Off Topic Messages

Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 3:54 am

Thankfully the thread has been taken down that could possibly hold the title of "worst taste thread in FECC history" - ie, the one which linked to a video of what appeared to be a mentally ill man getting killed on a pylon. More disturbing than the video was the response from some that thought it was funny or that the "man had it coming to him".

I'm someone who generally disapproves of reposting comments, and it's certainly something I try to avoid. But this is a serious matter, I think, and so for once I'm going to repost my own words from April 2012:

Channel 4 in the UK has a programme which has run for some years called "Embarassing Bodies". This is a series which highlights people's embarassing conditions, such as people with boils on their backsides, men with a penis that is shaped like a TCB symbol and women with breasts that, for some reason, look like Sooty and Sweep respectively. What's more, these embarassing issues are causing them so much distress that they can't tell anyone and, instead, go on TV to show a couple of million viewers instead. I'll confess that I have never ever seen an episode, but I'm sure that there is one embarassing condition which they have never highlighted.

The chat room is a place where many of us partially-nocturnal people spend many an hour talking, bantering and often flirting with people we are most likely never going to meet. That's not always true, I have met a couple of lifelong friends from chat rooms, but that's the exception rather than the rule. For the uninitiated, It's like a forum, but you chat in real time. I go on most nights, mostly speaking to the same people I have done for three or four years - the 21st century equivalent of a penpal.

Last night, I saw someone on there who I haven't seen around for a few months. The conversation went something like this:

"Hey, how are you doing? Not seen you around for ages."
"I'm OK. Just got out of hospital."
"Nothing too serious, I hope?"
"I tried to commit suicide."

As the conversation continued, I learned that this young man whom I have been speaking to for some years now has suffered from depression for a long time but never sought help or told anyone. It was an unnervingly similar conversation to one I had just before Christmas with another friend I met on a chat room. I [i]did
already know about his condition, but he was suffering from a relapse which was causing all kinds of issues and problems. This guy said something to me which really struck a chord, he said "it's easier to come out as gay now, than to come out as a sufferer of depression". I think that's probably true. There is still a huge stigma and misunderstanding regarding mental illnesses, which seems ludicrous in 2012.

By depression, I'm not talking about someone who is sad for a week or two because their dog died, they lost their job or even that a relative died, I'm talking about clinical depression which is a long term condition which, more often than not, recurs throughout life. While there appears to often be emotional triggers, the condition is thought to be caused by simply a chemical inbalance in the brain. So, while we view it as a mental illness, the cause is really as physical as someone with too much blood sugar - but we don't have the same stigma about diabetes. Like diabetes or a heart condition, clinical depression is something its sufferers are never likely to fully be rid of and, instead, have to work their lives around. And the symptoms are not simply a low mood, we are talking here of times when energy levels are so low it is impossible to make it from the bed to bedroom door. As a society, we can cope with people whose illnesses affect their bodies, but not those that affect their brains.

I was diagnosed with depression about 18 years ago, when I was about 20, although I can trace it back long before then. It's caused me to have long stints off work in 1995. 1998 and 2000 although, on the whole, it has been managed more effectively since then by new medications that have come along. That doesn't mean there aren't still relapses (I'm currently in the middle of one that started in December of last year), but it does mean that over time you get to realise the tell-tale signs of a relapse earlier, and you can adjust lifestyles and medication accordingly before the sh*t hits the fan, so to speak. Most people don't tell others about their illness because of the stigma attatched to it. Instead, we pretend that all is fine, put on a brave face and put on a performance of "normal me" when we go to work each day - and 8 hours of acting a day can be exhaustive in itself.

We forget that depression can, ultimately, have fatal consequences. I'm not talking here of suicide necessarily, although this is not an uncommon occurance, but depression can have other physical side effects such as people not looking after themselves, weight gain, weight loss etc. Recent studies suggest that around 10% of deaths of those who have been diagnosed with depression and/or manic depression (bipolar) are related in some way to the illness. That's a higher mortality rate than some cancers.

Depression/mental illness is one of the few things we are not generally accepting of in today's society. But we are in a vicious circle - people won't admit their condition until society accepts it, and society won't accept it until enough people declare their illness and so it is no longer seen to be odd or weird or weak - the link my friend made with the rising acceptance of homosexuality over the last thirty years or so is extremely valid. Until enough people "come out" to show it is "normal", it will remain not normal.

Let's hope that the next few years sees people's views change on such issues, so that more can stop suffering in silence.[/i]


The young man I spoke about at the beginning of that post had further problems earlier this year and was in quite a bad way last time I spoke to him, about May. He had been online most nights for about six months. I haven't seen or heard from him since, and admit that I fear the worst - especially as his twitter and facebook accounts have both gone too.

Mental illness is not a laughing matter. It nearly ended my own life in 1998 - and I would like to think that a youtube video of me swallowing a bottle of pills at that time would not be the cause of jokes or "he had it coming to him" comments on here. That is the equivalent of what people were laughing at in the deleted thread. A life was being threatened - whether that was by a bottle of pills or jumping off a pylon is unimportant.

BBC3 in the UK ran a ground-breaking season of programmes during the summer on mental health issues amongst the young. Many of them were excellent examples of why we shouldn't grudge our TV licence. And yet anyone spending time following the comments about them on twitter will know that they were split roughly 50/50 between sympathy/empathy/support and mockery of the mentally ill.

In America, President Obama has kickstarted an initiative for media companies to work with mental health workers to more realistically portray people with mental health conditions and to educate people through film and TV on these issues. I have much time for the Canadian police drama Rookie Blue, and yet their horrendous portrayal of bipolar in this summer's season showed just how far we have to go before realism takes over from exaggeration and myth.

I have slowly been doing some work on portrayals of mental health issues in film and TV, and the following (rather lengthy) post pretty much sums up where I am at the moment (following a paper given at a conference in June 2013)

http://silentmovieblog.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/mental-illness-comes-out-of-the-celluloid-closet/

It is essential that we take these issues seriously. Please let's not have a repeat of that deleted thread.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 5:27 am

Like I mentioned in the other thread...Does anyone know that if the man in video was mentally ill? Making fun of a person that is mentally challenged is in bad taste...but so is jumping to conclusions.

Mountain climbers, stunt men, Nascar drivers...are they mentally ill? Or anyone that likes to live on the edge?

There are some people that are truly "mentally" ill and there are those that are just stupid...there is a difference.

If in fact the man in the video was not right in the head, then I feel for him and his family. But if he was just up there trying to be cute, I still feel for his loved ones, but not so much for him.

Be keen to those folks that jump too quickly on calling someone a bigot, a mean spirited person or a perason of "bad" taste...for they are usually the ones covering up their own personal issues.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 2:10 pm

Fairchild1171 wrote:Like I mentioned in the other thread...Does anyone know that if the man in video was mentally ill? Making fun of a person that is mentally challenged is in bad taste...but so is jumping to conclusions.

Mountain climbers, stunt men, Nascar drivers...are they mentally ill? Or anyone that likes to live on the edge?

There are some people that are truly "mentally" ill and there are those that are just stupid...there is a difference.

If in fact the man in the video was not right in the head, then I feel for him and his family. But if he was just up there trying to be cute, I still feel for his loved ones, but not so much for him.

Be keen to those folks that jump too quickly on calling someone a bigot, a mean spirited person or a perason of "bad" taste...for they are usually the ones covering up their own personal issues.


Whether he was mentally ill or not is hardly the point - the point is that some assumed he was and were making light of both that and the fact he may well have died or at least been seriously injured.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 4:36 pm

poormadpeter wrote:Thankfully the thread has been taken down that could possibly hold the title of "worst taste thread in FECC history" - ie, the one which linked to a video of what appeared to be a mentally ill man getting killed on a pylon. More disturbing than the video was the response from some that thought it was funny or that the "man had it coming to him".

I'm someone who generally disapproves of reposting comments, and it's certainly something I try to avoid. But this is a serious matter, I think, and so for once I'm going to repost my own words from April 2012:

Channel 4 in the UK has a programme which has run for some years called "Embarassing Bodies". This is a series which highlights people's embarassing conditions, such as people with boils on their backsides, men with a penis that is shaped like a TCB symbol and women with breasts that, for some reason, look like Sooty and Sweep respectively. What's more, these embarassing issues are causing them so much distress that they can't tell anyone and, instead, go on TV to show a couple of million viewers instead. I'll confess that I have never ever seen an episode, but I'm sure that there is one embarassing condition which they have never highlighted.

The chat room is a place where many of us partially-nocturnal people spend many an hour talking, bantering and often flirting with people we are most likely never going to meet. That's not always true, I have met a couple of lifelong friends from chat rooms, but that's the exception rather than the rule. For the uninitiated, It's like a forum, but you chat in real time. I go on most nights, mostly speaking to the same people I have done for three or four years - the 21st century equivalent of a penpal.

Last night, I saw someone on there who I haven't seen around for a few months. The conversation went something like this:

"Hey, how are you doing? Not seen you around for ages."
"I'm OK. Just got out of hospital."
"Nothing too serious, I hope?"
"I tried to commit suicide."

As the conversation continued, I learned that this young man whom I have been speaking to for some years now has suffered from depression for a long time but never sought help or told anyone. It was an unnervingly similar conversation to one I had just before Christmas with another friend I met on a chat room. I [i]did
already know about his condition, but he was suffering from a relapse which was causing all kinds of issues and problems. This guy said something to me which really struck a chord, he said "it's easier to come out as gay now, than to come out as a sufferer of depression". I think that's probably true. There is still a huge stigma and misunderstanding regarding mental illnesses, which seems ludicrous in 2012.

By depression, I'm not talking about someone who is sad for a week or two because their dog died, they lost their job or even that a relative died, I'm talking about clinical depression which is a long term condition which, more often than not, recurs throughout life. While there appears to often be emotional triggers, the condition is thought to be caused by simply a chemical inbalance in the brain. So, while we view it as a mental illness, the cause is really as physical as someone with too much blood sugar - but we don't have the same stigma about diabetes. Like diabetes or a heart condition, clinical depression is something its sufferers are never likely to fully be rid of and, instead, have to work their lives around. And the symptoms are not simply a low mood, we are talking here of times when energy levels are so low it is impossible to make it from the bed to bedroom door. As a society, we can cope with people whose illnesses affect their bodies, but not those that affect their brains.

I was diagnosed with depression about 18 years ago, when I was about 20, although I can trace it back long before then. It's caused me to have long stints off work in 1995. 1998 and 2000 although, on the whole, it has been managed more effectively since then by new medications that have come along. That doesn't mean there aren't still relapses (I'm currently in the middle of one that started in December of last year), but it does mean that over time you get to realise the tell-tale signs of a relapse earlier, and you can adjust lifestyles and medication accordingly before the sh*t hits the fan, so to speak. Most people don't tell others about their illness because of the stigma attatched to it. Instead, we pretend that all is fine, put on a brave face and put on a performance of "normal me" when we go to work each day - and 8 hours of acting a day can be exhaustive in itself.

We forget that depression can, ultimately, have fatal consequences. I'm not talking here of suicide necessarily, although this is not an uncommon occurance, but depression can have other physical side effects such as people not looking after themselves, weight gain, weight loss etc. Recent studies suggest that around 10% of deaths of those who have been diagnosed with depression and/or manic depression (bipolar) are related in some way to the illness. That's a higher mortality rate than some cancers.

Depression/mental illness is one of the few things we are not generally accepting of in today's society. But we are in a vicious circle - people won't admit their condition until society accepts it, and society won't accept it until enough people declare their illness and so it is no longer seen to be odd or weird or weak - the link my friend made with the rising acceptance of homosexuality over the last thirty years or so is extremely valid. Until enough people "come out" to show it is "normal", it will remain not normal.

Let's hope that the next few years sees people's views change on such issues, so that more can stop suffering in silence.[/i]


The young man I spoke about at the beginning of that post had further problems earlier this year and was in quite a bad way last time I spoke to him, about May. He had been online most nights for about six months. I haven't seen or heard from him since, and admit that I fear the worst - especially as his twitter and facebook accounts have both gone too.

Mental illness is not a laughing matter. It nearly ended my own life in 1998 - and I would like to think that a youtube video of me swallowing a bottle of pills at that time would not be the cause of jokes or "he had it coming to him" comments on here. That is the equivalent of what people were laughing at in the deleted thread. A life was being threatened - whether that was by a bottle of pills or jumping off a pylon is unimportant.

BBC3 in the UK ran a ground-breaking season of programmes during the summer on mental health issues amongst the young. Many of them were excellent examples of why we shouldn't grudge our TV licence. And yet anyone spending time following the comments about them on twitter will know that they were split roughly 50/50 between sympathy/empathy/support and mockery of the mentally ill.

In America, President Obama has kickstarted an initiative for media companies to work with mental health workers to more realistically portray people with mental health conditions and to educate people through film and TV on these issues. I have much time for the Canadian police drama Rookie Blue, and yet their horrendous portrayal of bipolar in this summer's season showed just how far we have to go before realism takes over from exaggeration and myth.

I have slowly been doing some work on portrayals of mental health issues in film and TV, and the following (rather lengthy) post pretty much sums up where I am at the moment (following a paper given at a conference in June 2013)

http://silentmovieblog.wordpress.com/2013/02/22/mental-illness-comes-out-of-the-celluloid-closet/

It is essential that we take these issues seriously. Please let's not have a repeat of that deleted thread.


Thanks for the post, poormadpeter.

Regarding the treatment of mental illness on the media, I think a good example is the series "Monk". It's one of my favorites series ever. The main character, detective Adrian Monk (as played genially by Tony Shalhoub, who won three Emmys for that), suffers from OCD. And it's great how positively the writers present the character. And this, of course, is an achievement. People liking this series will inevitably have a more positive outllook on the matter if they ever meet an OCD suffering person.

Thanks again !

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 6:16 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
Fairchild1171 wrote:Like I mentioned in the other thread...Does anyone know that if the man in video was mentally ill? Making fun of a person that is mentally challenged is in bad taste...but so is jumping to conclusions.

Mountain climbers, stunt men, Nascar drivers...are they mentally ill? Or anyone that likes to live on the edge?

There are some people that are truly "mentally" ill and there are those that are just stupid...there is a difference.

If in fact the man in the video was not right in the head, then I feel for him and his family. But if he was just up there trying to be cute, I still feel for his loved ones, but not so much for him.

Be keen to those folks that jump too quickly on calling someone a bigot, a mean spirited person or a perason of "bad" taste...for they are usually the ones covering up their own personal issues.


Whether he was mentally ill or not is hardly the point - the point is that some assumed he was and were making light of both that and the fact he may well have died or at least been seriously injured.



Yes, that is THE point. One could argue that he was not mentally ill, just as you can argue that he was. You know the old saying...when you assume something you make an "ass-out of u and me." And I know all about OCD, I have battled that for nearly 10 years. Once you think you have it under control, it creeps up on you and you start doing crazy things like counting a certain number of times before you start your car.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 7:00 pm

Fairchild1171 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Fairchild1171 wrote:Like I mentioned in the other thread...Does anyone know that if the man in video was mentally ill? Making fun of a person that is mentally challenged is in bad taste...but so is jumping to conclusions.

Mountain climbers, stunt men, Nascar drivers...are they mentally ill? Or anyone that likes to live on the edge?

There are some people that are truly "mentally" ill and there are those that are just stupid...there is a difference.

If in fact the man in the video was not right in the head, then I feel for him and his family. But if he was just up there trying to be cute, I still feel for his loved ones, but not so much for him.

Be keen to those folks that jump too quickly on calling someone a bigot, a mean spirited person or a perason of "bad" taste...for they are usually the ones covering up their own personal issues.


Whether he was mentally ill or not is hardly the point - the point is that some assumed he was and were making light of both that and the fact he may well have died or at least been seriously injured.



Yes, that is THE point. One could argue that he was not mentally ill, just as you can argue that he was. You know the old saying...when you assume something you make an "ass-out of u and me." And I know all about OCD, I have battled that for nearly 10 years. Once you think you have it under control, it creeps up on you and you start doing crazy things like counting a certain number of times before you start your car.


The bottom line is that it never should have been posted here on FECC. No matter what the circumstances were a human being died and it's not funny. I find it highly disturbing that there are some members who find enjoyment watching another person's death. (And yes, the person died. It happened in Santiago, Chile. I did about 1-2 minutes of research to find that the man was under the influence of drugs.)

The fact that it was posted as a joke is so disturbing it's unfathomable. And the person who posted the topic called those who were disturbed by it as "crybabies" and "bleeding hearts." That is mind boggling.

Oh, and by the way, the person who died in the video was mentally disturbed.

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/r ... al-illness

Is drug addiction a mental illness?

Yes, because addiction changes the brain in fundamental ways, disturbing a person's normal hierarchy of needs and desires and substituting new priorities connected with procuring and using the drug. The resulting compulsive behaviors that override the ability to control impulses despite the consequences are similar to hallmarks of other mental illnesses.


Any Elvis fan should fully understand the effects of drugs on a person's mind.



Thanks for your post, PMP.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 7:03 pm

Fairchild1171 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Fairchild1171 wrote:Like I mentioned in the other thread...Does anyone know that if the man in video was mentally ill? Making fun of a person that is mentally challenged is in bad taste...but so is jumping to conclusions.

Mountain climbers, stunt men, Nascar drivers...are they mentally ill? Or anyone that likes to live on the edge?

There are some people that are truly "mentally" ill and there are those that are just stupid...there is a difference.

If in fact the man in the video was not right in the head, then I feel for him and his family. But if he was just up there trying to be cute, I still feel for his loved ones, but not so much for him.

Be keen to those folks that jump too quickly on calling someone a bigot, a mean spirited person or a perason of "bad" taste...for they are usually the ones covering up their own personal issues.


Whether he was mentally ill or not is hardly the point - the point is that some assumed he was and were making light of both that and the fact he may well have died or at least been seriously injured.



Yes, that is THE point. One could argue that he was not mentally ill, just as you can argue that he was. You know the old saying...when you assume something you make an "ass-out of u and me." And I know all about OCD, I have battled that for nearly 10 years. Once you think you have it under control, it creeps up on you and you start doing crazy things like counting a certain number of times before you start your car.


No. I disagree. People thought he was mentally disturbed (which in not the part I have a problem with), but then thought it was OK to mock that.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 7:54 pm

I agree..it is NOT Ok to mock someone who is mentally disturbed.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:11 pm

InheritTheWind wrote:The bottom line is that it never should have been posted here on FECC. No matter what the circumstances were a human being died and it's not funny. I find it highly disturbing that there are some members who find enjoyment watching another person's death. (And yes, the person died. It happened in Santiago, Chile. I did about 1-2 minutes of research to find that the man was under the influence of drugs.)

The fact that it was posted as a joke is so disturbing it's unfathomable. And the person who posted the topic called those who were disturbed by it as "crybabies" and "bleeding hearts." That is mind boggling.

Oh, and by the way, the person who died in the video was mentally disturbed.

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/r ... al-illness

Is drug addiction a mental illness?

Yes, because addiction changes the brain in fundamental ways, disturbing a person's normal hierarchy of needs and desires and substituting new priorities connected with procuring and using the drug. The resulting compulsive behaviors that override the ability to control impulses despite the consequences are similar to hallmarks of other mental illnesses.


Any Elvis fan should fully understand the effects of drugs on a person's mind.



Thank you. That now-deleted topic revealed a lot about the mindset of certain members of this forum. Very sad.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 10:06 pm

No need to apologize Doc. Most forum members know who to over look. :)

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 10:26 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
InheritTheWind wrote:The bottom line is that it never should have been posted here on FECC. No matter what the circumstances were a human being died and it's not funny. I find it highly disturbing that there are some members who find enjoyment watching another person's death. (And yes, the person died. It happened in Santiago, Chile. I did about 1-2 minutes of research to find that the man was under the influence of drugs.)

The fact that it was posted as a joke is so disturbing it's unfathomable. And the person who posted the topic called those who were disturbed by it as "crybabies" and "bleeding hearts." That is mind boggling.

Oh, and by the way, the person who died in the video was mentally disturbed.

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/r ... al-illness

Is drug addiction a mental illness?

Yes, because addiction changes the brain in fundamental ways, disturbing a person's normal hierarchy of needs and desires and substituting new priorities connected with procuring and using the drug. The resulting compulsive behaviors that override the ability to control impulses despite the consequences are similar to hallmarks of other mental illnesses.


Any Elvis fan should fully understand the effects of drugs on a person's mind.



Thank you. That now-deleted topic revealed a lot about the mindset of certain members of this forum. Very sad.


It's extremely sad. As you said in another thread one of the most troubling things about certain forum members is the complete lack of "grace, civility or humanity." The lack of humanity is especially disturbing. And worrisome.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 10:32 pm

InheritTheWind wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:Thank you. That now-deleted topic revealed a lot about the mindset of certain members of this forum. Very sad.


It's extremely sad. As you said in another thread one of the most troubling things about certain forum members is the complete lack of "grace, civility or humanity." The lack of humanity is especially disturbing. And worrisome.


One of many qualities that drew me closer to Elvis Presley was his grace, civility and humanity. Some fans here never got that memo.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:09 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
InheritTheWind wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:Thank you. That now-deleted topic revealed a lot about the mindset of certain members of this forum. Very sad.


It's extremely sad. As you said in another thread one of the most troubling things about certain forum members is the complete lack of "grace, civility or humanity." The lack of humanity is especially disturbing. And worrisome.


One of many qualities that drew me closer to Elvis Presley was his grace, civility and humanity. Some fans here never got that memo.


When were you first drawn to it?
I can relate to your remark but it would be hard for me to put a stamp on it. It is just something i see, recognize in him (most of the time).

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:24 pm

epf wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:One of many qualities that drew me closer to Elvis Presley was his grace, civility and humanity. Some fans here never got that memo.


When were you first drawn to it?
I can relate to your remark but it would be hard for me to put a stamp on it. It is just something i see, recognize in him (most of the time).


When I learned how he would treat people in general. How he cared for his family. How kind he was to animals. His sense of charity. And, of course, his greatest vocals convey this humanity.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:28 pm

It's good to see this post as a reaction to some of the moronic, classless, tasteless utterances posted on here yesterday.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:29 pm

londonflash wrote:It's good to see this post as a reaction to some of the moronic, classless, tasteless utterances posted on here yesterday.


Thanks!

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:48 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
epf wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:One of many qualities that drew me closer to Elvis Presley was his grace, civility and humanity. Some fans here never got that memo.


When were you first drawn to it?
I can relate to your remark but it would be hard for me to put a stamp on it. It is just something i see, recognize in him (most of the time).


When I learned how he would treat people in general. How he cared for his family. How kind he was to animals. His sense of charity. And, of course, his greatest vocals convey this humanity.


True. And it stayed with him all his life, even when he was fighting his own demons. A complicated picture, but in the end the good outweighs the bad imho.

Re: Mental Health: It's not funny

Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:48 pm

As with so many things, this issue isn't just one of taste and politeness, but one of ignorance. But it's a vicious circle - people are ignorant because those of us with mental health issues don't talk about it, but we don't talk about it because of people's ignorance. At one point, that circle has to be broken in order for things to change.

People have some kind of issue with it because it can't be seen or (to be honest) fully understood. And there is still the stigma that the depressed aren't really ill but just lazy or weird.

The truth of the matter is that clinical depression alone (not counting any other of the mental health medical conditions such as schizophrenia, aspergers etc) has around a 5% mortality rate. To add to this, there is now solid evidence that those with depression are more likely to develop diabetes and heart disease in later life. If this was a cancer, there'd be endless adverts on the tv telling us to look out for warning symptoms.