Off Topic Messages

Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Sun Feb 02, 2014 10:31 pm

Breaking news just now; from an apparent overdose. He was an incredibly gifted actor and this is quite devastating news.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Sun Feb 02, 2014 10:39 pm

greystoke wrote:Breaking news just now; from an apparent overdose. He was an incredibly gifted actor and this is quite devastating news.


Very sad indeed.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Sun Feb 02, 2014 10:40 pm

greystoke wrote:Breaking news just now; from an apparent overdose. He was an incredibly gifted actor and this is quite devastating news.


We just read about it here. Hoffman never turned in a bad performance on film. He leaves three young children. It is a very sad day for anyone who loves movies, or had affection for this man and his great talent.

Among others, he was superb in these motion pictures:

"Boogie Nights" (1997)
"The Big Lebowski" (1998)
"Magnolia" (1999)
"The Talented Mr. Ripley" (1999)
"Almost Famous" (2000)
"Punch-Drunk Love" (2002)

For those who don't know him, here is a resource to learn more:

Philip Seymour Hoffman
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Seymour_Hoffman

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Sun Feb 02, 2014 10:41 pm

greystoke wrote:Breaking news just now; from an apparent overdose. He was an incredibly gifted actor and this is quite devastating news.


Sad to learn about this. Thanks for posting, greystoke.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:06 pm

Such a great actor.So sad.

norrie

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:24 pm

fabulous actor who elevated everything he appeared in, sad news indeed.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:23 am

Such a great actor who struggled with addiction. So sad.


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Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:52 am

He was fantastic in "Along Came Polly" with Ben Stiller, Alec Baldwin, Jennifer Aniston, and Debra Messing. Also liked him in "Moneyball" with Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:54 am

He was only 46. What a waste. The man was brilliant. Very sad news. :cry: RIP Mr. Hoffman.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Mon Feb 03, 2014 3:56 am

This is truly sad news. I am a big fan of PSH's work. IMO he was a classic Hollywood actor in every sense of the word but he wasn't caught up in the notoriety of Hollywood. He was a master at his craft with so much more left to give. He will be sorely missed on the big screen. Leaving behind his wife and 3 children... :(

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Mon Feb 03, 2014 2:00 pm

Very sad news ,RIP

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Tue Feb 04, 2014 2:02 am

This is a well-written look at the man, his wonderful talent and diverse acting career, published today.


Hoffman's mastery impossible to ignore
By Mick LaSalle | San Francisco Chronicle
Monday, February 3, 2014

120914_The Master_PS Hoffman.JPG
Philip Seymour Hoffman was nominated for a best supporting actor Oscar as an L. Ron Hubbard-like figure in "The Master."
Photo: Phil Bray, The Weinstein Company


They say the graveyards are full of indispensable men, and yet it's hard not to see the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman as a genuine disaster for motion pictures and for the art of screen acting. To look back on what this consummate American actor accomplished just in the past 15 years is to imagine what he might have done over the next 25 or 30 - except we can't even have the satisfaction of imagining: Hoffman, who was found dead in his New York apartment Sunday, was always surprising us.

An unprepossessing boy-man caught between types, he started out not looking like anybody or like anything in particular. He turned that into an advantage, by showing he could play everything. His features were raw, his body almost uncouth, and yet he was capable of remarkable delicacy. A real artist, his center was impossible to locate because it was always different, and changing. He could be light or heavy, warm or cold.

What remained consistent was his power of thought, which he brought to bear on all his great work, including, notably, the title role in "Capote," one of the most astonishing and sublime chameleon performances in American cinema.

There are rare actors such as this - people whom audiences want to look at, people audiences can't help wanting to look at, even if they don't quite know why. In the case of Hoffman, his opacity was an odd gift - a quality present even in his throwaway performance, such as in "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire." With Hoffman, we never really knew what he was thinking - but we always understood that he was thinking, and that it was something interesting and mesmerizing and slightly out of reach.

He could portray enormous tenderness, and yet he most often played people who were either alienated or had re-created themselves out of profound sense of alienation. Indeed, if you're looking for a common thread in the work of this versatile and multifaceted actor, that might be it. From the shy teacher in "25th Hour" to the self-styled religious leader in "The Master" to the second violinist in "A Late Quartet," he played lonely men who had made some uneasy accommodation with the surrounding world.

He understood flaws. He most certainly understood darkness, particularly the kind of darkness that could restructure itself as creativity. Think of him as the political fixer in "The Ides of March" or as the volatile government agent in "Charlie Wilson's War." One must assume this darkness was also within Hoffman himself and this disturbance was part of his gift. For sure, he often exuded a lack of ease in his own skin, a submerged self-hatred. Was this real? One sensed it was, though perhaps it was just the movies. In any case, the quality of his intelligence was major, and unmistakable.

But all this summing up is too easy - and inadequate. We can go all day saying true and even clever things about Philip Seymour Hoffman, but none of what we say will capture one minute of what he brought to the screen. There are no reasons for an artist of this magnitude, only imperfect and incomplete observations surrounding him, interesting points we might say to each other. But in the end, only Hoffman can speak for Hoffman, and he will continue to speak, in the indelible moments he brought to his best movies.

These are too many to name, but just a few, in random order: his embarrassed interaction with the teenage Anna Paquin in the bar scene in "25th Hour"; the interrogation interview with Joaquin Phoenix in "The Master"; the scene in "A Late Quartet," in which he becomes absolutely terrified when his wife catches him with another woman; his funny telephone scenes as Lester Bangs in "Almost Famous"; his tantrum in "Charlie Wilson's War"; his wounded betrayal in "The Ides of March"; and his mysterious, impenetrable sense of injury in "Doubt."

There are more - many more. I'm loath to stop listing them, because I'm loath to say goodbye. Forty-six years is barely more than half a life, less than half of a career. Yet Philip Seymour Hoffman leaves behind riches.


http://www.sfchronicle.com/movies/article/Philip-Seymour-Hoffman-s-mastery-impossible-to-5198721.php

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Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Tue Feb 04, 2014 2:15 am

According to paramedics on the scene, a hypodermic needle was found still stuck on his arm. They also found envelopes filled with heroin in his suite. Drug addiction is such a terrible thing to endure. It can happen to anyone. So sad.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Tue Feb 04, 2014 2:36 am

TCB-FAN wrote:According to paramedics on the scene, a hypodermic needle was found still stuck on his arm. They also found envelopes filled with heroin in his suite. Drug addiction is such a terrible thing to endure. It can happen to anyone. So sad.


Thanks.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Tue Feb 04, 2014 9:54 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:This is a well-written look at the man, his wonderful talent and diverse acting career, published today.


Hoffman's mastery impossible to ignore
By Mick LaSalle | San Francisco Chronicle
Monday, February 3, 2014

120914_The Master_PS Hoffman.JPG
Philip Seymour Hoffman was nominated for a best supporting actor Oscar as an L. Ron Hubbard-like figure in "The Master."
Photo: Phil Bray, The Weinstein Company


They say the graveyards are full of indispensable men, and yet it's hard not to see the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman as a genuine disaster for motion pictures and for the art of screen acting. To look back on what this consummate American actor accomplished just in the past 15 years is to imagine what he might have done over the next 25 or 30 - except we can't even have the satisfaction of imagining: Hoffman, who was found dead in his New York apartment Sunday, was always surprising us.

An unprepossessing boy-man caught between types, he started out not looking like anybody or like anything in particular. He turned that into an advantage, by showing he could play everything. His features were raw, his body almost uncouth, and yet he was capable of remarkable delicacy. A real artist, his center was impossible to locate because it was always different, and changing. He could be light or heavy, warm or cold.

What remained consistent was his power of thought, which he brought to bear on all his great work, including, notably, the title role in "Capote," one of the most astonishing and sublime chameleon performances in American cinema.

There are rare actors such as this - people whom audiences want to look at, people audiences can't help wanting to look at, even if they don't quite know why. In the case of Hoffman, his opacity was an odd gift - a quality present even in his throwaway performance, such as in "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire." With Hoffman, we never really knew what he was thinking - but we always understood that he was thinking, and that it was something interesting and mesmerizing and slightly out of reach.

He could portray enormous tenderness, and yet he most often played people who were either alienated or had re-created themselves out of profound sense of alienation. Indeed, if you're looking for a common thread in the work of this versatile and multifaceted actor, that might be it. From the shy teacher in "25th Hour" to the self-styled religious leader in "The Master" to the second violinist in "A Late Quartet," he played lonely men who had made some uneasy accommodation with the surrounding world.

He understood flaws. He most certainly understood darkness, particularly the kind of darkness that could restructure itself as creativity. Think of him as the political fixer in "The Ides of March" or as the volatile government agent in "Charlie Wilson's War." One must assume this darkness was also within Hoffman himself and this disturbance was part of his gift. For sure, he often exuded a lack of ease in his own skin, a submerged self-hatred. Was this real? One sensed it was, though perhaps it was just the movies. In any case, the quality of his intelligence was major, and unmistakable.

But all this summing up is too easy - and inadequate. We can go all day saying true and even clever things about Philip Seymour Hoffman, but none of what we say will capture one minute of what he brought to the screen. There are no reasons for an artist of this magnitude, only imperfect and incomplete observations surrounding him, interesting points we might say to each other. But in the end, only Hoffman can speak for Hoffman, and he will continue to speak, in the indelible moments he brought to his best movies.

These are too many to name, but just a few, in random order: his embarrassed interaction with the teenage Anna Paquin in the bar scene in "25th Hour"; the interrogation interview with Joaquin Phoenix in "The Master"; the scene in "A Late Quartet," in which he becomes absolutely terrified when his wife catches him with another woman; his funny telephone scenes as Lester Bangs in "Almost Famous"; his tantrum in "Charlie Wilson's War"; his wounded betrayal in "The Ides of March"; and his mysterious, impenetrable sense of injury in "Doubt."

There are more - many more. I'm loath to stop listing them, because I'm loath to say goodbye. Forty-six years is barely more than half a life, less than half of a career. Yet Philip Seymour Hoffman leaves behind riches.


http://www.sfchronicle.com/movies/article/Philip-Seymour-Hoffman-s-mastery-impossible-to-5198721.php



That's a beautiful tribute. Thanks for posting it.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Wed Feb 05, 2014 7:39 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:This is a well-written look at the man, his wonderful talent and diverse acting career, published today.


Hoffman's mastery impossible to ignore
By Mick LaSalle | San Francisco Chronicle
Monday, February 3, 2014

120914_The Master_PS Hoffman.JPG
Philip Seymour Hoffman was nominated for a best supporting actor Oscar as an L. Ron Hubbard-like figure in "The Master."
Photo: Phil Bray, The Weinstein Company


They say the graveyards are full of indispensable men, and yet it's hard not to see the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman as a genuine disaster for motion pictures and for the art of screen acting. To look back on what this consummate American actor accomplished just in the past 15 years is to imagine what he might have done over the next 25 or 30 - except we can't even have the satisfaction of imagining: Hoffman, who was found dead in his New York apartment Sunday, was always surprising us.

An unprepossessing boy-man caught between types, he started out not looking like anybody or like anything in particular. He turned that into an advantage, by showing he could play everything. His features were raw, his body almost uncouth, and yet he was capable of remarkable delicacy. A real artist, his center was impossible to locate because it was always different, and changing. He could be light or heavy, warm or cold.

What remained consistent was his power of thought, which he brought to bear on all his great work, including, notably, the title role in "Capote," one of the most astonishing and sublime chameleon performances in American cinema.

There are rare actors such as this - people whom audiences want to look at, people audiences can't help wanting to look at, even if they don't quite know why. In the case of Hoffman, his opacity was an odd gift - a quality present even in his throwaway performance, such as in "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire." With Hoffman, we never really knew what he was thinking - but we always understood that he was thinking, and that it was something interesting and mesmerizing and slightly out of reach.

He could portray enormous tenderness, and yet he most often played people who were either alienated or had re-created themselves out of profound sense of alienation. Indeed, if you're looking for a common thread in the work of this versatile and multifaceted actor, that might be it. From the shy teacher in "25th Hour" to the self-styled religious leader in "The Master" to the second violinist in "A Late Quartet," he played lonely men who had made some uneasy accommodation with the surrounding world.

He understood flaws. He most certainly understood darkness, particularly the kind of darkness that could restructure itself as creativity. Think of him as the political fixer in "The Ides of March" or as the volatile government agent in "Charlie Wilson's War." One must assume this darkness was also within Hoffman himself and this disturbance was part of his gift. For sure, he often exuded a lack of ease in his own skin, a submerged self-hatred. Was this real? One sensed it was, though perhaps it was just the movies. In any case, the quality of his intelligence was major, and unmistakable.

But all this summing up is too easy - and inadequate. We can go all day saying true and even clever things about Philip Seymour Hoffman, but none of what we say will capture one minute of what he brought to the screen. There are no reasons for an artist of this magnitude, only imperfect and incomplete observations surrounding him, interesting points we might say to each other. But in the end, only Hoffman can speak for Hoffman, and he will continue to speak, in the indelible moments he brought to his best movies.

These are too many to name, but just a few, in random order: his embarrassed interaction with the teenage Anna Paquin in the bar scene in "25th Hour"; the interrogation interview with Joaquin Phoenix in "The Master"; the scene in "A Late Quartet," in which he becomes absolutely terrified when his wife catches him with another woman; his funny telephone scenes as Lester Bangs in "Almost Famous"; his tantrum in "Charlie Wilson's War"; his wounded betrayal in "The Ides of March"; and his mysterious, impenetrable sense of injury in "Doubt."

There are more - many more. I'm loath to stop listing them, because I'm loath to say goodbye. Forty-six years is barely more than half a life, less than half of a career. Yet Philip Seymour Hoffman leaves behind riches.


http://www.sfchronicle.com/movies/article/Philip-Seymour-Hoffman-s-mastery-impossible-to-5198721.php



Thanks for posting this lovely remembrance by Mick LaSalle. I read this in the San Francisco Chronicle on Monday morning and I found it to be very moving. (I think I'm one of the last people to still get a morning paper.)

Philip Seymour Hoffman was one of my all-time favorite actors. The first time I saw him was in "Boogie Nights" and his performance blew me away. I think my favorite Hoffman performance was in the movie "Doubt." He was remarkable.

It really saddens me that he left his partner and three children. I can't personally relate to drug problems but he must have been in a lot of pain.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Wed Feb 05, 2014 5:31 pm

What a shame. The man was a terrific actor. Making his death even more tragic is that he leaves behind 3 children. RIP.

Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Wed Feb 05, 2014 10:40 pm

This picture leaves me with such an empty feeling in my gut... what a beautiful family. Thanks for posting the picture and the article, John. Along with Heath Ledger, what a waste of two wonderful talents... :(
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Re: Philip Seymour Hoffman dead at 46

Thu Feb 06, 2014 1:13 pm

He had been an addict since he was a kid: he tried to quit at just 22. But he kept getting pulled back in.

The guy seemingly had it all: a fabulous career, unlimited talent, a great family . . .

But he couldn't free himself.

This was his only peace, I guess.

rjm

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