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Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sun Jan 11, 2009 3:25 am

excellent review Colin

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sun Jan 11, 2009 9:17 pm

Carl Smith recorded "I really don't wano to know" and the booklet of my CD says it was from '53 (!) I don't know how true it is, but it certainly sounds like it's from around that era.

I have some original reviews from musicpapers about "Elvis country". Shall I post 'em here or is this only for self-written articles?

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sun Jan 11, 2009 9:37 pm

Rocker wrote:Carl Smith recorded "I really don't wano to know" and the booklet of my CD says it was from '53 (!) I don't know how true it is, but it certainly sounds like it's from around that era.

I have some original reviews from musicpapers about "Elvis country". Shall I post 'em here or is this only for self-written articles?


As far as I know it was never released as single in the 50's & 60's by Carl Smith; it was released in 1968 on LP Deep water (Columbia CS 9622) for the first time.

colonel snow

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sun Jan 11, 2009 10:30 pm

colonel snow wrote:
Rocker wrote:Carl Smith recorded "I really don't wano to know" and the booklet of my CD says it was from '53 (!) I don't know how true it is, but it certainly sounds like it's from around that era.

I have some original reviews from musicpapers about "Elvis country". Shall I post 'em here or is this only for self-written articles?


As far as I know it was never released as single in the 50's & 60's by Carl Smith; it was released in 1968 on LP Deep water (Columbia CS 9622) for the first time.

colonel snow



Ok, maybe they misprinted it. Haven't listen to the recording in a while. But still it was recorded before Elvis' version, so maybe it is interesting for some people. Thanks for the correction

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Mon Jan 12, 2009 1:44 am

Rocker wrote:
colonel snow wrote:As far as I know it was never released as single in the 50's & 60's by Carl Smith; it was released in 1968 on LP Deep water (Columbia CS 9622) for the first time.
Ok, maybe they misprinted it.
Haven't listen to the recording in a while.
But still it was recorded before Elvis' version, so maybe it is interesting for some people.
Thanks for the correction


I've added a mention of Carl's version.........

This site doesn't, though:

I Really Don't Want To Know.JPG
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Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Mon Jan 12, 2009 10:58 am

hello collin

after your correction there is an error for There goes my everything:>> not recorded by Eddy Arnold in 1953.

colonel snow

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Mon Jan 12, 2009 12:29 pm

ColinB wrote:I've added a mention of Carl's version.........

This site doesn't, though:

I Really Don't Want To Know.JPG



I have it on a CD, so it exists, trust me :wink:

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Tue Jan 13, 2009 7:00 pm

Thanks ColinB and contributors, indeed a labor of love.

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Tue Jan 13, 2009 8:21 pm

epf wrote:Thanks ColinB and contributors, indeed a labor of love.


You're welcome, epf !

Yes, lots of members have chipped in with further info, mostly about cover versions, and after umpteen edits, it's been knocked into some sort of final shape.

I'm surprised that nobody has any corrections with regards to the 'previously released on xxxxxxx' and 'released for first time here' notes !

Surely they aren't all accurate !

Re: Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:39 pm

Here you have the Spanish artwork. You can spot with real care that under "I'm 10000 years old" on white mini letters it reads (TENGO DIEZ MIL AÑOS) that means exactly I'm 10000 yars old.

Also the "new country sound" logo.
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Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Tue Feb 17, 2009 2:24 am

ColinB, this is a wonderful thread: thank you for starting such a splendid "communal" review.

I find the whole "where did Elvis take his inspiration from" idea quite fascinating and I'd like to contribute a few thoughts and theories regarding this fine, fine album:

Snowbird: I’m pretty sure that Anne Murray’s version was recorded and released in 1969 on her second album, “This Way Is My Way”. It was issued as a single in the summer of 1970 and was probably just slipping out of the charts when Elvis recorded his almost identical version.

Tomorrow Never Comes: Recorded by dozens of artists, but the bolero version that Elvis had in his head was undoubtedly the Glen Campbell take from his second album, “Too Late to Worry, Too Blue to Cry” from 1963: the phrasing is uncannily similar but Elvis throws in a few extra choruses. Worth checking out too, is the Slim Whitman version released in March 1970. Also done as a bolero, it’s really quite stunning. Maybe Elvis heard this and was reminded of Glen’s LP when he went into the Nashville studio

Little Cabin On The Hill: The original is generally known as “Little Cabin Home On The Hill”, and though credited to Monroe and Flatt, Monroe has confirmed that Flatt was the actual composer. Lester Flatt released his own version of the song on the LP “Flatt On Victor” in 1971.

Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On: Big Maybelle or Roy Hall had the first recording of this but I can’t imagine Elvis pacing himself against anyone but Jerry Lee.

Funny How Time Slips Away: I’m sure Elvis knew most of the different versions issued throughout the 60s but the Jimmy Elledge take from 1961 definitely was the one that stayed in his mind: you can hear it without question on the live takes from the 70s (those high notes on “But I remember what I told yoooooou”, for example).

I Really Don’t Want To Know: Elvis may have known the Solomon Burke take but the Les Paul & Mary Ford single (1954) captures the same languid feel that Elvis achieved and gave James Burton something to compete with. This was also recorded by The Flamingoes and Billy Ward & The Dominoes (both 1954). None of the versions that I’ve heard really compare with Elvis’ soulful delivery.

There Goes My Everything: This may have been first recorded by Ferlin Husky for his 1966 LP “I Could Sing All Night” but it’s Greene’s take that Elvis follows. Interesting to hear Elvis’ direction in the studio that he wanted the voices overdubbed at the beginning.

It’s Your Baby: Shirl Milette’s finest moment in Elvis’ catalogue! It’s a shame there wasn’t an opportunity to include Elvis’ next line after the fade out on the master.

The Fool: Clark’s original is more rockabilly than country but Elvis’ take wipes the floor with it either way. Although he’d known the song for years, Elvis may have been reminded of the song by Clark’s 1969 release “The Return Of The Fool”. Credited to Naomi Ford, the song was possibly written by Lee Hazelwood.

Faded Love: I've searched and I've searched ... but I still haven’t managed to find a version even vaguely similar to Elvis’ take.

I Washed My Hands In Muddy Water: The Charlie Rich take almost sounds like “Needle In A Haystack” but It is possible to hear the influence in Elvis’ version. I also have a cracking performance by a Canadian rocker called Ted Daigle which certainly has the same powerhouse feel that Elvis obtained: I can’t find a date on this but it would be fascinating to know if Elvis was familiar with this version.

Make The World Go Away: No doubt here that Elvis was using Eddy Arnold’s template, with maybe a nod in Timi Yuro’s direction.

Thanks again, ColinB: an excellent post and review.

More please!

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Tue Feb 17, 2009 7:11 pm

Well, thanks, George, and it's interesting to read your thoughts on the origin of the songs.

I reckon Elvis absorbed a little of every performance of a song that he heard !

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Tue Feb 17, 2009 7:46 pm

George Smith wrote:It’s Your Baby: Shirl Milette’s finest moment in Elvis’ catalogue! It’s a shame there wasn’t an opportunity to include Elvis’ next line after the fade out on the master......


What was the next line?>

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Tue Feb 17, 2009 10:38 pm

"It's your baby, you rock it: you don't like it, you shove it ..."

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Sun Feb 22, 2009 8:23 pm

My favorite version of "The Fool" was on Jamie Coe's single.

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Mon Feb 23, 2009 4:08 pm

George Smith wrote:Funny How Time Slips Away: I’m sure Elvis knew most of the different versions issued throughout the 60s but the Jimmy Elledge take from 1961 definitely was the one that stayed in his mind: you can hear it without question on the live takes from the 70s (those high notes on “But I remember what I told yoooooou”, for example).



phpBB [video]

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Mon Feb 23, 2009 4:42 pm

Rocker wrote:
George Smith wrote:Funny How Time Slips Away: I’m sure Elvis knew most of the different versions issued throughout the 60s but the Jimmy Elledge take from 1961 definitely was the one that stayed in his mind: you can hear it without question on the live takes from the 70s (those high notes on “But I remember what I told yoooooou”, for example).


Err........................ Jimmy Elledge is a guy is he ?

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Wed Feb 25, 2009 12:53 am

Yup, physically but not vocally.
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Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Wed Feb 25, 2009 1:43 am

George Smith wrote:Yup, physically but not vocally.

Give him long hair and it wouldn't be physically either.

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Thu Mar 05, 2009 12:39 pm

ColinB wrote:18] Little Cabin Home On The Hill Take 1 - 2:04 - 4th June - Slightly longer than the master take, we first got this on Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996.


Mmm, and in superior form. I sure would love to know who the mystery mixing engineer is behind the three Nashville '70 FTD Classic Albums because there are some really questionable things going on. Here we find the harmonica completely mixed out of the sound field - you can sort of hear it in the background as it bleeds through other mics. On Essential IV it is right up there in the mix - as it should be. Oddly the master take as featured on the 70s Box mixed out James Burtons' lead guitar entirely. The big WHY for these is anyone’s guess. Same for Patch It Up on the TTWII FTD. Studio outtakes - James’ guitar is right up there. Studio master - it is (ridiculously) buried.

Beggar’s belief - it really does.

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Thu Mar 05, 2009 3:52 pm

George Smith wrote:ColinB, this is a wonderful thread: thank you for starting such a splendid "communal" review.
I find the whole "where did Elvis take his inspiration from" idea quite fascinating and I'd like to contribute a few thoughts and theories regarding this fine, fine album:


I have finally gotten round to incorporating your extra info into the review !

Thanks again, George !

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Thu Mar 05, 2009 3:56 pm

Matthew wrote:
ColinB wrote:18] Little Cabin Home On The Hill Take 1 - 2:04 - 4th June - Slightly longer than the master take, we first got this on Essential IV - A Hundred Years From Now in 1996.
Mmm, and in superior form. I sure would love to know who the mystery mixing engineer is behind the three Nashville '70 FTD Classic Albums because there are some really questionable things going on....
Beggar’s belief - it really does.


I guess we will always be at the mercy of the personal preferences of the guy doing the mixing at the time !

If he doesn't care for the harmonica [or whatever] or if he feels it doesn't add much to the track - out it goes !

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Thu Mar 05, 2009 11:54 pm

ColinB wrote:If he doesn't care for the harmonica [or whatever] or if he feels it doesn't add much to the track - out it goes !


That really isn't "his" decision to make.

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Fri Mar 06, 2009 2:21 am

Matthew wrote:
ColinB wrote:If he doesn't care for the harmonica [or whatever] or if he feels it doesn't add much to the track - out it goes !
That really isn't "his" decision to make.


Well, no, but it seems to happen that way at times !

Re: I'm 10,000 Years Old - Elvis Country - 1971 & 2008

Thu May 05, 2011 4:35 pm

This is a great album,Elvis is in top form on this one for sure,one of my faves :D