Off Topic Messages

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 3:37 pm

What's the difference between a prank call and a temperature? ..........Nurses can take a temperature! :lol:

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 3:49 pm

It was not the Djs responsibiility to put the call on air, get permissions etc. That was the job of the station and the programme's producer.

We should also ask how many people would be writing the same thing here about the prank if it had not had the consequences that it did? Would anyone even have cared enough to start a thread? Or are we only moralising about the call because events took the strange events that they did? The day after the call, Prince Charles was joking about it to the BBC, so he clearly didn't find it particularly distasteful or shocking.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:34 pm

elvisalisellers wrote:Who believes [despite the official statement put out] that the London hospital did not reprimand the poor woman?


According to my uncle who is a paramedic, she would've been seriously reprimanded for this despite the official statement.

The whole thing has been blown out of all proportion and I seriously believe the poor nurse had other issues going on and coupled with the fear of potentially losing her job was the straw that broke the camels back.

It's astonishing that the other nurse who actually had a conversation about Kate was fooled by a very terrible impersonation of the Queen. I've watched the two DJs in an interview and I do feel sorry for them, but what's done is done. They will live with the guilt and that's punishment enough.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:50 pm

I didn't know that she's not actually the nurse who didn't give out the information as Carolyn said? If the case is that she's the nurse that "forwarded" the call, then that's even more stupid. As tragic as "suicide" is in itself, I am more upset that someone takes their life and then causes mental anguish to their family and the others involved in this case (it really wasn't even that much of a prank, I heard it and was amazed at how tame it was)

This must have been the "last straw" as someone else said, it's just that there are many imbeciles worldwide who refuse to side with reason on this one. A prank in itself (especially not one of this nature) is not the cause of suicide, it's a 100% guaranteed there were other things going on in her life, and in a moment of emotion she did the deed.

The saddest part of all of this is that the prank was meant to be at the expense of the royal *cough* family, the joke had nothing to do with the nurses, and if the nurse didn't commit suicide we probably wouldn't even know about it. What can you do? You conduct a prank targeting one person, but someone else decides they are more important than everyone else and kills themselves.

It's a ****** up world.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:57 pm

intheghetto wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:It was not the Djs responsibiility to put the call on air, get permissions etc. That was the job of the station and the programme's producer.

We should also ask how many people would be writing the same thing here about the prank if it had not had the consequences that it did? Would anyone even have cared enough to start a thread? Or are we only moralising about the call because events took the strange events that they did? The day after the call, Prince Charles was joking about it to the BBC, so he clearly didn't find it particularly distasteful or shocking.


So then you're saying the fact that someone took their own life as a result of the prank isn't really that big a deal and we shouldn't make a big fuss about it, correct?


1) The general human experience should tell you, that this suicide is not a result of a single prank, it would have been a build-up of events and the prank just was the last straw.
2) The prank was tame, it wasn't even targeting the nurses, it was aimed at the royal family.
3) Have you even heard the prank?
4) Yes, we shouldn't make a big fuss about it, she's not coming back and what's the aim of your "fuss"? Just to cause more noise for no reason, nothing else going on in your life? What's the next step, ban prank calls? Get stuffed.
5) If it wasn't the prank, something else later along the line would have led her to commit suicide and then some other innocent person would be accused of pushing her to suicide, maybe the rude cashier at the supermarket, or the postman who didn't put the letter the correct way in the post-box :roll:

Get over it.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 5:58 pm

poormadpeter wrote:It was not the Djs responsibiility to put the call on air, get permissions etc. That was the job of the station and the programme's producer.

We should also ask how many people would be writing the same thing here about the prank if it had not had the consequences that it did? Would anyone even have cared enough to start a thread? Or are we only moralising about the call because events took the strange events that they did? The day after the call, Prince Charles was joking about it to the BBC, so he clearly didn't find it particularly distasteful or shocking.


If the nurse didn't commit suicide you wouldn't even know about it, it probably would not have left Sydney and would be a Youtube video with probably 1000 views today.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 6:01 pm

Robt wrote:Yes but you are (except perhaps poormadpeter) all overlooking one very important point: The issue of taping telephone conversations without the two nurses knowledge and consent.

My understanding is that it is unlawful, per the Australian Telecommunications Act, to record, let alone broadcast, a conversation without gaining the other parties prior consent. Just on that basis alone, I feel that the extremely naive "DJ's" should be facing charges. Having said that. there were more members of the commercial radio broadcast (who put the tape to air) were also involved in the prank and they too should be facing charges.

And as for gaining access to privileged information by way of fraudulent impersonation of a potentially entitled person, there would have to be a law proscribing such acts?

This is an example of why there is a real need for such regulation to be enforced (in this country) by the Australian Broadcast Authority including suspension of the Radio Station's licence.

Why should not electronic media broadcasters (not just australia as in this case but other countries) be held directly and seriously responsible for the consequences of their actions?


Do you even read the sh*t that you post?

Yes, let's start a new law

1avii) No prank calls allowed.

How exactly are you to enforce a radio law spanning two countries? By the way, radio broadcasts are always recorded, whether they call someone or not.

If they should face charges, then so should you for causing my suicide by writing sh*t. No, you didn't intend for my death, but it happened anyway because you didn't think before posting rubbish.

You might as well start walking over to the police station, I'll get the noose ready.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:15 pm

ECC83 wrote:
Robt wrote:Yes but you are (except perhaps poormadpeter) all overlooking one very important point: The issue of taping telephone conversations without the two nurses knowledge and consent.

My understanding is that it is unlawful, per the Australian Telecommunications Act, to record, let alone broadcast, a conversation without gaining the other parties prior consent. Just on that basis alone, I feel that the extremely naive "DJ's" should be facing charges. Having said that. there were more members of the commercial radio broadcast (who put the tape to air) were also involved in the prank and they too should be facing charges.

And as for gaining access to privileged information by way of fraudulent impersonation of a potentially entitled person, there would have to be a law proscribing such acts?

This is an example of why there is a real need for such regulation to be enforced (in this country) by the Australian Broadcast Authority including suspension of the Radio Station's licence.

Why should not electronic media broadcasters (not just australia as in this case but other countries) be held directly and seriously responsible for the consequences of their actions?


Do you even read the sh*t that you post?

Yes, let's start a new law

1avii) No prank calls allowed.

How exactly are you to enforce a radio law spanning two countries? By the way, radio broadcasts are always recorded, whether they call someone or not.

If they should face charges, then so should you for causing my suicide by writing sh*t. No, you didn't intend for my death, but it happened anyway because you didn't think before posting rubbish.

You might as well start walking over to the police station, I'll get the noose ready.



:shock: Err yes !

Aren't you overlooking the fact that the taped conversation had been broadcasted more than once even after the tragic death. Clearly the radio broadcaster acted irresponsiblely. Accordingly the station should be facing charges. Here read this , mate -


Prank Call Played For Hours After Nurse's Death


Even after Jacintha Saldanha's death had been confirmed by the King Edward VII Hospital, her voice could still be heard playing over the airwaves of 2Day FM, which had spent all week capitalising on the hoax which now appears to have driven her to suicide.
Hoax call ... 2Day FM presenters Mel Greig, left, and Michael Christian.

Hoax call ... 2Day FM presenters Mel Greig, left, and Michael Christian.

While Britain and much of the world was learning details of the mother-of-two's death, the Sydney-based radio station, seemingly unmanned, was repeatedly broadcasting the moment Mrs Saldanha was fooled into thinking two DJs were the Queen and the Prince of Wales.
Advertisement

Despite half-hearted apologies from both 2Day FM and the presenters earlier in the week, the independent station could not resist the opportunity to milk its notoriety.

As late as 5pm UK time Friday (4am Saturday AEDT), more than seven hours after Mrs Saldanha's death, 2Day FM's website was still plugging its royal scoop, which one of the presenters insisted was just a "big fat joke".

Incredible as it may now seem, the prank call, which was made at 5.30am English time on Tuesday (4.30pm Tuesday AEDT), was prerecorded and had been cleared for transmission by the radio station's lawyers.

The idea for the call came from Michael Christian, a presenter of the Summer 30 music show, who was barely known in Australia, let alone the rest of the world, having only started the job the day before.

His original idea was to try to speak to the Duchess of Cambridge herself, despite the fact that she was in hospital suffering from severe pregnancy sickness. He told listeners: "We've been handed a phone number and we have been told that this phone number is the hospital where Kate Middleton is currently staying.

"We thought we'd give it a call. We don't want to cause any trouble, we don't want to stress her out because she is doing it tough. But I reckon we could maybe get her on the radio tonight."

He told his co-presenter, Mel Greig, that she would have to pretend to be the Queen and he would be the Prince of Wales. "This is awesome!" Greig replied.

Christian said: "Let's give this hospital a call and see if we can get Kate Middleton or maybe even Prince Wills on the phone tonight. So the number is going in? ... oh Jeez, I hope this happens!"

Mrs Saldanha, a nurse who had worked at the hospital for more than four years, was at reception when the call came through. Greig, doing a poor impression of the Queen, said: "Oh hello there, could I please speak to Kate please, my granddaughter [sic]?"

Mrs Saldanha replied: "Oh yes, just hold on ma'am."

Hardly able to believe his luck, Christian said: "If this has worked, it's the easiest prank call we have ever made!"

Mrs Saldanha then put the call through to a nurse, who gave out confidential details of the Duchess's condition and treatment. Christian, in particular, could not wait to tell the world about his cunning. He wrote on Twitter: "2nd day on the Hot 30 Countdown and we've made NATIONAL NEWS!!"

The following day, as the hospital discovered it had been hoaxed, its chief executive, John Lofthouse, described the prank as "deplorable", pointing out that nurses were trained to care for people, not to "cope with journalistic trickery".

Mrs Saldanha, and the second nurse who spoke at greater length to Christian and Greig, were not disciplined or suspended by the hospital, which insisted it had given her plenty of support.

St James's Palace, meanwhile, made it clear to the hospital that it did not blame the nurses for what had happened and had sympathy for the two victims. But Mrs Saldanha was, in her own words, "a very nervous person" and friends said she would have been "hit badly" by the prank, which would have "played on her mind".

In Australia, the radio station realised it was facing a backlash from the public, two thirds of whom regarded the stunt as cruel, according to one poll.

2Day FM put out a brief apology for "any inconvenience caused" while Christian said "we were very surprised that our call was put through, we thought we'd be hung up on as soon as they heard our terrible accents".

He added: "We're very sorry if we've caused any issues and we're glad to hear that Kate is doing well."

His subsequent actions, however, and those of his employer, suggested that they were far from sorry. The following day Christian tweeted: "Still haven't heard the royal prank that has the world talking? Listen to it here..."

His most recent tweet, posted Friday at around 9am UK time (8pm AEDT), said: "It's almost show time! The latest on the royal prank is coming up..."

Around half an hour later, an ambulance was called to Weymouth Street, to what is understood to be hospital-owned premises near King Edward VII, where Mrs Saldanha was found unconscious. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Royal College of Nursing said: "It is deeply saddening that a simple human error due to a cruel hoax could led to the death of a dedicated and caring member of the nursing profession."

Mr Christian deleted his Twitter account at 5.15pm last night (4.15am AEDT). Greig had deleted hers several hours before him after a barrage of abuse.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:37 pm

Robt wrote:
ECC83 wrote:
Robt wrote:Yes but you are (except perhaps poormadpeter) all overlooking one very important point: The issue of taping telephone conversations without the two nurses knowledge and consent.

My understanding is that it is unlawful, per the Australian Telecommunications Act, to record, let alone broadcast, a conversation without gaining the other parties prior consent. Just on that basis alone, I feel that the extremely naive "DJ's" should be facing charges. Having said that. there were more members of the commercial radio broadcast (who put the tape to air) were also involved in the prank and they too should be facing charges.

And as for gaining access to privileged information by way of fraudulent impersonation of a potentially entitled person, there would have to be a law proscribing such acts?

This is an example of why there is a real need for such regulation to be enforced (in this country) by the Australian Broadcast Authority including suspension of the Radio Station's licence.

Why should not electronic media broadcasters (not just australia as in this case but other countries) be held directly and seriously responsible for the consequences of their actions?


Do you even read the sh*t that you post?

Yes, let's start a new law

1avii) No prank calls allowed.

How exactly are you to enforce a radio law spanning two countries? By the way, radio broadcasts are always recorded, whether they call someone or not.

If they should face charges, then so should you for causing my suicide by writing sh*t. No, you didn't intend for my death, but it happened anyway because you didn't think before posting rubbish.

You might as well start walking over to the police station, I'll get the noose ready.



:shock: Err yes !

Aren't you overlooking the fact that the taped conversation had been broadcasted more than once even after the tragic death. Clearly the radio broadcaster acted irresponsiblely. Accordingly the station should be facing charges. Here read this , mate -


Prank Call Played For Hours After Nurse's Death


Even after Jacintha Saldanha's death had been confirmed by the King Edward VII Hospital, her voice could still be heard playing over the airwaves of 2Day FM, which had spent all week capitalising on the hoax which now appears to have driven her to suicide.
Hoax call ... 2Day FM presenters Mel Greig, left, and Michael Christian.

Hoax call ... 2Day FM presenters Mel Greig, left, and Michael Christian.

While Britain and much of the world was learning details of the mother-of-two's death, the Sydney-based radio station, seemingly unmanned, was repeatedly broadcasting the moment Mrs Saldanha was fooled into thinking two DJs were the Queen and the Prince of Wales.
Advertisement

Despite half-hearted apologies from both 2Day FM and the presenters earlier in the week, the independent station could not resist the opportunity to milk its notoriety.

As late as 5pm UK time Friday (4am Saturday AEDT), more than seven hours after Mrs Saldanha's death, 2Day FM's website was still plugging its royal scoop, which one of the presenters insisted was just a "big fat joke".

Incredible as it may now seem, the prank call, which was made at 5.30am English time on Tuesday (4.30pm Tuesday AEDT), was prerecorded and had been cleared for transmission by the radio station's lawyers.

The idea for the call came from Michael Christian, a presenter of the Summer 30 music show, who was barely known in Australia, let alone the rest of the world, having only started the job the day before.

His original idea was to try to speak to the Duchess of Cambridge herself, despite the fact that she was in hospital suffering from severe pregnancy sickness. He told listeners: "We've been handed a phone number and we have been told that this phone number is the hospital where Kate Middleton is currently staying.

"We thought we'd give it a call. We don't want to cause any trouble, we don't want to stress her out because she is doing it tough. But I reckon we could maybe get her on the radio tonight."

He told his co-presenter, Mel Greig, that she would have to pretend to be the Queen and he would be the Prince of Wales. "This is awesome!" Greig replied.

Christian said: "Let's give this hospital a call and see if we can get Kate Middleton or maybe even Prince Wills on the phone tonight. So the number is going in? ... oh Jeez, I hope this happens!"

Mrs Saldanha, a nurse who had worked at the hospital for more than four years, was at reception when the call came through. Greig, doing a poor impression of the Queen, said: "Oh hello there, could I please speak to Kate please, my granddaughter [sic]?"

Mrs Saldanha replied: "Oh yes, just hold on ma'am."

Hardly able to believe his luck, Christian said: "If this has worked, it's the easiest prank call we have ever made!"

Mrs Saldanha then put the call through to a nurse, who gave out confidential details of the Duchess's condition and treatment. Christian, in particular, could not wait to tell the world about his cunning. He wrote on Twitter: "2nd day on the Hot 30 Countdown and we've made NATIONAL NEWS!!"

The following day, as the hospital discovered it had been hoaxed, its chief executive, John Lofthouse, described the prank as "deplorable", pointing out that nurses were trained to care for people, not to "cope with journalistic trickery".

Mrs Saldanha, and the second nurse who spoke at greater length to Christian and Greig, were not disciplined or suspended by the hospital, which insisted it had given her plenty of support.

St James's Palace, meanwhile, made it clear to the hospital that it did not blame the nurses for what had happened and had sympathy for the two victims. But Mrs Saldanha was, in her own words, "a very nervous person" and friends said she would have been "hit badly" by the prank, which would have "played on her mind".

In Australia, the radio station realised it was facing a backlash from the public, two thirds of whom regarded the stunt as cruel, according to one poll.

2Day FM put out a brief apology for "any inconvenience caused" while Christian said "we were very surprised that our call was put through, we thought we'd be hung up on as soon as they heard our terrible accents".

He added: "We're very sorry if we've caused any issues and we're glad to hear that Kate is doing well."

His subsequent actions, however, and those of his employer, suggested that they were far from sorry. The following day Christian tweeted: "Still haven't heard the royal prank that has the world talking? Listen to it here..."

His most recent tweet, posted Friday at around 9am UK time (8pm AEDT), said: "It's almost show time! The latest on the royal prank is coming up..."

Around half an hour later, an ambulance was called to Weymouth Street, to what is understood to be hospital-owned premises near King Edward VII, where Mrs Saldanha was found unconscious. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Royal College of Nursing said: "It is deeply saddening that a simple human error due to a cruel hoax could led to the death of a dedicated and caring member of the nursing profession."

Mr Christian deleted his Twitter account at 5.15pm last night (4.15am AEDT). Greig had deleted hers several hours before him after a barrage of abuse.


This is clearly an article with an agenda and not a straight news item. I don't think the BBC would refer to "half-baked" apologies, for example. Nor does this sound like legit news reporting:

"His subsequent actions, however, and those of his employer, suggested that they were far from sorry."


Your article also says that, yes, the tape was being broadcast after the death of the nurse - but it fails to state whether this was after the radio station learned of the death. I'm sure when news reached them, the tape was not broadcast anymore. Considering the quality of the article your are quoting, I would suggest taking the information within it with a pinch of salt.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:25 am

Robt wrote:
ECC83 wrote:
Robt wrote:Yes but you are (except perhaps poormadpeter) all overlooking one very important point: The issue of taping telephone conversations without the two nurses knowledge and consent.

My understanding is that it is unlawful, per the Australian Telecommunications Act, to record, let alone broadcast, a conversation without gaining the other parties prior consent. Just on that basis alone, I feel that the extremely naive "DJ's" should be facing charges. Having said that. there were more members of the commercial radio broadcast (who put the tape to air) were also involved in the prank and they too should be facing charges.

And as for gaining access to privileged information by way of fraudulent impersonation of a potentially entitled person, there would have to be a law proscribing such acts?

This is an example of why there is a real need for such regulation to be enforced (in this country) by the Australian Broadcast Authority including suspension of the Radio Station's licence.

Why should not electronic media broadcasters (not just australia as in this case but other countries) be held directly and seriously responsible for the consequences of their actions?


Do you even read the sh*t that you post?

Yes, let's start a new law

1avii) No prank calls allowed.

How exactly are you to enforce a radio law spanning two countries? By the way, radio broadcasts are always recorded, whether they call someone or not.

If they should face charges, then so should you for causing my suicide by writing sh*t. No, you didn't intend for my death, but it happened anyway because you didn't think before posting rubbish.

You might as well start walking over to the police station, I'll get the noose ready.



:shock: Err yes !

Aren't you overlooking the fact that the taped conversation had been broadcasted more than once even after the tragic death. Clearly the radio broadcaster acted irresponsiblely. Accordingly the station should be facing charges. Here read this , mate -


Prank Call Played For Hours After Nurse's Death


Even after Jacintha Saldanha's death had been confirmed by the King Edward VII Hospital, her voice could still be heard playing over the airwaves of 2Day FM, which had spent all week capitalising on the hoax which now appears to have driven her to suicide.
Hoax call ... 2Day FM presenters Mel Greig, left, and Michael Christian.

Hoax call ... 2Day FM presenters Mel Greig, left, and Michael Christian.

While Britain and much of the world was learning details of the mother-of-two's death, the Sydney-based radio station, seemingly unmanned, was repeatedly broadcasting the moment Mrs Saldanha was fooled into thinking two DJs were the Queen and the Prince of Wales.
Advertisement

Despite half-hearted apologies from both 2Day FM and the presenters earlier in the week, the independent station could not resist the opportunity to milk its notoriety.

As late as 5pm UK time Friday (4am Saturday AEDT), more than seven hours after Mrs Saldanha's death, 2Day FM's website was still plugging its royal scoop, which one of the presenters insisted was just a "big fat joke".

Incredible as it may now seem, the prank call, which was made at 5.30am English time on Tuesday (4.30pm Tuesday AEDT), was prerecorded and had been cleared for transmission by the radio station's lawyers.

The idea for the call came from Michael Christian, a presenter of the Summer 30 music show, who was barely known in Australia, let alone the rest of the world, having only started the job the day before.

His original idea was to try to speak to the Duchess of Cambridge herself, despite the fact that she was in hospital suffering from severe pregnancy sickness. He told listeners: "We've been handed a phone number and we have been told that this phone number is the hospital where Kate Middleton is currently staying.

"We thought we'd give it a call. We don't want to cause any trouble, we don't want to stress her out because she is doing it tough. But I reckon we could maybe get her on the radio tonight."

He told his co-presenter, Mel Greig, that she would have to pretend to be the Queen and he would be the Prince of Wales. "This is awesome!" Greig replied.

Christian said: "Let's give this hospital a call and see if we can get Kate Middleton or maybe even Prince Wills on the phone tonight. So the number is going in? ... oh Jeez, I hope this happens!"

Mrs Saldanha, a nurse who had worked at the hospital for more than four years, was at reception when the call came through. Greig, doing a poor impression of the Queen, said: "Oh hello there, could I please speak to Kate please, my granddaughter [sic]?"

Mrs Saldanha replied: "Oh yes, just hold on ma'am."

Hardly able to believe his luck, Christian said: "If this has worked, it's the easiest prank call we have ever made!"

Mrs Saldanha then put the call through to a nurse, who gave out confidential details of the Duchess's condition and treatment. Christian, in particular, could not wait to tell the world about his cunning. He wrote on Twitter: "2nd day on the Hot 30 Countdown and we've made NATIONAL NEWS!!"

The following day, as the hospital discovered it had been hoaxed, its chief executive, John Lofthouse, described the prank as "deplorable", pointing out that nurses were trained to care for people, not to "cope with journalistic trickery".

Mrs Saldanha, and the second nurse who spoke at greater length to Christian and Greig, were not disciplined or suspended by the hospital, which insisted it had given her plenty of support.

St James's Palace, meanwhile, made it clear to the hospital that it did not blame the nurses for what had happened and had sympathy for the two victims. But Mrs Saldanha was, in her own words, "a very nervous person" and friends said she would have been "hit badly" by the prank, which would have "played on her mind".

In Australia, the radio station realised it was facing a backlash from the public, two thirds of whom regarded the stunt as cruel, according to one poll.

2Day FM put out a brief apology for "any inconvenience caused" while Christian said "we were very surprised that our call was put through, we thought we'd be hung up on as soon as they heard our terrible accents".

He added: "We're very sorry if we've caused any issues and we're glad to hear that Kate is doing well."

His subsequent actions, however, and those of his employer, suggested that they were far from sorry. The following day Christian tweeted: "Still haven't heard the royal prank that has the world talking? Listen to it here..."

His most recent tweet, posted Friday at around 9am UK time (8pm AEDT), said: "It's almost show time! The latest on the royal prank is coming up..."

Around half an hour later, an ambulance was called to Weymouth Street, to what is understood to be hospital-owned premises near King Edward VII, where Mrs Saldanha was found unconscious. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Royal College of Nursing said: "It is deeply saddening that a simple human error due to a cruel hoax could led to the death of a dedicated and caring member of the nursing profession."

Mr Christian deleted his Twitter account at 5.15pm last night (4.15am AEDT). Greig had deleted hers several hours before him after a barrage of abuse.


You expect me to read all that? I briefly skimmed through it and if it were true that the station repeatedly played it after her death then yes, there should be some kind of action taken. That has nothing to do with the two D.J's however.

As I take it, if there is any "case" to be had over this, it is solely their insistence on playing it after it was known that she had committed suicide. Nothing before.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Wed Dec 12, 2012 10:49 pm

I suspect Morrissey will have some flak coming his way


http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/12 ... _hp_ref=uk

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Wed Dec 12, 2012 11:29 pm

daylon wrote:I suspect Morrissey will have some flak coming his way


http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/12 ... _hp_ref=uk


The man is mad. Quite why Middleton should feel shame when all she did was throw up in a hospital is anybody's guess!

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Thu Dec 13, 2012 9:10 am

The older Morrissey gets, the more tedious he gets.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Thu Dec 13, 2012 4:02 pm

The responsibility for a suicide falls on the victim themselves.

A company [for example] sacks umpteen employees.

For one of them, the impact on their lives is so great, they kill themselves.

Is that the employers' fault ?

Or, a woman dumps her partner; he commits suicide.

Again, is it her fault ?

If, during an argument, I call someone a 'lazy oaf' [or whatever] & they later top themselves, can I be held responsible for that ?

No - in all cases.

Re: Nurse who took prank call is found dead

Thu Dec 13, 2012 9:57 pm

quite agree Colin.........must have been something else going on in her life to 'tip her over'......