Off Topic Messages

"The Wind That Shakes The Barley".

Mon Jul 17, 2006 2:52 pm

The recently released award winning movie "The Wind That Shakes the Barley" by Ken Loach about British army excesses in Ireland during our war of Independence has caused quite a commotion in the UK press. I hear the British are using their influence to prevent the movie being released in the USA.

Here in Ireland it is seen as an honest attempt to explain the events fairly.

The movie shows how innocent young men, one training to be a Doctor, are caught up in the violence perpetrated by foreign troops in the south of this island. Brutalised they turn to the gun and wage guerilla warfare on the British. They are now "terrorists! according to the powers that be in london.

Civil war follows and Irish men kill Irish men, often their neighbours.

A case of cause and effect. It is seen worldwide. Getting to the root cause of all "Terrorism" often sheds more light than some would want!!!

I grew up listening to stories of the brutal Black and Tans, breaking into my grandmothers home and terrorising men women and children alike.

Later. I learnt Irish history in English schools. Or did I?

A poem by the same name as the movie was published by Katharine Tynan

[edit]
Lyrics

I sat within the valley green, I sat me with my true love
My sad heart strove the two between, the old love and the new love
The old for her, the new that made me think on Ireland dearly
While soft the wind blew down the glen and shook the golden barley


'Twas hard the woeful words to frame to break the ties that bound us
But harder still to bear the shame of foreign chains around us
And so I said, "The mountain glen I'll seek at morning early
And join the bold united men, while soft winds shake the barley"


While sad I kissed away her tears, my fond arms round her flinging
A yeoman's shot burst on our ears from out the wildwood ringing
A bullet pierced my true love's side in life's young spring so early
And on my breast in blood she died while soft winds shook the barley


But blood for blood without remorse I've taken at Oulart Hollow
And laid my true love's clay cold corpse where I full soon may follow
As round her grave I wander drear, noon, night and morning early
With breaking heart when e'er I hear the wind that shakes the barley.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_that_Shakes_the_Barley"
Categories: Ballads of 1798 rebellion | Irish songs

Mon Jul 17, 2006 4:25 pm

Haven't seen it yet, but by all accounts it attempts to show the reasons behind the hatred felt by the IRA, and their sypathisers, towards the British in recent times.

Seems they had good cause to feel bitter !

Tue Jul 18, 2006 10:49 am

Colin, The Irish do not hate the British people.

Just the British establishment and the armies they sent to try and conquer the indomitable Irish.

Cromwell was the worst. Another religious fanatic!!! Ask King Charles :wink:

The movie despite the low budget is very good. I never saw an Irish audience leave a cinema so quietly and so deep in thought.

Of course I know the story inside out, upside down, and crossways.

Being a voracious reader can destroy one's peace of mind............it's a jungle in here :lol:

Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:11 am

MauriceinIreland wrote:Colin, The Irish do not hate the British people.

Just the British establishment and the armies they sent to try and conquer the indomitable Irish.


Well, that's what I meant by 'the British' !

As you are so well-read on the subject, can you tell us how well the film depicts the events ?

Tue Jul 18, 2006 11:49 am

It's a harrowing tale from the beginning as it shows the brutality of the Black and Tans towards simple Irish farmworkers etc. They kill one guy because he refuses to answer their questions in English.

That propels the locals to form a band of IRA volunteers. They set about ambushing the British troops, and killing them.

A cease fire is called. The Infamous treaty is signed in London. The IRA split over the six Northern counties and and a brutal civil war ensues.

Now that's it in a nutshell.

Now you read the fifty books and hear the millions of words on Irish history, or take a short cut http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_T ... the_Barley :lol:

Tue Jul 18, 2006 1:21 pm

MauriceinIreland wrote:It's a harrowing tale from the beginning as it shows the brutality of the Black and Tans towards simple Irish farmworkers etc.


Let me re-phrase my question:

"How faithfully are the real events from Ireland's history depicted in the film ?"


That's what you haven't answered.

Tue Jul 18, 2006 2:09 pm

How the hell should I know? I wasn't there at the time :lol:

Seriously. From all accounts it was an honest attempt to portray the events realistically. My view is Ken Loach tried his best to be accurate.

I have seen him a few times on TV facing up to critics of the movie. He is obviously an intelligent man and he really went to town on the tabloid journalists. He didn't take any prisoners :D


From my parents and relatives I received many different versions of what happened during our War of Independence. Many of my relatives uncles AND aunties were part of the Old IRA. So I have heard first hand of their experiences.

My take on the movie is it's too close for comfort!

But Judge Judy does not accept hearsay :wink:


Irish, English, American, Canadian, etc Historians according to their bias tell the story in great detail. A discerning reader will draw his/her own conclusions.

I was raised as a catholic so I confess the movie mirrored my boyhood imaginings.

Now go see the movie, AND read the books................. lazybones :lol:

Tue Jul 18, 2006 2:15 pm

MauriceinIreland wrote:How the hell should I know?
I wasn't there at the time :lol:


Well, you're the one who's read the fifty books on the subject !

Anyway, thanks for your take on the film.

I was just worried that Ken Loach might have shown a tiny bit of anti-British bias [a la Mel Gibson] but I don't think that's the case.

Tue Jul 18, 2006 2:28 pm

James Joyce a famous Irish writer wrote six hundred pages about the events of one day in his 'Book of the Century', "Ulysses".

So fifty books about years of guerilla warfare hardly cover the period in great depth :lol:

Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:17 pm

Colin, if you don't believe Maurice has read those 50 books, he'll show you: He'll cut and paste something he Googled today from China's Xinhua News Service to prove it.

Sure, it'll ony be tangentially related to his mistaken conclusion, but you don't expect him to read the whole article, do you?

After all, when a guy has to blather on about himself endlessly, he can't be expected to read all the way to the bottom of a newspaper article.

Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:35 pm

I'm really getting to you elvissessions.com :lol:

I'm quite eclectic in my taste Image

Remember the Alamo? John Wayne was quite a pussy when it came to standing up to just one guy, movie Director, John Ford :wink:

But what a fine fighter in "The Quiet Man" set in Ireland. The guinness helped I guess?

Maureen and I had dinner in the Randolph room in the Warwick Hotel New York 2001......but that's just me blathering on again :lol:

A very interesting book about Hearst.
I've just finished a biography on Katherine Hepburn and another on Maureen O' Hara...she was recently back in Ireland.............we met an "elderly" lady recently in the Malahide Castle cafe who went to school with Maureen. A very articulate and well educated woman.

Not at all like a redneck :lol:

Tue Jul 18, 2006 3:48 pm

At the risk of being accused of engaging in cultural stereotyping, are you drunk right now, sir?

Tue Jul 18, 2006 4:14 pm

I have not been drunk since..................er.......let me see.........er........1996

When I drove home a six foot nine Danish guy and his six foot wife from a hotel seven miles from here, where one was often locked in till they closed the bar..................those were the days.........Ger would have loved the place :lol:

Gotta go out now into the Texas like sunshine and the 30 centigrade temperature here in Ireland!.........our car will be like a furnace.

Open the sun roof Maureen............. I'm on my way............

Tue Jul 18, 2006 5:28 pm

Why would Ken Loach show any sort of anti-British bias, isnt he English? I think he is a fanastic director who really manages an air of authenticity to his period pieces. Looking forward to seeing this movie but I will wait for the dvd release. Ive sworn myself off cinemas for the time being, maybe Im getting old and cranky but it seems each time I visit one I seem to attract the kids or morons who want to talk all through the movie. I'll stick with my own home cinema for the time being.

Tue Jul 18, 2006 5:44 pm

Eddie wrote:Looking forward to seeing this movie but I will wait for the dvd release.


You might not get much choice !

The powers-that-be have ganged-up to ensure that this film only gets a very limited theatrical release in the UK !

Tue Jul 18, 2006 6:10 pm

ColinB wrote:
Eddie wrote:Looking forward to seeing this movie but I will wait for the dvd release.


You might not get much choice !

The powers-that-be have ganged-up to ensure that this film only gets a very limited release in the UK !


It will be interesting to see if many in the "Land of the Free" get to see it too.

The DVDs will sell like hot cakes :lol:

I'm sure the Irish Empire will see to that. Yes we formed an Empire by peacefully colonising the United States, England, Australia, Canada, Continental Europe, and the rest of the world. An Irish pub will soon open in outer Mongolia :wink: