record more; "If You Talk in Your Sleep" was kind of different for Elvis, rather adult lyric content, and a kind of Vegas meets Memphis soul sound - certainly not a song you could confuse with the bland ballads. "Promised Land" was his biggest hit of the last 3 or 4 years, and again, fans responded to Elvis covering a classic rock and roll song. So how did "T-R-O-U-B-L-E" miss? Was it seen as kind of a "Promised Land" clone? Okay, similar backbeat, but that's where the similarity ends.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Thu May 22, 2008 1:41 am

As I recall "I Really Don't Want To Know/There Goes My Everything made the Billboard Country Top Ten peaking at #9. So in my mind the single served its purpose. Which was to get Elvis back on country radio. To get him taken seriously by the country audience once again. This audience served him well in the years to come. The name of the album after all was "Elvis Country."

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Thu May 22, 2008 7:56 am

Good point. Elvis' singles in the mid 70's generally did better on the country charts (and in some cases, on the AC charts), than on the pop top 40. My Boy was #1 on the AC chart, Moody Blue and Way Down both topped the country chart, and many other singles were top 10 country (Help Me/If You Talk in Your Sleep, Promised Land/It's Midnight, T-R-O-U-B-L-E, Hurt/For the Heart).

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Thu May 22, 2008 2:32 pm

Not too mention I've Got A Thing About You Baby/Take Good Care Of Her.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Thu May 22, 2008 2:43 pm

Though like the rest of Elvis' career it dropped off a bit in the mid sixties, he was a big country artist from day one. I feel he changed that field quite a bit, made it more youthful and modern. Johnny Cash had a big role in that too, but people like Marty Robbins and George Jones were very influenced by Elvis for a period of time.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sun Jun 08, 2008 11:42 am

Except for 1971 where he completely lost the plot in terms of singles, I think Elvis chose very wisely in terms of his singles choices.

"Until it's Time For You to Go" seems like it should have been a big hit for someone, yet Elvis' version which just broke Top 40 was as high as it got in any version. "An American Trilogy" was an insane commercial choice with its long running time and coming so close on the heels of Mickey Newbury's record but Elvis saw it as his best shot at that time. I had to respect that.

"I've Lost You" you could win or lose on that one. Audiences seem to respond as sales approached 700,000 but programmers didn't seem to like it. "I Really Don't Want to Know" was the A-side of "There Goes My Everything" and it's simply an epic performance. Again fans seemed to like it to the tune of almost 750,000 records but programmers didn't. But damn it was a great piece of soul blues, that must have sounded great and unpredictable coming out of the Top 40.

After the success of "Burning Love" which happened to hit Top Ten in a week that also featured big hits by Ricky Nelson and Chuck Berry, I think there was a backlash against playing '50s artists on the air. For Berry and Nelson, it wiped them out. For Elvis who was picking up country and adult contemporary fans, it limited his options. I also think Elvis was too darn eclectic. The audience for "Burning Love" and "Separate Ways" was just not the same.

I think "T-R-O-U-B-L-E" was a whiff by programmers and audiences. Up tempo rockers were having a tough time getting airplay by 1975. Led Zeppelin's "Trampled Under Foot" from the same year did even worse than "T-R-O-U-B-L-E" in the Top 40. Sadly, Elvis didn't have the FM following that Led Zeppelin had which meant even though they weren't breaking the Top 20, they were still racking up huge LP numbers. Elvis' eclecticism assured he never would have access to that audience. Even in middle to old age, the classic rock audience has little tolerance for songs about divorce and middle age. At that time, they must have viewed something like "Separate Ways" as an old man's song.

"Promised Land"'s chart position is a little deceiving. According to Ernst, Elvis and the Colonel demanded more promotion for Elvis' single after "I've Got a Thing About You Baby" sold about 500,000 and missed the Top 30. (Imagine what it would have sold if it had been given heavy airplay.) "Promised Land" and "If You Talk in Your Sleep" sold about 150,000 units less apiece but charted much better.

In the 1970s especially though winning a single was a crap shoot. A super piece of schlock like Terry Jacks' "Seasons in the Sun" tears up the charts while Bruce Springsteen can't even break the Top 20 with "Born To Run."

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sun Jun 08, 2008 1:43 pm

Very good post, but though I concede "Rags To Riches" as solid but not commercial and "Life" as being pretty bad I think the rest of the 1971 releases were among his best. "I'm Leavin'" every has high praise from pretty much everyone, but It's Only Love is also a fine modern (for 1971) record that I think is underrated highly. Merry Christmas Baby is a wonderful single and has a fine b-side too. If only the 1971 Xmas album was as good as the single, but I digress. Why these did not do well I cannot even venture to guess, other then to say that perhaps rock radio programers of the seventies saw Elvis as an oldies act with the exception of The Wonder Of You and Burning Love.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sun Jun 08, 2008 9:35 pm

Elvis was at his most eclectic in the 70's. The success of Burning Love would seem to cry out for more rock and roll songs, yet he follows it up with Separate Ways. Then it's back to his funkier side with Steamroller Blues (although the b-side, Fool, also got airplay). Promised Land was his highest charting record in a couple years, so what do they follow it up with? My Boy - another divorce ballad. And then another rocker, T-R-O-U-B-L-E. And then another divorce ballad, Pieces of My Life....or was Bringing it Back the a-side? Either way, it bombed. I don't know if there was a bias against 50's artists after Burning Love/Garden Party/Ding-A-Ling, but I can't rule out the possibility. Programmers may have preferred to keep artists like Nelson, Berry, etc and fond memories from the past. The kind of 50's/early 60's nostalgia that brought us American Graffitti, Happy Days, and Grease was not the kind that allowed for taking these performers seriously as artists. "Ricky Nelson? Oh yeah, he was that crew cut kid on Ozzie and Harriet that sang those cutesy songs like "Be Bop Baby", ha ha ha". "No, he's got long hair now, and a real cool country rock band called the Stone Canyon Band, he writes his own songs, and does stuff by Bob Dylan, Tim Hardin, and people like that". "Oh sure, does he work 'I don't mess around boy' into the lyrics, lol". Fortunately, the rockabilly revival of the early 80's allowed for reassessment of these artists.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Tue Jun 10, 2008 9:53 am

Lonely summer- One of the shames of bias against '50s artists was that many of them including Nelson were very credibly recording in a modern groove. There's often been a lot of complaints about Nelson's label failing to issue his very fine remake of "Dream Lover" after his great SNL appearance but really couldn't someone have slapped it on the radio anyway. It fits in very well to my ears amongst pieces like JD Souther's "You're Only Lonely" which was a massive hit in 1979.

Mike I agree about "I'm Leaving" but I feel it's very uncommercial. I think it's a little disquieting for the Top 40 and worse for Elvis it's not immediately recognizable as Elvis product. "Merry Christmas Baby" is truly great but programmers probably rejected it as a retread or something. They might have thought "Blue Christmas" was enough Elvis to fill the Christmas niche. "It's Only Love" is respectable to me but I don't feel it stands out in any way. It has kind of a cookie cutter feel, which I would also say to a lesser extent about the B-side.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Tue Jun 10, 2008 10:11 am

"I'm Leavin" is a nice track, but it's very subtle, takes several listenings to make an impact. The first record I had it on was the silver box set, and it wasn't one of the songs that jumped out at me. "It's Only Love" is an alright track, but sounds somewhat pedestrian to my ears. Typical early 70's. "Merry Christmas Baby" is a killer track, one of Elvis' best ever blues performances, but again, not exactly hit single material. I wonder if "I'll Be Home on Christmas Day" might have done better on top 40 radio in 1971? Or possibly country radio?

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Tue Jun 10, 2008 11:07 am

likethebike I agree I'm Leavin' doesn't sound like "ELVIS" but that's part of it's charm. It shows him evolving as an artist. One thing I think you will agree with is that it was records like these that kept Elvis from turning into an oldies act. It did make the top 40 briefly and I think it's the Elvis track I most often play to people who only know the biggest hits. It may be understated, but hearing the acoustic sounds popular at the time makes me think it fit in with the charts. What it needed was promotion, maybe a promo film to go with it?
You are probably right about Merry Christmas Baby but it's a shame as since it was included in This Is Elvis it gets airplay each Christmas. Lonely Summer I'll Be Home on Christmas Day" could have been a good choice, it is a great country record.

It's Only Love is again a very different sound for Elvis. I think the produiction is very nice on it, a real layered sound. I like the interplay with the back up singers and I think the strings are very nicely done. I think Elvis sang it very well too. Too bad he didn't promote it in concert as that may have pushed it up the charts a little. Sound Of Your Cry is nice for almost the exact same reasons. Strong vocal, interesting arrangment, modern lyrics. I know these two songs aren't universally loved, but I see them as something that challenged Elvis to go beyond his roots.

1971 Elvis isn't really understood.too well in my opinion. I am not sure why but the Elvis of 1970 and 1972 seem much more popular. I think that too many people look at his marriage falling apart, seeing him gain a touch of weight, and just say "Oh it's the decline now". Perhaps he wasn't quite as fiery some nights, but I look at 1971 as a year in dire need of reapraisal.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:57 am

I prefer the later 70's singles from Elvis. I rarely put on "I'm Leavin", "Until it's Time for You to Go", "American Trilogy", "Where Did They Go Lord", or "Life". "Promised Land", "For the Heart", "Pieces of My Life", "Moody Blue", "Way Down", "If You Talk in Your Sleep", "My Boy", "I've Got a Thing About You Baby", "Steamroller Blues", 'T-R-O-U-B-L-E" get a lot more play on my home stereo.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Wed Jun 11, 2008 12:10 pm

Mike Eder wrote:1971 Elvis isn't really understood.too well in my opinion. I am not sure why but the Elvis of 1970 and 1972 seem much more popular. I think that too many people look at his marriage falling apart, seeing him gain a touch of weight, and just say "Oh it's the decline now". Perhaps he wasn't quite as fiery some nights, but I look at 1971 as a year in dire need of reapraisal.


I can't agree. I think that the standards of Elvis's recordings dropped alarmingly in 1971. Not that some good stuff wasn't cut, but compare the '71 sessions to the 1970 sessions, or the 1969 sessions, and you can't really say the '71 stuff stands up. It's just not in the same class. Also with Elvis committed to pop, religious and Christmas recordings, the material is all overthe place. The sessions lack drive and focus, and most of all they lack truly exceptional songs. It was the first year that Elvis stooped evolving since the '68 Special.

Despite Elvis barely straying into a recording studio in 1972, the new material he cut there and on stage during that year show a significant improvement IMO. There's a fire in his belly again.

Jules

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Wed Jun 11, 2008 1:24 pm

familyjules wrote:
Mike Eder wrote:1971 Elvis isn't really understood.too well in my opinion. I am not sure why but the Elvis of 1970 and 1972 seem much more popular. I think that too many people look at his marriage falling apart, seeing him gain a touch of weight, and just say "Oh it's the decline now". Perhaps he wasn't quite as fiery some nights, but I look at 1971 as a year in dire need of reapraisal.


I can't agree. I think that the standards of Elvis's recordings dropped alarmingly in 1971. Not that some good stuff wasn't cut, but compare the '71 sessions to the 1970 sessions, or the 1969 sessions, and you can't really say the '71 stuff stands up. It's just not in the same class. Also with Elvis committed to pop, religious and Christmas recordings, the material is all overthe place. The sessions lack drive and focus, and most of all they lack truly exceptional songs. It was the first year that Elvis stooped evolving since the '68 Special.

Despite Elvis barely straying into a recording studio in 1972, the new material he cut there and on stage during that year show a significant improvement IMO. There's a fire in his belly again.

Jules


That's the standard view, and I know it. I just don't see it myself. Do I think Elvis should have done a Christmas album? Not really, but I enjoy four ot five tunes from it very much. The rest of the stuff to me is really good. Something like Padre may be overblown, but I think Elvis' voice had a real richness and strengh that was a continued evolution of his mature style. I don't hear any loss of control that some people say exists there. Not everything Elvis did in 1969 or 1970 was great either, but most of what he did at those sessions is terrific and again for me most of what he did in 1971 is excellent as well. I can sit here and list track after track that I like but I know I can't convince you if you don't like the songs. All I can do is tell you what my impressions are, and to me 1971 is a year that is overlooked and underated. I willingly admit that I like most of what Elvis did period. I don't care for some soundtrack material, but otherwise I think Elvis had a lot to consistently offer. Now don't get me wrong I know that some of Elvis' concerts of the last 18 months weren't up to previous standards, but I think in the studio he was still cutting strong material. I know the 1971-76 studio material isn't loved by all, but I just don't go by the traditional view of those years.creatively.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Wed Jun 11, 2008 2:14 pm

I think the bottom line is this - if I was asked to compile an album of 1971 material that wasn't gospel or Christmas related, then I'd struggle. RCA must have thought the same, because they didn't do so either. And you can't say the same about 1969 or 1970. Yes there's some great stuff from 1971.....but there's just not very much of it.

Jules

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Wed Jun 11, 2008 2:48 pm

Not going in any order such as a track lineup,I could put 12 good songs together.that aren't Gospel or Xmas.
First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
For Lovin Me
Early Morning Rain
Don't Think Twice
Help Me Make It
Until It's Time
I'm Leavin'
We Can Make The Morning
It's Only Love
It's Still Here
Love The Life I Lead
I Will Be True

Fools Rush In, and Kathleen are also good but I think have a different feel or background then the other songs
My Way is sedate but not nearly as bad as people say.
Padre is the one true miss for me.

So going by it track by track I think a solid pop album could have been made.It's not a hard rock album, and I think that's why some don't like this stuff. Perhaps they find it too removed from vintage Elvis of either 55,60, or even 69. I find it to be an attempt to grow and evolve and to go out on a limb. I like Fool and Now as is, but perhaps having all the 1971 cuts in one place would have pleased later day critics of Elvis' LP output.

Again if you don't like the songs you don't and I respect that, but still I don't see how Elvis was going downhill.as an artist outside of doing a Christmas project that had to many traditional songs on it.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Wed Jun 11, 2008 3:00 pm

familyjules wrote:I think that the standards of Elvis's recordings dropped alarmingly in 1971.
Not that some good stuff wasn't cut, but compare the '71 sessions to the 1970 sessions, or the 1969 sessions, and you can't really say the '71 stuff stands up.
It's just not in the same class.


Yes.

The welcome [and long-overdue] return to creativity in the recording studio that occurred in 1969, had settled down to workmanlike efficiency in 1970, but was tapering off into boredom and sloppiness by 1971.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Wed Jun 11, 2008 10:33 pm

Hallelujah!

Spot on!

//Björn

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Thu Jun 12, 2008 9:14 am

I don't think Elvis got off track in '71 except for one area - pop singles. Within a short span of time, he recorded a country album, a Christmas album, and a gospel album. None of these projects was likely to produce a hit single. I'm not sure Elvis cared that much about singles in the 70's. Supposedly he had to be talked into recording "Burning Love". Elvis' interest in music was much wider than could be encompassed by 70's top 40 radio. The frustrating part is, when he did get more or less back on track in the singles department after "Burning Love", radio had for the most part moved on, viewing Elvis as an oldies artist. Several of his 73-77 singles could have been top 10 hits if given sufficient promotion and airplay, but radio had moved on to Elton John, John Denver, Olivia Newton-John, KC & the Sunshine Band, the Bee Gees, etc.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Thu Jun 12, 2008 11:46 am

Lonely Summer, while I agree that Rags To Riches, Life, and Merry Christmas Baby weren't going to be mainstream sellers, I'm Leavin' and It's Only Love are fine stabs at a contemporary sound. So I guess two out of five does make it seem like he went a little off track there in his choices. Yet compared to the random nature of his singles from 1964-67 (which included way too many old and previously released recordings) he still provided a fairly contemporary,if at times uncommercial, sound. In short I basically agree with what you said.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sun Jun 29, 2008 5:05 pm

Lonely Summer wrote:I agree that the single choices were poor in the early 70's. Too many slowee job at picking singles. "Steamroller Blues" was a natural, after the success of the "Aloha" broadcast; 'I've Got a Thing About You Baby" should've been a bigger hit - Elvis connected with the Tony Joe White material so well, surprising he didn't record more; "If You Talk in Your Sleep" was kind of different for Elvis, rather adult lyric content, and a kind of Vegas meets Memphis soul sound - certainly not a song you could confuse with the bland ballads. "Promised Land" was his biggest hit of the last 3 or 4 years, and again, fans responded to Elvis covering a classic rock and roll song. So how did "T-R-O-U-B-L-E" miss? Was it seen as kind of a "Promised Land" clone? Okay, similar backbeat, but that's where the similarity ends.

Hi Lonely summer how are you doing today
I agree with you that Elvis should have recorded more Tony Joe white songs. I read in an interview With Tony Joe from 2003 that he was present at the stax sessions where he brought Elvis 3 songs and Elvis recorded 2 of them. Other good songs for Elvis to record of Tony Joe's were ''Even Trolls love Rock n'' roll''
''Backwoods preacher man'' ''Saturday Nite in Oak Groove Louisiana'' ( nice rocker)
I am the only one here that thinks while Elvis was at stax he should have recorded more funky stax soul songs by the Stax staff songwriters like Issac Hayes. It is not surprising to me that Elvis didn't have more luck on the charts in the 70's. The 70's were a strange decade to me. the big hits of that time were
''I think I love you'', ''Tie a yellow ribbon'' ''Don't rock the boat'' ( can't see Elvis doing any of these songs)
''My Ding a ling'' was the biggest hit Chuck Berry ever had!!!
Elvis didn't do to poorly during this time though as he was a major live attraction and was still having top 20 pop hits throughout the decade. Joel Whitburn lists Elvis as the 13th best selling artist of the 70's.
In my oppinion the reason Elvis didn't get airplay on Rock radio was because he started out in the 50's and there was a bais towards that by the programmers of those type of stations, Had Elvis been a rock star from the 60's or 70's "Promised Land'' and T-R-OU-B-L-E would have probably gotten some spins.

Re: SINGLES OF THE '70s

Sun Jun 29, 2008 9:51 pm

Yes, Elvis was doing fine on the charts in the 70's compared to his contemporaries from the 50's. When was the last time Little Richard hit the pop charts? Fats Domino? the Everly Brothers (together or solo)? Dion? Jerry Lee Lewis had a string of country hits, but he only hit the pop charts a couple times in the 70's. He had a version of "Me and Bobby McGee" in the top 40 circa 1972. Other than Chuck's novelty hit with "Ding-a-Ling", he was a stranger to top 40 radio in the 70's. Rick Nelson's records (other than "Garden Party" and "She Belongs to Me") were commercial failures. The most successful acts from the 50's in the 70's, other than Elvis, were Paul Anka and Neil Sedaka, and I wouldn't put them in the same class as Elvis. Thank God Elvis didn't cover "You're Having My Baby". lol (or is it on the same lost tape as "Feelings"?)