Off Topic Messages

Re: Rare Sinatra material (updated 1 June 2013)

Sun Jun 02, 2013 4:45 am

There has been a wealth of RCA/Columbia material made available since The Song is You and The Columbia Years box sets were released in 1994 and 1993, respectively -- both of which remain tremendous sets. There's still unreleased Sinatra material from the forties, but Columbia have consistently produced such great releases from this period that it's inevitable that we'll see more. With Dorsey, however, releases such as Young Blue Eyes: Birth of the Crooner, Learn to Croon and It's All So New offered a treasure trove of dazzling radio performances. In splendid sound, I might add. Columbia Legacy have gone further, with Christmas Songs by Sinatra, Sinatra: Love Songs, Sinatra Sings Rodgers and Hammerstein, Sinatra Sings Gershwin, The Essential Frank Sinatra, Portrait of Sinatra, Sinatra Sings Cole Porter, Swing and Dance With Frank Sinatra, The Voice of Frank Sinatra and the stellar box set, A Voice in Time, offering in the region of 90 unreleased and alternate takes, air checks and live performances.

Sinatra's Porgy and Bess medley in Buffalo, from 1982, is wonderful stuff. Frank relished in the music of George and Ira Gershwin, with his 1940s recordings and live performances of their songs proving outstanding in almost every example. His 1945 recording of Someone to Watch Over Me is beyond exquisite, as is his mesmerising 1946 recording of Oh Bess, Where is My Bess? His range was exceptional and it really showed with such marvellous material. Material he continued to sing during the subsequent five decades in which he would record and perform live.

Re: Rare Sinatra material (updated 1 June 2013)

Sun Jun 02, 2013 5:30 am

greystoke wrote:There has been a wealth of RCA/Columbia material made available since The Song is You and The Columbia Years box sets were released in 1994 and 1993, respectively -- both of which remain tremendous sets. There's still unreleased Sinatra material from the forties, but Columbia have consistently produced such great releases from this period that it's inevitable that we'll see more. With Dorsey, however, releases such as Young Blue Eyes: Birth of the Crooner, Learn to Croon and It's All So New offered a treasure trove of dazzling radio performances. In splendid sound, I might add. Columbia Legacy have gone further, with Christmas Songs by Sinatra, Sinatra: Love Songs, Sinatra Sings Rodgers and Hammerstein, Sinatra Sings Gershwin, The Essential Frank Sinatra, Portrait of Sinatra, Sinatra Sings Cole Porter, Swing and Dance With Frank Sinatra, The Voice of Frank Sinatra and the stellar box set, A Voice in Time, offering in the region of 90 unreleased and alternate takes, air checks and live performances.

Sinatra's Porgy and Bess medley in Buffalo, from 1982, is wonderful stuff. Frank relished in the music of George and Ira Gershwin, with his 1940s recordings and live performances of their songs proving outstanding in almost every example. His 1945 recording of Someone to Watch Over Me is beyond exquisite, as is his mesmerising 1946 recording of Oh Bess, Where is My Bess? His range was exceptional and it really showed with such marvellous material. Material he continued to sing during the subsequent five decades in which he would record and perform live.


I knew you were the person for the early stuff!

Talking of which, wasn't there a P&B medley on the radio in the 40s that he performed? Is it the same form as the Buffalo medley?

(I have been contacted by someone who says they have a second performance of the medley from the 80s, this time from a soundboard - I'll post it if I ever get my hands on it!)

Re: Rare Sinatra material (updated 1 June 2013)

Sun Jun 02, 2013 7:04 am

Sinatra turned to Porgy and Bess medlies a few times during the forties -- on the Vimms Vitamins Show, recorded on Sept. 19th, 1944, he performed a medley of Summertime/I Got Plenty O' Nuttin'/Summertime. And, as part of a George Gershwin tribute show, recorded on June 4th, 1947, with Jane Powell and the Pied Pipers, they performed Summertime/There's a Boat That's Leaving Soon for New York/Street Cries/Bess You is My Woman Now. Again, exemplary stuff!

Re: Rare Sinatra material

Tue Jun 04, 2013 1:51 am

poormadpeter wrote:The fact that The Girls I Never Kissed was remixed might mean that a mopping-up exercise might still be forthcoming at some stage, and I sincerely hope that is the case.


I wouldn't read too much into that. Several years ago, Leiber & Stoller requested permission to do the remix, which permission was granted by the Sinatra family. So, it's not directly indicative of any initiative from the Sinatra camp. OTOH, the Sinatra camp was wholly supportive of the effort, and, while the remix has not been formally issued, it has been aired numerous times on Siriusly Sinatra.

So, the positive takeaway is that they're open to reapproaching the catalog. However, I would expect them to remain conservative in their overall approach, as befits the nature of this particular legacy. (Which is to say, I wouldn't expect a Sinatra-themed Cirque du Soleil show à la Viva Elvis anytime soon.)

Re: Rare Sinatra material

Tue Jun 04, 2013 1:59 am

PStoller wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:The fact that The Girls I Never Kissed was remixed might mean that a mopping-up exercise might still be forthcoming at some stage, and I sincerely hope that is the case.


I wouldn't read too much into that. Several years ago, Leiber & Stoller requested permission to do the remix, which permission was granted by the Sinatra family. So, it's not directly indicative of any initiative from the Sinatra camp. OTOH, the Sinatra camp was wholly supportive of the effort, and, while the remix has not been formally issued, it has been aired numerous times on Siriusly Sinatra.

So, the positive takeaway is that they're open to reapproaching the catalog. However, I would expect them to remain conservative in their overall approach, as befits the nature of this particular legacy. (Which is to say, I wouldn't expect a Sinatra-themed Cirque du Soleil show à la Viva Elvis anytime soon.)


For which we should be thankful.

The Sinatra estate have, for the most part, been very careful about what has been released posthumously (the many Columbia recordings that Greystoke talks about aside). There are, we know, many concerts in the vaults, but relatively few have seen the light of day. The Las Vegas box was excellent, but the New York box was decidedly mediocre for the most part and adds little to the established legacy. I confess that I am much happier with the recent re-release of the original albums than I am with, for example, Sony's endless parade of uninspired compilations. But a mopping up exercise for Sinatra's reprise period would be welcome nonetheless.

Re: Rare Sinatra material (updated 1 June 2013)

Tue Jun 11, 2013 1:41 am

They should release a mint quality Welcome home Elvis special since the quality going around is very poor bright faded b&w and hissy sound quality.