Off Topic Messages

Now That's What I Call Dancing

Sun Apr 13, 2014 2:20 am

If the biography of the Nicholas Brothers was ever to be filmed, their dance moves would have to be computer generated, because no one now, could emulate them. So said, the late entertainer and choreographer, Gregory Hines.

Fred Astaire said, that this 'Jumpin' Jive' number (starts at approx. 1:30), from the movie 'Stormy Weather', was the greatest movie dance sequence he had ever seen. To see them leapfrog down a flight of stairs, completing each step with a split, is quite simply breathtaking.

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Michael Jackson was a student of theirs. Here he is dancing with them in '77, looking pretty cool, in white taps !

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Last edited by mike edwards66 on Mon Apr 14, 2014 12:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Sun Apr 13, 2014 3:04 am

Wow, and ouch. Just incredible, thank you :D

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Sun Apr 13, 2014 3:15 am

Mountain Misst wrote:Wow, and ouch. Just incredible, thank you :D

Glad you liked it, those guys were amazing.

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Sun Apr 13, 2014 11:02 am

Many thanks! They were remarkable.

rjm

Sent via mobile

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Sun Apr 13, 2014 11:05 am

Astonishing, thank you.

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Tue Apr 15, 2014 5:20 pm

Those boys were amazing!!

I'm also a big Astaire fan! This scene is my favourite of his! Inspired stuff! He was a legend (and had an AMAZING voice too and a fabulously classic song repertoire!)

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Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Tue Apr 15, 2014 8:30 pm

I've long been a fan and an admirer of the Nicholas brothers. They were incredible dancers, not just in their acrobatics and gravity-defying movements, but in the intricacies of everything they done. I especially like their routine with Gene Kelly in The Pirate. I'm also a big fan of Fred Astaire. He truly was one of the greats whose body of work remains hugely impressive, highly influential and tremendously entertaining. It shouldn't be underestimated just how much Astaire meant to the movies and popular song along with his credentials as a dancer.

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Wed Apr 16, 2014 2:09 am

Even when just walking, Fred Astaire gave the impressionn that he was gliding on air.

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Thu Apr 17, 2014 2:25 am

Stanley Donen said of Astaire,"I have seen no one less encumbered by gravity than Fred Astaire". What a truly great quote.

Now, admittedly, this is not for the purists, but I find I am unable to take my eyes off the screen, amazed at how often the music fits the movements. Enjoy:

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Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Thu Apr 17, 2014 8:25 am

mike edwards66 wrote:Stanley Donen said of Astaire,"I have seen no one less encumbered by gravity than Fred Astaire". What a truly great quote.

Now, admittedly, this is not for the purists, but I find I am unable to take my eyes off the screen, amazed at how often the music fits the movements. Enjoy:

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Wow! Thank you, Mike!

That is so brilliant, on many levels!

I'm breathless!

rjm

Sent via mobile

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Fri Apr 18, 2014 3:28 am

rjm wrote:Wow! Thank you, Mike!

That is so brilliant, on many levels!

I'm breathless!

Glad you liked it, it's easy to see, the inspiration that Astaire was to Jackson.

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Fri Apr 18, 2014 3:41 am

mike edwards66 wrote:
rjm wrote:Wow! Thank you, Mike!

That is so brilliant, on many levels!

I'm breathless!

Glad you liked it, it's easy to see, the inspiration that Astaire was to Jackson.



That part surprised me, I didn't know, Mike, then, of course, it makes all the sense in the world. Why wouldn't Jackson have looked to the best?

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Fri Apr 18, 2014 3:43 am

mike edwards66 wrote:Even when just walking, Fred Astaire gave the impressionn that he was gliding on air.



Who could compare, in a similar genre, these days?

Seems that the art, of being light on one's feet is lost?

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Fri Apr 18, 2014 9:05 am

Mountain Misst wrote:
mike edwards66 wrote:
rjm wrote:Wow! Thank you, Mike!

That is so brilliant, on many levels!

I'm breathless!

Glad you liked it, it's easy to see, the inspiration that Astaire was to Jackson.



That part surprised me, I didn't know, Mike, then, of course, it makes all the sense in the world. Why wouldn't Jackson have looked to the best?



Even more evident when you watch this...

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Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Fri Apr 18, 2014 10:52 am

So many things are being lost. I know everything is "instantaneous" today: everything comes to you at the speed of light. And we benefit in many ways.

But some things are worth waiting for. This applies to music, dance, almost everything. Michael Jackson worked very hard incorporating all that preceeded him. Despite the dreadful treatment by his father, he nevertheless wanted to learn, to work hard, to be the best he could. Even though he was just nine when he made his first record ("Big Boy" on the little Steeltown label), years of work went into it. He was not an overnight sensation, despite his age.

His adoration of old-time performers like Astaire was part of it: he studied! Not formally, but he did.

Nowadays, some kid films himself with his IPhone, and boom! He's a star! (No names. ;) )

rjm

Sent via mobile

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Sun Apr 20, 2014 1:53 am

TJ wrote:Even more evident when you watch this...

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Thanks TJ, I enjoyed that very much.

Re: Now That's What I Call Dancing

Sun Apr 20, 2014 2:46 am

mike edwards66 wrote:
TJ wrote:Even more evident when you watch this...

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Thanks TJ, I enjoyed that very much.


I second that emotion!

Even lyrics!

It was great for someone his age - a "late Boomer" - to have fallen in love with the work of performers so far before his time. He was a member of the first co-hort "too young for the 60s." (Just 11 on December 31, 1969.)

That's perhaps something else we've lost. Most (not all) members here are either late Boomers or Gen-Xers, and it almost feels as though we are the last of the rock era fans. Let alone going back before!

I would hope young people today will take a good look back as we see in this example.

rjm

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