Off Topic Messages

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Fri May 03, 2013 1:47 pm

Very sad news. I never chatted to LTB personally, but always enjoyed his posts. He was a wonderful writer that was able to combine an excellent knowledge of all things Elvis with a fan's perspective on the man and his music.

I always liked the way he would write about the less celebrated songs and performances. These were the type of posts that made me dig out those recordings again, and often gave me a fresh perspective on them. I really hope the book he was working on will be published, as it would be a fitting tribute to a unique talent.

My thoughts are with his friends and family. He will be sorely missed on this message-board.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Fri May 03, 2013 2:47 pm

Our thoughts should be with LTB's family today. They are having to bury their loved one. It would have been a nice gesture to have closed the forum today out of respect. I will not be posting the remainder of the day. It's the only way I know to show my respect today for a forum member that will be dearly missed.

I suggest that the forum be closed for the rest of the day.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Fri May 03, 2013 11:47 pm

I'm so very sorry to read this awfully sad news.My deepest condolences go to Harleys family and friends at this very sad time.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Sat May 04, 2013 11:01 am

Rob wrote: I will not be posting the remainder of the day. It's the only way I know to show my respect today for a forum member that will be dearly missed.




Well said rob ! exactly what i did yesterday too !!!

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Sat May 04, 2013 12:25 pm

rocknroller wrote:
Rob wrote: I will not be posting the remainder of the day. It's the only way I know to show my respect today for a forum member that will be dearly missed.




Well said rob ! exactly what i did yesterday too !!!


Just want to say that I respect your choice and Rob's tremendously.

I guess we all have to mourn in our own way.

My thoughts were, of course, with the service today. But I did write. He was a writer, and so I wrote.

I hope that in time, when we have recovered, the concern expressed by some here about his book can be addressed. But it's not time.

Many have not recovered.

rjm


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I317 using Tapatalk 2

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Sat May 04, 2013 4:57 pm

I just saw this, very sad news. He was a passionate Elvis fan and I really did enjoy his intelligent posts, he will be sadly missed on this forum and he will be remembered fondly. My deepest condolences to his family and loved ones during this truly horrible time.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Tue May 07, 2013 7:57 pm

So many beautiful messages and thoughts have been entered into this thread.

Just going to quote a few odds 'n' ends...

rocknroller wrote:Im so sorry to hear this bike is one one of my fav posters on this forum and like everyone else i loved his posts.i hope you get though this mate and comeback bigger and stronger My thoughts and prayers are with you.i have to add that was a lovely post from cryogenic.bike along with greystoke cryo are for me the most talented writers we have here on the fecc !!!


This was lovely of you to say so, rocknroller. I can't profess to having 1/10th the knowledge that LTB/Harley had, but I've tried to turn my hand at a few wordier -- and, hopefully, interesting -- posts in my time.

ElvisLive3August1969 wrote:I thought he was much older than that because he was knowledgeable nearly on every topic.


This is a keen observation. I guess I used to feel that LTB had to be in his 50s -- but when he began here, he would still have been in his early 30s!

PiersEIN wrote:
jacob wrote:LTB's passing was shocking to read, my thoughts go out to his family. His contribution to this board cannot be understated, he was a fantastic writer who wrote with passion and without bias.
And because his words had such a strong impact on us all perhaps there should be a little section somewhere on this board where those words can be stored for reference for future use?

Harley had a few other articles he was working on - though I know very little about how he was going with his book.

I will certainly create a section for him on ElvisInfoNet.
A lot of his key articles are indexed here on the last article he finished for EIN on 'Follow That Dream'.
Look here>>
http://www.elvisinfonet.com/spotlight_f ... dream.html

It's a sad sad day.
- Piers


Piers, you do tremendous work at EIN, and I'm grateful to see you already have a list of LTB's key articles. It was about time LTB spread his wings, even in this mortal frame, and started having his thoughts read by a wider audience. Well, I guess FECC and EIN are places for hardcores, but if just a handful of more people got wind of LTB because of the articles on your site, all's the better!

Swingin-Little-Guitar-Man wrote:I hope his great posts will remain here for all of us to look back on - they'll always be insightful, thought provoking and superbly written pieces of work.

And you know what? Just like our old friend Sam, LTB will make the odd "comeback" when an old topic is revived. This happens from time to time and we see a fun little vignette from Sam and it always makes me smile - a smile tinged with sadness sure - but he's still somewhere out there.


People can achieve a kind of immortality in their writings and their works. LTB was part and parcel of what made FECC a fun place to visit -- because you never knew when a fresh LTB post would come along; you simply knew it would. It may take a while to adjust to this new reality, but LTB was reasonably prolific in his time, so I think you are quite correct.

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:While I didn't share his liberal politics (not all of them), for many of us he was a voice speaking up (as was said here yesterday) for understanding Elvis' place in music history as well as being a bit of a corrective from what might be called the Rolling Stone magazine view of rock and pop music history.

May he rest in peace. I for one hope to keep his instincts and love of music and film alive here and in all my doings.


Greg, I expect nothing less! It's wonderful to hear you say that. I know you and I have butted heads a few times, but you're one of the old guard, and a pretty superb writer yourself. I hope you can continue on FECC and go on wielding that sort of antediluvian flame (for Elvis and pop culture).

elvisalisellers wrote:This place will be much the poorer without the contributions of "likethebike".

It also says a lot for the man that he kept a dignified silence over his illness.


That's true, I think -- and for a guy who sought a certain dignity and respect for Elvis and his rich catalogue, it feels appropriate.

Peter Franks wrote:He was a level-headed, insightful and open-minded individual who did not argue, as so many here have done, but who discussed, presented alternative viewpoints and respectfully tried to convince you of his opinions.


That's a good way to remember him. LTB had his strong opinions like anyone, but he was often quite respectful in how he put his views across. Given the passions he had, he was quite diligent at how he went about expressing himself.

I know likethebike posted some of his best work as a response to others, but perhaps it would be a nice remembrance to create a section on this board with a select number of his best original essays on Elvis. I haven't gone back to read everything he's written, but a quick search reveals just over 180 threads created by him over the years. Perhaps we can select, say, twenty-five and post them in a separate new forum, not just as a repository of great essays, but as a showcase for the great quality of the writing that he contributed to this messageboard.


I think that's a cool idea -- especially as several member sections already exist. Few people have done more to stir great discussion here since FECC began.

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:For audiences at that time, be it his father's affection for John Wayne movies or trying to understand why
"Blue Hawaii" hit such a popular chord, even if dismissed (rightly or wrongly) by modern fans , etc. etc. He liked to speak up
for the under-dog - be it the now-unhip or just causally dismissed fare that he thought once and still does matter.
Although his trade was journalism, he had the heart of a historian - a keen sense of time and place and context.


Neat perspective there, Greg. While it sounds parochial for me to say it, that's another loss to the board -- that acute sensitivity to history that LTB had. He couched many of his remarks with some kind of nod to the inclemencies of the time and place that icons like EP lived in and through.

Here's his obituary, published just hours ago on-line and in to be printed in tomorrow's Easton Express :

************************************************

Harley P. Payette

Harley P. Payette, 43, of Phillipsburg, New Jersey, passed away April 29, 2013 in his home, surrounded by his loving family. Born: He was born July 11, 1969 in Phillipsburg.. He was the son, of the late Harley Rissmiller and Jean Roberts Rissmiller, of Phillipsburg.

Personal: Harley was a Journalist and free lance writer with the Express-Times, Star Ledger, Warren Reporter and the Knowlton News for many years. Harley was a graduate of Phillipsburg High School Class of 1987 and Rider College.

Survivors: Harley is survived by his mother, Jean, of Phillipsburg, NJ; brothers and sisters, Cindy Bennett and her husband Walter, of Phillipsburg, Dawn Rodriguez and her husband William, of Phillipsburg, James Payette, of Centronia, Pennsylvania, Corrnine Payette, of New Port, New Hampshire, Frieda Payette, of Greenville, Tennessee, Clarence Payette, of New Port, NH, Crystal Payette of New Port, NH; nieces and nephews, Robert Silfies, Jerry and Jesse Yanavok and Amber and Miguel Rosairo. Harley was predeceased by a brother, George Payette, who passed away in 1983.

Services: A Funeral Service will be celebrated on Friday May 3, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., in the Finegan Funeral Home, 302 Heckman St., Phillipsburg, NJ 08865.
Calling hours will be from 9 to 11:00 a.m., in the funeral home, on Friday. Interment will follow in Fairmount Cemetery, Phillipsburg, NJ.

Memorials:
In Lieu of flowers, Memorial Contributions may be made in memory of Harley in c/o the funeral home. Fineganfh.com



The guest-book can be found here:
http://obits.lehighvalleylive.com/obitu ... bLoggedOut


Thank you for the obit and the link. I'll be writing in that book in two shakes of a lamb's tail.

I have the following passage earmarked -- from a wikipedia page I was reading just the other day:

That man indeed whom these (contacts)
do not disturb, who is even-minded in
pleasure and pain, steadfast, he is fit
for immortality, O best of men.


TJ wrote:This is very upsetting. I'd known about Harley's illness for a long time and really hoped he would beat it.

Harley was an excellent writer with an infectious enthusiasm for many of the greats of popular music. He made a number of insightful contributions to my site over the last few years, all of which were very welcome:
http://www.classicpopicons.com/tag/harley-payette/

Harley will be greatly missed.

My thoughts are with all who knew him.


Thanks, TJ. I'll be sure to check those out! 8)

Tony Trout wrote:
Cryogenic wrote:
PiersEIN wrote:It is with a truly heavy heart that I have to inform you all that 'Like The Bike' aka Harley Payette passed away this morning.

His nephew told me that the support and messages I forwarded to the family were really appreciated.

There's little more I can say -
.. although I will print out your messages and post them to his Mother who was looking after him, so that she can see how much he meant to all of us that knew him.

.."And what is to cease breathing, but to free the breath from its restless tides, that it may rise and expand and seek God unencumbered? Only when you drink from the river of silence shall you indeed sing. And when you have reached the mountain top, then you shall begin to climb. And when the earth shall claim your limbs, then shall you truly dance." Kahlil Gibran

His pain is at last gone, so here's hoping that Harley Payette is now truly free and dancing with The King.
Harley was 43, one year older than Elvis when he died.
It is way, way too young.

I am shocked and numb from the suddenness of it all.
In sadness,
- Piers


Very sad and shocking to read this.

I haven't posted on FECC for a couple of years, now, for a number of reasons, but I feel I can assert the following: a part of this place just died and will never be the same again.

Can someone please promise and take seriously the notion that this entire board needs to be properly archived with its many years of creditable and interesting contributions from a range of personalities, some of whom have either disappeared or become deceased? It sounds corny, but a part of these people's spirits is contained in their writings, and our understanding of Elvis -- and ourselves -- is enriched as long as their contributions (and some entertaining discussions their contributions are embedded within) endure. It would be a travesty if all that were suddenly lost, be it due to some technical failure, software glitch, virus, accidental deletion, or random human madness.

I can see why Elvis liked "The Prophet" so much. That's a beautiful prayer/epistle right there. 43 is hideously young by today's standards; and just one year older than Elvis -- while cogently pointed out, make no mistake -- has an ugly poetry to it that almost makes a mockery of the human condition. Will someone finish LTB's book for him, I wonder? I guess this is a question for another time, but I can't help wondering. I bet whatever LTB had already written down is worth reading in whatever form it's in. I think I'm going to go back and read some of his former posts now. Thanks for forwarding those messages, Piers. I raise a glass to LTB and thank him for passing this way in his journey through life.



Cryo,

I totally concur with your post. This is just shocking...too damn young...rest in peace, Harley...you were a VERY valuable part of this board and you will NEVER be forgotten...


Thank you, Tony. Too damn young, indeed.

phpBB [video]




rjm wrote:I'm sorry to make another post, but this is important. I said I wouldn't post another PM, but I missed this. It was the VERY last PM I got from him, and I have now made a decision based upon it.

I am not changing my current avatar. Ever.

Love your new avatar
Sent: Thu Dec 27, 2012 2:05 am
From: likethebike
To: rjm

Hi Robin- Just wanted to compliment your new avatar. I've never seen that picture before.

Hope you had a strong Christmas.

Harley


rjm


Can we hold you to that in ten years? :P

Anyway, for the time being, I can see why you'd be holding firm -- and your sig image, whether intended or not, is a perfect match.

Incidentally, LTB never had an avatar, did he? And he had a lowercase name at that. Yet we always knew who it was.

PiersEIN wrote:Harley sent me this article on "Elvis and doo-wop" several years ago, asking me to wait a while before we published it on-line. Most of you will not have seen it and today seemed the right day to remember his insightful writing and thoughts about the music world that he so loved....

Elvis And The Vocal Group Tradition:
Elvis Presley and doo-wop are not two phrases that normally go together. But, the vocal-group tradition was a profound part of the King's musical heritage, and the group sound's influence on Presley demonstrates the way the art form has infiltrated and informed pop music even if the sound is not visible on the surface.
But like blues, gospel and country, the vocal-group sound was where Elvis returned whenever he needed a shot of the real thing. It was a part of who he was.

Go here>>>
http://www.elvisinfonet.com/spotlight_e ... o-wop.html

In sadness - RIP Harley Payette
Piers


Nice work!! More fondness for older music comes shining through -- and yet again, the spotlighting of the way EP has at least been done a subtle disservice in music criticism generally. In other words, classic LTB.

rockinrebel wrote:I always liked the way he would write about the less celebrated songs and performances. These were the type of posts that made me dig out those recordings again, and often gave me a fresh perspective on them. I really hope the book he was working on will be published, as it would be a fitting tribute to a unique talent.


Absolutely.

Harley PM-ed me back in April 2009 after a lively thread about the "Fun In Acapulco" soundtrack had begun sparking up on the board.

I will now present his unadulterated thoughts from that PM.

(I figured I'd just offer the first paragraph, but reading the second and third, you get a fuller sense of LTB's investment in pop music and discussion generally -- he made it a habit to acknowledge multiple points and give a very nuanced reading about the stuff he liked).

Hi Cryo- Just wanted you to know I very much enjoyed your defense of the Fun in Acapulco soundtrack. I've always enjoyed this album. I feel stuff like this may not be "Mystery Train" but when in taken as part of the greater totality enriches Elvis' legacy. My favorite is "Marguerita" although your thoughts on "Bossa Nova Baby" reflect my own, particularly about the energy and wit of Elvis' performance. I used to have an attitude closer to the Doc's. I liked Elvis' singing on this song but disdained the material. However, I had kind of an epiphany with the song. I remember hearing the song about a decade ago at a Hard Rock and it just seemed more damned exciting than it had any right to be coming out of those speakers. It filled the place with energy. I also think some crowd members got excited when they heard it even though it was already 35 years old. Hearing it with fresh ears in a strange environment kind of shone a light on the song's appeal.

I have reservations about it though. The instrumental break I feels kills some of the mood. I think the biggest criticisms are that it's not a bossa nova, and as Escott points out the bossa nova originated in Brazil not Mexico. This is where I would come down with the Clovers as their version kind of has a bossa nova rhythm. Still, Elvis' version is much more exciting. I would definitely agree with the word you used. It definitely has "urgency." I think the flaws make it a little sillier than it should be and keep it from greatness, but it is a very good track.

About the lyric change, I don't Elvis' change was censorship as the doc argued. I think he changed for musical reasons, it sang better or he felt comfortable singing it. He did this all the time. It's still kind of an awkard line, but if you listen to Elvis' version, the wording just seems more natural.



* * *

I had a milestone birthday last month -- I turned 30. Just a mini-milestone, I guess, but one that was tinged with a bit of sadness, as I lost my paternal grandfather a few weeks before. He himself was 89 and was due to turn 90 in a couple of months' time. It's pretty unusual, I imagine, to have all four grandparents alive when they're all in their 80s and you're about to hit 30. Longevity seems to be on my side, but the sudden departure of one of them -- even with the health problems he had -- was still a cause for sadness.

Yet for that, news of LTB's passing hit me harder. Sounds odd, but there it is. For, as nice a man as he was, there was always some distance between me and my grandfather. There was no solid reason for it per se; it's just, to use a well-worn phrase, one of those things. I've always been closer to my maternal grandparents. Just seen them a lot more growing up, and into adulthood, I suppose. Plus, my grandfather was old and had gone downhill -- physically and mentally -- in recent years. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer's a couple of years ago, and last year, shortly before Christmas, he fell off a cliff, metaphorically speaking, and was taken to hospital after a couple of sudden (violent) outbursts, where a new diagnosis of vascular dementia was made. Four short months after that, while confined to care, we lost him entirely. Again, my grandfather was 89. LTB was only 43. That certainly, as they say, puts things into perspective. And I felt like I got to know LTB through his writings. That's what happens when people write as well and as thoughtfully and as long as LTB did.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Sun May 12, 2013 1:20 am

Cryogenic wrote:So many beautiful messages and thoughts have been entered into this thread.
* * *
I had a milestone birthday last month -- I turned 30. Just a mini-milestone, I guess, but one that was tinged with a bit of sadness, as I lost my paternal grandfather a few weeks before. He himself was 89 and was due to turn 90 in a couple of months' time. It's pretty unusual, I imagine, to have all four grandparents alive when they're all in their 80s and you're about to hit 30. Longevity seems to be on my side, but the sudden departure of one of them -- even with the health problems he had -- was still a cause for sadness.

Yet for that, news of LTB's passing hit me harder. Sounds odd, but there it is. For, as nice a man as he was, there was always some distance between me and my grandfather. There was no solid reason for it per se; it's just, to use a well-worn phrase, one of those things. I've always been closer to my maternal grandparents. Just seen them a lot more growing up, and into adulthood, I suppose. Plus, my grandfather was old and had gone downhill -- physically and mentally -- in recent years. ... Four short months after that, while confined to care, we lost him entirely. Again, my grandfather was 89. LTB was only 43. That certainly, as they say, puts things into perspective. A
nd I felt like I got to know LTB through his writings. That's what happens when people write as well and as thoughtfully and as long as LTB did.


Cryo,
THANKS for all the touching posts and thoughts about Harley.


I just want to tell FECC members that I have now printed out all these kind messages and sent them to Harley's family so they can understand how much he was loved and how much he was an important part of the FECC family.

In Sadness,
Piers

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Sun May 12, 2013 4:01 pm

PiersEIN wrote:
Cryogenic wrote:So many beautiful messages and thoughts have been entered into this thread.
* * *
I had a milestone birthday last month -- I turned 30. Just a mini-milestone, I guess, but one that was tinged with a bit of sadness, as I lost my paternal grandfather a few weeks before. He himself was 89 and was due to turn 90 in a couple of months' time. It's pretty unusual, I imagine, to have all four grandparents alive when they're all in their 80s and you're about to hit 30. Longevity seems to be on my side, but the sudden departure of one of them -- even with the health problems he had -- was still a cause for sadness.

Yet for that, news of LTB's passing hit me harder. Sounds odd, but there it is. For, as nice a man as he was, there was always some distance between me and my grandfather. There was no solid reason for it per se; it's just, to use a well-worn phrase, one of those things. I've always been closer to my maternal grandparents. Just seen them a lot more growing up, and into adulthood, I suppose. Plus, my grandfather was old and had gone downhill -- physically and mentally -- in recent years. ... Four short months after that, while confined to care, we lost him entirely. Again, my grandfather was 89. LTB was only 43. That certainly, as they say, puts things into perspective. A
nd I felt like I got to know LTB through his writings. That's what happens when people write as well and as thoughtfully and as long as LTB did.


Cryo,
THANKS for all the touching posts and thoughts about Harley.


I just want to tell FECC members that I have now printed out all these kind messages and sent them to Harley's family so they can understand how much he was loved and how much he was an important part of the FECC family.

In Sadness,
Piers


That's very thoughtful Piers.:)

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Sun Aug 18, 2013 10:13 am

I deeply regret being such a latecomer to this incredibly sad news.........I don't of course post much any longer, but I do come here when I need to do some research or to catch up a bit on news. But this bit of news I could have done without.

Rest in peace Harley. We disagreed on some subjects every bit as much as we agreed on others, but your essential kindness and generosity of spirit were always evident in either case.

I'll remember you..........long after this.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Sun Aug 18, 2013 12:45 pm

Was sad news indeed. I was lucky to have many chats with him off the board and he was a good guy.

Nice to see you around Scatter.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Sun Aug 18, 2013 4:16 pm

Nice to see you too TJ. You're precisely the same sort of guy as Harley. I miss our chats.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Tue Aug 20, 2013 1:46 am

Scatter! Nice to see you post. Unfortunate thread, but nice to see you....

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Tue Aug 20, 2013 4:10 am

Ah, there's my buddy!! Nice to see you too!! Still stunned over this.

Re: 'Like The Bike' - Sadly has passed away this morning.

Tue Aug 20, 2013 2:59 pm

Scatter wrote:Ah, there's my buddy!! Nice to see you too!! Still stunned over this.


For sure. Funny, very few of us really "know" anyone else here, but over time you learn the style/character of the members, and it does come as a big shock when that person is no longer here.