Off Topic Messages

Charity begins at home?

Thu Apr 17, 2014 10:47 pm

After many years of donating to certain Charities i now feel i don't want to give money to any Charity as i feel im just being taken for a mug.

Every now and then, i get a person knock on my door with a identity badge and introduce themselves and explain that they are collecting for a certain charity and in the past i have donated a small fee to think i am doing something good but that has now stopped for a few reasons.

Firstly, i have an issue with anyone asking me for my bank/card details who knocks at my door as it could be a con and even if it is legit,the people that work for these charities have a way of talking you into giving money when you don't feel you want to and when you sign up for these charities they hardly ever appreciate the amount of money you give.

I have found that after awhile they ring you up asking you for more money.

Then also, the amount of money paid out to the top bosses of some of these charities are ridiculous, some getting over £100,000+ a year. How can they justify that kind of income?
I work 50 hours a week and get around £25,000 and im asked to give a small donation just so i can contribute to these top bosses big houses and luxury holidays as thats where their wages come from, donations.
Surely they can live quite comfortably on around £30,000-£40,000 a year so thats around at least £60,000 that the general public has donated thinking its going to a good cause when in fact, its going into the pockets of these Chief Executives.

A Charity Worker for Barnardos knocked at my door tonight and he introduced himself and before he could say any more i said 'If you want money off me the answers No' and he still tried to get money off me and i had my phone in my hand getting onto the internet and found the name of the Chief Executive of Barnardos (who the Charity Worker didn't know) and how much he gets a year and asked him if you want me to fund his luxury lifestyle when im not earning anything near this Chief Executive is earning.
He was lost for words so i just said 'bye'.

I still put the odd £1 into collection boxes (like for Poppy Day) when i want to and sometimes give spare change to homeless people in my area but i feel so many Charities nowadays put so much pressure on getting donations off you and should not be allowed to make you feel guilty when you don't want to donate.

Am i a bad person for feeling this way and refusing to donate to Charities for the reasons above or have i put a valid case to not donate?
What are the other members feelings towards donating to Charities?

Re: Charity begins at home?

Thu Apr 17, 2014 11:06 pm

Bodie wrote:After many years of donating to certain Charities i now feel i don't want to to give money to any Charity as i feel im just being taken for a mug.

Every now and then, i get a person knock on my door with a identity badge and introduce themselves and explain that they are donating to a certain charity and in the past i have donated a small fee to think i am doing something good but that has now stopped for a few reasons.


I know what you mean, similar things happen where I live. Unless these people have something (like a flyer) that I may take home and read, and then decide if I want to donate, I tell them "No, thank you."

There are still plenty of worthy, legitimate charitable organizations out there, for needy families, food banks, animal shelters and the like, and I hope you do not shun them because of this.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Thu Apr 17, 2014 11:18 pm

Bodie wrote:After many years of donating to certain Charities i now feel i don't want to give money to any Charity as i feel im just being taken for a mug.

Every now and then, i get a person knock on my door with a identity badge and introduce themselves and explain that they are collecting for a certain charity and in the past i have donated a small fee to think i am doing something good but that has now stopped for a few reasons.

Firstly, i have an issue with anyone asking me for my bank/card details who knocks at my door as it could be a con and even if it is legit,the people that work for these charities have a way of talking you into giving money when you don't feel you want to and when you sign up for these charities they hardly ever appreciate the amount of money you give.

I have found that after awhile they ring you up asking you for more money.

Then also, the amount of money paid out to the top bosses of some of these charities are ridiculous, some getting over £100,000+ a year. How can they justify that kind of income?
I work 50 hours a week and get around £25,000 and im asked to give a small donation just so i can contribute to these top bosses big houses and luxury holidays as thats where their wages come from, donations.
Surely they can live quite comfortably on around £30,000-£40,000 a year so thats around at least £60,000 that the general public has donated thinking its going to a good cause when in fact, its going into the pockets of these Chief Executives.

A Charity Worker for Barnardos knocked at my door tonight and he introduced himself and before he could say any more i said 'If you want money off me the answers No' and he still tried to get money off me and i had my phone in my hand getting onto the internet and found the name of the Chief Executive of Barnardos (who the Charity Worker didn't know) and how much he gets a year and asked him if you want me to fund his luxury lifestyle when im not earning anything near this Chief Executive is earning.
He was lost for words so i just said 'bye'.

I still put the odd £1 into collection boxes (like for Poppy Day) when i want to and sometimes give spare change to homeless people in my area but i feel so many Charities nowadays put so much pressure on getting donations off you and should not be allowed to make you feel guilty when you don't want to donate.

Am i a bad person for feeling this way and refusing to donate to Charities for the reasons above or have i put a valid case to not donate?
What are the other members feelings towards donating to Charities?


It's a no-win situation all around. If the charities offered only £30,000 to the chief executive, they wouldn't be able to employ anyone with the necessary expertise and experience to do the job because they could earn four-forty times that amount of money elsewhere. When you consider the boss of Co-op was quoted today as getting £1.6m per year, £100,000 a year for the boss of a large charitable organisation such as the Red Cross etc is literally peanuts. The bosses are working for (at most) around 10-30% of what they could get elsewhere. If you want someone to do the job who has the experience and expertise to make sure it is run properly then you have to pay at least a reasonable wage - otherwise you attract people without those skills, the charity goes bankrupt and everything donated goes to waste.

That said, I agree the amount of people coming around the door has increased significantly - but considering the amount of budget cuts in this country, it's hardly surprising that charities are trying to get every penny they can. The unfortunate situation is that they would get more if we could give cash - but too many muggings of those collecting for charities have forced the change to direct debit schemes.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Thu Apr 17, 2014 11:28 pm

Bodie wrote:Firstly, i have an issue with anyone asking me for my bank/card details who knocks at my door as it could be a con and even if it is legit,the people that work for these charities have a way of talking you into giving money when you don't feel you want to and when you sign up for these charities they hardly ever appreciate the amount of money you give.


I don't like that either. That's why I usually don't donate in that situation. Almost every day when I go for a walk on my lunch break in San Francisco and I am approached by a street fundraiser. I always politely decline but sometimes they'll make snide comments that I find extremely irksome. (I'm not sure why they think that tactic will work.) I admit that I have been reduced to pretending like I'm talking on my phone in order to avoid their spiel. My general rule is that I don't donate to charities unless I have done extensive research on the organizations. So I'm not going to blindly donate to someone on the street or someone who knocks on my door.

My wife and I donate loads of money each year to a variety of charities but we feel confident that the organizations we donate to are legit.

Bodie wrote:Am i a bad person for feeling this way and refusing to donate to Charities for the reasons above or have i put a valid case to not donate?
What are the other members feelings towards donating to Charities?


Of course not! You're sensible!

Re: Charity begins at home?

Thu Apr 17, 2014 11:31 pm

Good points and i appreciate your replies.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Thu Apr 17, 2014 11:43 pm

Basically, the way forward is probably to pick your charities and stick to them as and when you are in a position to or feel like giving. It's probably true to say that all of the ones that end up on your doorstep are worthwhile to one degree or another - but you can't do everything, even if you wanted to.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Thu Apr 17, 2014 11:56 pm

poormadpeter wrote:Basically, the way forward is probably to pick your charities and stick to them as and when you are in a position to or feel like giving. It's probably true to say that all of the ones that end up on your doorstep are worthwhile to one degree or another - but you can't do everything, even if you wanted to.


Yes, i agree.

Its just annoying when you get pressured into giving money to a charity when you feel you don't want to at a particular time.

Like when you come home from a hard days work, put your feet up and watch TV when there is a knock at the door.

I can understand it from the Charities point of view as well.

As you said, we can't do everything.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Fri Apr 18, 2014 12:43 am

As someone who has a small, struggling non-profit, and who dealt with a huge one, I can just say "do the research."

Make sure there are no conflicts of interest, that big shots haven't gone to prison, that funds and goods have not been misappropriated. These things DO happen. Do your research. I know someone who does computer work for the Red Cross, and they are all right. In an emergency, that's the place to go.

There is another large organization, with which I have had experience, and that's a different story. You will have to look things up on your own. (But when a large charity rolls a steamroller over a small one, has serious conflicts of interest, misappropriates donations, and displaces local low-income residents for a "community center" that was never built, THAT'S A PROBLEM!)

No names. Look it up. Always look it up anyway.

rjm

Sent via mobile

Re: Charity begins at home?

Fri Apr 18, 2014 12:52 am

My form of charity....a bowl of chicken soup given directly to a homeless person. No money....no booze...just something that they can really use....no middle man involved.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Fri Apr 18, 2014 1:49 am

TCB-FAN wrote:My form of charity....a bowl of chicken soup given directly to a homeless person. No money....no booze...just something that they can really use....no middle man involved.


When I lived with my parents, it was in a village, but when I moved out I moved into the city. I was about 21 or so and, sadly, couldn't carry bowls of soup around with me - or at least hadn't worked out to manage that. But every Christmas Eve for the first three or four years, I'd go to McDonald's and buy five meals and give them to the homeless near where I was living. Not the most healthy thing for them, but hot food nonetheless. Then, one year, I did this and gave a guy his meal, and he shouted after me when I left him that, if I did it again, that I should get him one without tomato sauce because he didn't like it. I never did that little ritual again.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Fri Apr 18, 2014 2:11 am

poormadpeter wrote:
TCB-FAN wrote:My form of charity....a bowl of chicken soup given directly to a homeless person. No money....no booze...just something that they can really use....no middle man involved.


When I lived with my parents, it was in a village, but when I moved out I moved into the city. I was about 21 or so and, sadly, couldn't carry bowls of soup around with me - or at least hadn't worked out to manage that. But every Christmas Eve for the first three or four years, I'd go to McDonald's and buy five meals and give them to the homeless near where I was living. Not the most healthy thing for them, but hot food nonetheless. Then, one year, I did this and gave a guy his meal, and he shouted after me when I left him that, if I did it again, that I should get him one without tomato sauce because he didn't like it. I never did that little ritual again.



"No good deed goes unpunished" as the old saying goes. :wink:

Re: Charity begins at home?

Fri Apr 18, 2014 3:21 am

I do a lot of good work for charity, but I don't like to talk about it.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Sat Apr 19, 2014 2:05 pm

mike edwards66 wrote:I do a lot of good work for charity, but I don't like to talk about it.

I do a lot of work with unmarried mothers. Just getting them started.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Sun Apr 20, 2014 1:51 am

The Pirate wrote:
mike edwards66 wrote:I do a lot of good work for charity, but I don't like to talk about it.

I do a lot of work with unmarried mothers. Just getting them started.

Dirty work, but someone's got to do it :wink:

These guys do a lot of good work for charity, but they don't like to sing about it.
phpBB [video]

Last edited by mike edwards66 on Mon Apr 21, 2014 12:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Sun Apr 20, 2014 10:48 am

mike edwards66 wrote:
The Pirate wrote:
mike edwards66 wrote:I do a lot of good work for charity, but I don't like to talk about it.

I do a lot of work with unmarried mothers. Just getting them started.

Dirty work, but someone's got to do it :wink:

These guy's do a lot of good work for charity, but they don't like to sing about it.
phpBB [video]


Mine was pinched from Steve Martin.

Re: Charity begins at home?

Sun Apr 20, 2014 5:47 pm

Bodie wrote:After many years of donating to certain Charities i now feel i don't want to give money to any Charity as i feel im just being taken for a mug.

Every now and then, i get a person knock on my door with a identity badge and introduce themselves and explain that they are collecting for a certain charity and in the past i have donated a small fee to think i am doing something good but that has now stopped for a few reasons.

Firstly, i have an issue with anyone asking me for my bank/card details who knocks at my door as it could be a con and even if it is legit,the people that work for these charities have a way of talking you into giving money when you don't feel you want to and when you sign up for these charities they hardly ever appreciate the amount of money you give.

I have found that after awhile they ring you up asking you for more money.

Then also, the amount of money paid out to the top bosses of some of these charities are ridiculous, some getting over £100,000+ a year. How can they justify that kind of income?
I work 50 hours a week and get around £25,000 and im asked to give a small donation just so i can contribute to these top bosses big houses and luxury holidays as thats where their wages come from, donations.
Surely they can live quite comfortably on around £30,000-£40,000 a year so thats around at least £60,000 that the general public has donated thinking its going to a good cause when in fact, its going into the pockets of these Chief Executives.

A Charity Worker for Barnardos knocked at my door tonight and he introduced himself and before he could say any more i said 'If you want money off me the answers No' and he still tried to get money off me and i had my phone in my hand getting onto the internet and found the name of the Chief Executive of Barnardos (who the Charity Worker didn't know) and how much he gets a year and asked him if you want me to fund his luxury lifestyle when im not earning anything near this Chief Executive is earning.
He was lost for words so i just said 'bye'.

I still put the odd £1 into collection boxes (like for Poppy Day) when i want to and sometimes give spare change to homeless people in my area but i feel so many Charities nowadays put so much pressure on getting donations off you and should not be allowed to make you feel guilty when you don't want to donate.

Am i a bad person for feeling this way and refusing to donate to Charities for the reasons above or have i put a valid case to not donate?
What are the other members feelings towards donating to Charities?


No. You're not a bad person. You're just frustrated like many of us feeling the same way. Like poormadpeter said, "Considering the amount of budget cuts in this country, it's hardly surprising that charities are trying to get every penny they can." In US we're seeing the same happening throughout the country as well. I do volunteer work at our local hospital and will donate through the volunteers group. This way, I know what the money is being used for and can see the results too.