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Something For Everybody Review

Fri Apr 07, 2006 2:06 am

Its simply great ! :)

Re: Something For Everybody Review

Fri Apr 07, 2006 2:09 am

moodyblue1 wrote:Its simply great ! :)

Man, that is one heck of a review.

Fri Apr 07, 2006 2:21 am

Well, it sums it up accurately, anyway. :D

Re: Something For Everybody Review

Fri Apr 07, 2006 5:40 am

moodyblue1 wrote:Its simply great ! :)


So, is it safe to say that you are giving it two thumbs up?

Re: Something For Everybody Review

Fri Apr 07, 2006 9:02 am

elvispresleyfan1935 wrote:
moodyblue1 wrote:Its simply great ! :)

Man, that is one heck of a review.


I must say, I wasn't feelin' so great tonite, but when I logged on and read that reply, I pissed my pants :!: :lol: :wink:

Thu Apr 27, 2006 10:22 pm

Who needs a longer review? I had my copy a bit delayed, but I must admit, this one matches Elvis Is Back! I'm still on the first run, but whoever might have had second thoughs about this album, just get it!
Beautiful all the way! Thank you Ernst! A long time waiting, but it was worth it!!!
I am lost for words now....

Sat Apr 29, 2006 7:41 am

This one could be called a winner! :D

Thu May 11, 2006 1:46 pm

I don't know if it's the post or what, but I only got mine this morning !

OK, you take number experts, I need some help on this one !

[Marie's the name] His Latest Flame

On There's Always Me - Vol.3:

# 0:03 # Take 1 - False start

# 1:18 # Take 1 - False start

# 1:39 # Rehearsal [fades in after start]

On Something For Everybody - FTD

# 0:03 # Take 1 False start

# 0:42 # Take 1 - False start

# 1:39 # Rehearsal [fades in after start]

Spot the difference ?

We seem to be missing something on SFE !

It's the track where he says ""Just play that much back" at the end.

I'm trying to figure it out but my brain is hurting !

Stop Press !

Steve Sholes, on his excellent Master & Session site may have given a vital clue about this !

He say that the 1982 release: EP Collection - Vol.2 has 'part of the LFS' only.

It is the Long False Start that I'm referring to !

So have FTD given us an edited outtake ?

I think we should be told !

Sun May 14, 2006 2:20 pm

ColinB wrote:[Marie's the name] His Latest Flame

On There's Always Me - Vol.3:

# 0:03 # Take 1 - False start

# 1:18 # Take 1 - Long False start

# 1:39 # Rehearsal [fades in after start]

On Something For Everybody - FTD

# 0:03 # Take 1 False start

# 0:42 # Take 1 - Long False start

# 1:39 # Rehearsal [fades in after start]

Spot the difference ?

We seem to be missing something on SFE !

It's the track where he says ""Just play that much back" at the end.

I'm trying to figure it out but my brain is hurting !

Stop Press !

Steve Sholes, on his excellent Master & Session site may have given a vital clue about this !

He say that the 1982 release: EP Collection - Vol.2 has 'part of the LFS' only.

So have FTD given us an edited outtake ?

I think we should be told !


Anyone ?

Mon May 15, 2006 6:53 pm

Similar edits were done on "Elvis Is Back", so that wasn't such a surprise to me.

I do hope that *someday*, when the well is about dry, they'll release complete sessions every now and again, and that they *won't* cut anything out, even if it seems like a tiny bit of dead space - that's part of how it was.

These releases, while it still drives me nuts, I can understand because it's trying to appeal to semi-completists who want a good album flow as well as completists.

Fri Jul 14, 2006 3:19 am

'It's Great' is really all you need for a review but here's ..

EIN’s Something For Everybody - TOP TEN.

‘There’s Always Me’ Tk.4 – Elvis was so right when, before the take, he sings in a funny voice, "Yes Sir, There’s Always Me, This is my song.." (This pre-take comment was tacked onto Take 9 when it was released on ‘Essential Vol.6’). This take was previously on Collector’s Gold but in inferior audio & almost mono in comparison. Listen to this on your headphones as the beautiful spacial stereo here puts you right into the ambience of Studio B. You can hear Elvis’ every breath and observe how he also joins in with the very final note, which he doesn’t on the Master.
Note – The later unreleased multiple false starts are also fascinating since they let us eavesdrop on the recording process. By now it would have been into the early hours of the morning and Elvis is interrupted when the Memphis Mafia walk into the Studio by mistake. Elvis sounds slightly annoyed saying, "What the hell are you all doing? Hey G! We’re in the middle of a take fellas!"

‘Give Me The Right’ Tk.1 – An absolute sensation. This has also been out before on Collector’s Gold but with much poorer audio. Check out the beautiful teasing blues guitar & wailing Boots Randolph sax. The Jordanaires seem to appear out of nowhere @ 01:14 as if their mics are suddenly faded up, & they mess-up their vocals later on! Just as the band stops @ 2:27 Elvis keeps on going, with the band jumping back on for the ride. Elvis’ begging along with the sleazy grinding guitar gives this version a very different feel to the Master. We sure know what Elvis is talking about - "Why make me plead for something you need?" Delicious, rough & bluesy.
Note – The chat at the beginning of the ‘new’ Take 3 false start (very cute but short!) was again previously edited onto the start of Take 2 on ‘Essential Vol.6’. It is nice to have all of Elvis’ comments referring to the take that he was genuinely talking about.

‘I’m Coming Home’ Tk.1&3 - The first recording of the session which nicely sets the scene. After only 15 seconds Elvis messes up & tells the band to "Hold it" while he rehearses the words to himself. Elvis says to A&R man Steve Sholes, "I need a couple of lines Mr. Sholes. Hold it just a second". Take 3 follows and, although it was previously on the ‘Platinum’ box-set, this is from a new generation tape. Before it sounded almost mono & flat but the audio quality here gives it a real edge - and the band & the overall mood sound fantastic. It’s a great start.
Note - ‘New’ Take 5 is another highlight with Elvis messing up the lyric towards the end as he laughs delightfully, "Oh hell man, hold it". The band stops while Boots Randolph throws in a fun sax break. This shows the great humour of the session and is a great new addition.

‘Judy’ Tk. 6&7- Of course Take 1 is the classic, but all these earlier versions feature Elvis playing guitar and obviously enjoying it. Both Takes 6&7 are new and are another great addition. On Take 6 you can hear the chuckle sneaking into Elvis’ voice by the second verse and it soon falls apart with him laughing .. "Bullshit"! Still in good humour he remarks, "I’ve never played (guitar) & had that much trouble over a song. sh*t!" The complete Take 7 is complete & delightful as Floyd Cramer messes up the piano solo with Elvis coming back in 2 beats late.

‘I Want You With Me’ Tk.1 – Released earlier on ‘Collector’s Gold’ this seemed a little weak compared to the sensational Master. However this version features a excellent audio improvement & also includes a little pre-take studio laughter to set the scene. Of course the explosive ending and tighter drum arrangement of the Master hasn’t been worked out as yet, but this is a lovely upgrade which continues right to the complete end with Elvis saying, "Let’s just hear that much back".

‘Little Sister’ Takes 1,2,3,5,6 - When I first heard these outtakes on the ‘EP Collection Vol.2’ I was blown away! This was what I wanted more than any unreleased ‘Britches’ (on A Legendary Vol.2) or Movie Outtakes on the Silver Box-Set. Hearing them again in this quality & context is magnificent. Nothing can beat the, "We’ve got a classic in here" early takes (recently on FTD ‘Studio B 61-64’) as they progress towards the Master. ‘First Take’ #3 (plus false start) "I can hardly hear you" is rough & ready with timings messed up (@01.50) and some sloppy lead guitar - but it is damn funky. Sensational.
Note: The combination of unreleased Takes 7&8/9 provide more eavesdropping. On final Take 9 Hank Garland’s guitar falters a little at times, with Elvis then realising that earlier Take 4 was the best version.

‘His Latest Flame’ Tk. 1,2,5,6 – It’s extraordinary to hear this progress from the very basic Bo Diddley rhythm version to the final single. Take 2 is all rhythm with just Elvis’ vocal providing the melody and the piano only creeping in at points. As Elvis’ says, "It’s a good song, I like it. If it takes 32 hours..." Once again the ‘EP Collection’ Takes 5,6 (with several false starts) are these essential additions for anyone’s collection & in fabulous audio quality. There’s a great feeling as the band work out the tune, "Just don’t get it too fast" Elvis explains to D.J who is not sure of the drum pattern. Elvis then messes the lyric up himself!

‘Good Luck Charm’ Take.1 – Compared to the hard work over ‘Little Sister’/‘His Latest Flame’ this classic number 1 was easy work. Lots of fans who missed out on the ‘EP Collection’ have been waiting a long time for the re-release of this take. With Elvis stating, "If we goof up, just keep going" this is 3 minutes of studio magic. Halfway through the lead guitar slips off melody & mid-song Elvis notes, "Somebody goofed!" - but they do keep going. If you don’t own this, it is sensational.
Note: Unreleased Take 3 is interesting for being too fast and missing that effortless cool-swing of the Master. It breaks down after 1 ½ minutes with a lovely "You’ll be sorry" from bass singer Ray Walker.

‘Anything That’s Part Of You’ Take.1 – Mistakenly released on 1988’s ‘Elvis In Nashville’ this is a beautiful first take. Interestingly the strummed guitar arrangement is very different and was dropped by the second take. For once the arrangement got less complicated as they headed for the Master, with the final blueprint basically set on Take 2. This is a track where you can feel the openness of the studio along with Elvis’ heartache and every intake of breath. Further takes are only messed up by chair squeaks or slightly missed timing by the band, but this certainly proves how Elvis strived for perfection.

‘Gently’/‘Put The Blame On Me’ – These both deserve a credit as ‘Gently’ captures Elvis’ most delicate vocal work, while at the end of the session his throat would be rasping & raw as they rock through ‘Put The Blame On Me’.
The early takes of ‘Gently’ are in a lower key & a slightly slower tempo. It is unlike any song that Elvis had recorded before and was a touch of Folk music that would become so important in the mid-sixties. This was definitely an album track but recorded with such graceful guitar-picking by Hank Garland playing beautifully against Scotty Moore’s similar picking they both match Elvis exceedingly delicate vocal.
The raw early takes of ‘Put The Blame On Me’ are the opposite with Elvis’ voice worn-out which only adds a nice bluesy desperation to the final song of the session.

Of course the sad fact is that ‘Something For Everybody’ like ‘Elvis Is Back’ would sell in minimal numbers compared to ‘Blue Hawaii’ or ‘G.I Blues’ and, with his hand firmly on his wallet, The Colonel would choose financial benefit over artist merit.

Full details, sleeve photos etc are here

Cheers
Piers

Sun Jul 16, 2006 5:54 pm

PiersEIN wrote:‘Judy’ Tk. 6&7- Of course Take 1 is the classic, but all these earlier versions feature Elvis playing guitar and obviously enjoying it. Both Takes 6&7 are new and are another great addition. On Take 6 you can hear the chuckle sneaking into Elvis’ voice by the second verse and it soon falls apart with him laughing .. "Bullshit"! Still in good humour he remarks, "I’ve never played (guitar) & had that much trouble over a song. sh*t!" The complete Take 7 is complete & delightful as Floyd Cramer messes up the piano solo with Elvis coming back in 2 beats late.

Cheers
Piers

Great review as always Piers, but you forgot to mention about Judy - Take 7 being spliced on this release. The real Take 7 is a long false start and Elvis doesn't complete the take.

What we get here is the complete "Take 7" right up to "Oh please …" (1:52) and then the song is spliced! What we should get from here is Elvis breaking down saying "Oh no, man". On the FTD from this point we get "Come back I promise always to be true, oh Judy, there'll never be anyone else dear but you" from "Take 7" (1:10 - 1:27), and then "Oh Judy, there'll never be anyone else" (looped again from 1:16 - 1:24), and then "dear but you" from "Take 8" (last few seconds of the Master).

Mon Jul 17, 2006 1:29 am

Keith F wrote:
PiersEIN wrote:‘Judy’ Tk. 6&7- Of course Take 1 is the classic, but all these earlier versions feature Elvis playing guitar and obviously enjoying it. Both Takes 6&7 are new and are another great addition. On Take 6 you can hear the chuckle sneaking into Elvis’ voice by the second verse and it soon falls apart with him laughing .. "Bullshit"! Still in good humour he remarks, "I’ve never played (guitar) & had that much trouble over a song. sh*t!" The complete Take 7 is complete & delightful as Floyd Cramer messes up the piano solo with Elvis coming back in 2 beats late.

Cheers
Piers

Great review as always Piers, but you forgot to mention about Judy - Take 7 being spliced on this release. The real Take 7 is a long false start and Elvis doesn't complete the take.

What we get here is the complete "Take 7" right up to "Oh please …" (1:52) and then the song is spliced! What we should get from here is Elvis breaking down saying "Oh no, man". On the FTD from this point we get "Come back I promise always to be true, oh Judy, there'll never be anyone else dear but you" from "Take 7" (1:10 - 1:27), and then "Oh Judy, there'll never be anyone else" (looped again from 1:16 - 1:24), and then "dear but you" from "Take 8" (last few seconds of the Master).


Just how did you figure this sh*t out?! :shock: :D

Anyway, I hope they won't mess with the outtakes in the future. The whole point with outtakes is to hear Elvis and the band working in the studio. There is no point in trying to make the outtakes sound better or more complete by doctoring the tapes. After all, if I want to hear a perfect "Judy", I'll listen to the master.

Keith Richards, Jr.

Mon Jul 17, 2006 3:39 am

Well, I did, thank you very much.

I chained dozens of samples together and posted at 320 kbs.

The thread's still there any time you want it.

SOME THING FOR EVERY BODY - REVIEW .

Sun Aug 06, 2006 7:29 pm

PiersEIN wrote:'It's Great' is really all you need for a review but here's ..

EIN’s Something For Everybody - TOP TEN.

‘There’s Always Me’ Tk.4 – Elvis was so right when, before the take, he sings in a funny voice, "Yes Sir, There’s Always Me, This is my song.." (This pre-take comment was tacked onto Take 9 when it was released on ‘Essential Vol.6’). This take was previously on Collector’s Gold but in inferior audio & almost mono in comparison. Listen to this on your headphones as the beautiful spacial stereo here puts you right into the ambience of Studio B. You can hear Elvis’ every breath and observe how he also joins in with the very final note, which he doesn’t on the Master.
Note – The later unreleased multiple false starts are also fascinating since they let us eavesdrop on the recording process. By now it would have been into the early hours of the morning and Elvis is interrupted when the Memphis Mafia walk into the Studio by mistake. Elvis sounds slightly annoyed saying, "What the hell are you all doing? Hey G! We’re in the middle of a take fellas!"

‘Give Me The Right’ Tk.1 – An absolute sensation. This has also been out before on Collector’s Gold but with much poorer audio. Check out the beautiful teasing blues guitar & wailing Boots Randolph sax. The Jordanaires seem to appear out of nowhere @ 01:14 as if their mics are suddenly faded up, & they mess-up their vocals later on! Just as the band stops @ 2:27 Elvis keeps on going, with the band jumping back on for the ride. Elvis’ begging along with the sleazy grinding guitar gives this version a very different feel to the Master. We sure know what Elvis is talking about - "Why make me plead for something you need?" Delicious, rough & bluesy.
Note – The chat at the beginning of the ‘new’ Take 3 false start (very cute but short!) was again previously edited onto the start of Take 2 on ‘Essential Vol.6’. It is nice to have all of Elvis’ comments referring to the take that he was genuinely talking about.

‘I’m Coming Home’ Tk.1&3 - The first recording of the session which nicely sets the scene. After only 15 seconds Elvis messes up & tells the band to "Hold it" while he rehearses the words to himself. Elvis says to A&R man Steve Sholes, "I need a couple of lines Mr. Sholes. Hold it just a second". Take 3 follows and, although it was previously on the ‘Platinum’ box-set, this is from a new generation tape. Before it sounded almost mono & flat but the audio quality here gives it a real edge - and the band & the overall mood sound fantastic. It’s a great start.
Note - ‘New’ Take 5 is another highlight with Elvis messing up the lyric towards the end as he laughs delightfully, "Oh hell man, hold it". The band stops while Boots Randolph throws in a fun sax break. This shows the great humour of the session and is a great new addition.

‘Judy’ Tk. 6&7- Of course Take 1 is the classic, but all these earlier versions feature Elvis playing guitar and obviously enjoying it. Both Takes 6&7 are new and are another great addition. On Take 6 you can hear the chuckle sneaking into Elvis’ voice by the second verse and it soon falls apart with him laughing .. "Bullshit"! Still in good humour he remarks, "I’ve never played (guitar) & had that much trouble over a song. sh*t!" The complete Take 7 is complete & delightful as Floyd Cramer messes up the piano solo with Elvis coming back in 2 beats late.

‘I Want You With Me’ Tk.1 – Released earlier on ‘Collector’s Gold’ this seemed a little weak compared to the sensational Master. However this version features a excellent audio improvement & also includes a little pre-take studio laughter to set the scene. Of course the explosive ending and tighter drum arrangement of the Master hasn’t been worked out as yet, but this is a lovely upgrade which continues right to the complete end with Elvis saying, "Let’s just hear that much back".

‘Little Sister’ Takes 1,2,3,5,6 - When I first heard these outtakes on the ‘EP Collection Vol.2’ I was blown away! This was what I wanted more than any unreleased ‘Britches’ (on A Legendary Vol.2) or Movie Outtakes on the Silver Box-Set. Hearing them again in this quality & context is magnificent. Nothing can beat the, "We’ve got a classic in here" early takes (recently on FTD ‘Studio B 61-64’) as they progress towards the Master. ‘First Take’ #3 (plus false start) "I can hardly hear you" is rough & ready with timings messed up (@01.50) and some sloppy lead guitar - but it is damn funky. Sensational.
Note: The combination of unreleased Takes 7&8/9 provide more eavesdropping. On final Take 9 Hank Garland’s guitar falters a little at times, with Elvis then realising that earlier Take 4 was the best version.

‘His Latest Flame’ Tk. 1,2,5,6 – It’s extraordinary to hear this progress from the very basic Bo Diddley rhythm version to the final single. Take 2 is all rhythm with just Elvis’ vocal providing the melody and the piano only creeping in at points. As Elvis’ says, "It’s a good song, I like it. If it takes 32 hours..." Once again the ‘EP Collection’ Takes 5,6 (with several false starts) are these essential additions for anyone’s collection & in fabulous audio quality. There’s a great feeling as the band work out the tune, "Just don’t get it too fast" Elvis explains to D.J who is not sure of the drum pattern. Elvis then messes the lyric up himself!

‘Good Luck Charm’ Take.1 – Compared to the hard work over ‘Little Sister’/‘His Latest Flame’ this classic number 1 was easy work. Lots of fans who missed out on the ‘EP Collection’ have been waiting a long time for the re-release of this take. With Elvis stating, "If we goof up, just keep going" this is 3 minutes of studio magic. Halfway through the lead guitar slips off melody & mid-song Elvis notes, "Somebody goofed!" - but they do keep going. If you don’t own this, it is sensational.
Note: Unreleased Take 3 is interesting for being too fast and missing that effortless cool-swing of the Master. It breaks down after 1 ½ minutes with a lovely "You’ll be sorry" from bass singer Ray Walker.

‘Anything That’s Part Of You’ Take.1 – Mistakenly released on 1988’s ‘Elvis In Nashville’ this is a beautiful first take. Interestingly the strummed guitar arrangement is very different and was dropped by the second take. For once the arrangement got less complicated as they headed for the Master, with the final blueprint basically set on Take 2. This is a track where you can feel the openness of the studio along with Elvis’ heartache and every intake of breath. Further takes are only messed up by chair squeaks or slightly missed timing by the band, but this certainly proves how Elvis strived for perfection.

‘Gently’/‘Put The Blame On Me’ – These both deserve a credit as ‘Gently’ captures Elvis’ most delicate vocal work, while at the end of the session his throat would be rasping & raw as they rock through ‘Put The Blame On Me’.
The early takes of ‘Gently’ are in a lower key & a slightly slower tempo. It is unlike any song that Elvis had recorded before and was a touch of Folk music that would become so important in the mid-sixties. This was definitely an album track but recorded with such graceful guitar-picking by Hank Garland playing beautifully against Scotty Moore’s similar picking they both match Elvis exceedingly delicate vocal.
The raw early takes of ‘Put The Blame On Me’ are the opposite with Elvis’ voice worn-out which only adds a nice bluesy desperation to the final song of the session.

Of course the sad fact is that ‘Something For Everybody’ like ‘Elvis Is Back’ would sell in minimal numbers compared to ‘Blue Hawaii’ or ‘G.I Blues’ and, with his hand firmly on his wallet, The Colonel would choose financial benefit over artist merit.

Full details, sleeve photos etc are here

Cheers
Piers



great review Piers - :wink:


i enjoyed reading this review.
many thanx . :wink: :wink: