Off Topic Messages

DVD-R and DVD+R => Differences?

Thu Aug 17, 2006 11:21 pm

I've been experiencing some difficulties with DVD+Rs -- some refuse to play in my basic DVD machine.

Might anyone explain DVD-R versus DVD+R? Are there more than just aesthetic differences?

Thanks in advance for any helpful advice.

Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:40 am

Doc:

Per my manual for my Sony DVD recorder:

DVD+R: Playable on DVD+R compatible players.

DVD-R: Playable on most DVD players

So what I'm assuming, is that DVD-R is the most "common" format for playback on different machines. And it also mentions in the book, that you can only record 16:9 format on the DVD-R only. Don't know the accuracy of that myself, but that's what it says.

The only formats I personally use are the DVD-RW's and the DVD-R's.

Hope this helps.

Rich

Fri Aug 18, 2006 2:02 am

DJC.

What kind of hardware are you burning these discs on....a pc or a standalone dvd recorder??.....as there can indeed be a difference, particularly when it comes to standalone dvd recorders.

Fri Aug 18, 2006 3:12 am

Rich_TCB wrote:Doc:

Per my manual for my Sony DVD recorder:

DVD+R: Playable on DVD+R compatible players.

DVD-R: Playable on most DVD players

So what I'm assuming, is that DVD-R is the most "common" format for playback on different machines. And it also mentions in the book, that you can only record 16:9 format on the DVD-R only. Don't know the accuracy of that myself, but that's what it says.

The only formats I personally use are the DVD-RW's and the DVD-R's.

Hope this helps.

Rich


I also only use the DVD-RW/-R discs as they work on most players.

8)

Fri Aug 18, 2006 5:54 am

The two formats track the information differently.
Most machines will play both formats, as well as dvd-ram.

My 3 yr old Panasonic burner will only record on dvd-ram discs.
This posed a problem, as my home theatre dvd player wouldn't recognize
my dvd-ram discs ... so I had to buy a 3rd dvd player to play back my recorded discs.

The newer the machine, the more formats it will recognize and play back.
I bought an Elvis VCD, and had to buy a 4th machine to open up the file and play it. I literally took the disc into the box store and tried various machines ... a P.O.S. Dayco Korean player was the only one that would open up the file on the VCD.

Keep in mind, if your machine occasionally recognizes and plays dvd +r's, and at other times refuses to load them, then it is a sign that your laser pickup is going.

The newest dilemna is Toshiba HD-DVD versus Sony Blue Ray.
Both machines will play standard and burned dvd's, but neither machine
will play the other's HD discs.
Proprietary technology is what killed Beta, and it seems we haven't learned from our mistakes.

Fri Aug 18, 2006 11:01 am

Doc, here you can find some more specific info:
http://club.cdfreaks.com/showpost.php?p ... ostcount=3

Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:03 pm

Thanks to everyone who took a moment to reply to my query.

Fri Aug 18, 2006 2:20 pm

Its the Sony syndrome. They all want to break away and be the "standard". In the end, the consumer loses with a shredded market.

DVD+R's are what I used to use, till I found out it wasn't 100% unless it was a Sony DVD player.

I endorse DVD-R now! Too many other companies have jumped ship.

Sat Aug 19, 2006 7:03 pm

It resembles the old vhs v betamax battle, vhs of course becoming the standard, dvd-r is also becoming the standard.

Sat Aug 19, 2006 8:21 pm

Still, look at DVD Audio, it never took off. So SACD was a loser too.

HDDVD Vs Blue Ray is the latest thing.

I don't think either will take off because memory is getting too cheap. Moving parts will someday be a thing of the past.

Just got the Creative Vison M and it is quickly making me a believer in that regard.

My advice to people is buy a huge hard drive...maybe a couple of them. This may contradict my stance before, but memory is the future.

It all gets to me though, because zapping a harddrive could make anyone cry! So I guess for now DVDR works with this.

I got a 200 gig USB hard drive(which goes along with the 160 GIG add on as well as the 80 Gig factory) for a hundred bucks and it is damn near storing everything I need. It can only get better as time goes on!

Still, doing the math, DVDR is quite obviously cheaper....for now.

Sat Aug 19, 2006 9:59 pm

Harddrives are for current data.

But not for archieving.

Mon Aug 21, 2006 3:32 am

Why not??

I do think it is for massive at your finger tips data, which is of course like archiving. The difference is of course the whole "zapping" issue.

But then again, for entertainment purposes, it is all out there anyway, so why not??

Old pictures and all that, I can understand, then again, what is better??? DVD R...nope I don't think so!!! I had a few of those go bad too, enough to make you cry.

Mon Aug 21, 2006 11:48 am

Harddrives have proven unreliable for storage of music ...when not used for a while they get STUCK!

Mon Aug 21, 2006 11:51 am

With DVD+R I had a problem and just copied them to a DVD-R and Wala!!

Mon Aug 21, 2006 12:03 pm

I use only DVD-R and they work most of the time fine. I have two dvd-players. I bought the other one because it was region code free and it plays just about any format available. My other player which is pretty good one by Sony is now 4 years old and it sometimes has problems with some DVD-R's that I've burned on my computer. The same DVD-R discs play fine in the other player. It appears that the Sony player doesn't play discs that are burned 16 x speed. 8 x speed burned discs seem to work better but even those don't play sometimes.

Mon Aug 21, 2006 1:38 pm

genesim wrote: Moving parts will someday be a thing of the past.


Yeah................ for all of us.

Mon Aug 21, 2006 2:16 pm

Colin B wrote::Moving parts will someday be a thing of the past.


lol:

JLGB wrote:...when not used for a while they get STUCK!


Not a problem here!

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

The problem with the DVD+R that I had was reading it! If it could be read to be copied, then it was able to be played!

Though I admit having backup is alot simplier. I still think storage is becoming less and less a problem for huge hard drives.

Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:05 pm

genesim wrote:
JLGB wrote:...when not used for a while they get STUCK!


Not a problem here!
Seriously. A lot of folks in the music business have had problems thinking the hard drive their entire production was on would be ok after stored for years without play. They are experimenting with everything including freezing..Anyone that reads this should not be surprised if their hard drive goes kaput after storage.

Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:55 pm

I definately would make a backup of files on hd. If it crashes you lose everything.

Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:59 pm

genesim wrote:I endorse DVD-R now!

Same here. Stay away from Memorex discs when making your copies though. You'll end up throwing half of them away.

Tue Aug 22, 2006 12:36 am

Word to that! I used Memorex recently and got alot of coasters.

About this harddrive thing. My experience so far on a hard drive that is about 10 years old, has been just fine. Though mine is in constant use, remember that data can be covered. It hasn't dissapeared, it is just difficult to read.

With current harddrives, this is becoming less of a problem. Still backups are always good no matter what. Wit DVD storage, you can't go wrong having both!

Tue Aug 22, 2006 11:58 am

Don't DVD-R's have the same low life expectancy that CDRs have? Or are they made up differently?