Off Topic Messages

The Twilight Zone-The Complete Series on DVD

Sun Jul 02, 2006 9:11 pm

Image Entertainment has announced a street date of October 3rd for The Twilight Zone - The Complete Definitive Collection. This 28-disc set will feature all of the extra's from the previous releases, but at a fraction of the cost. While the individual season sets retailed for about $100 each, this set carries a price of $299.99, though you can definitely count on that being greatly discounted especially the first week of release.

Tom

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Mon Jul 03, 2006 1:39 am

Hello Tom. That's good to hear, I've always been a fan of the late-great Rod Sterling. I believe this is my first post here, but I often check the board and appreciate what you contribute. Thanks again.

Mon Jul 03, 2006 5:03 am

This is great news Tom! I've held off buying this classic series on dvd due to the hefty price of the individual sets. There's so many classic episodes but my favorites are the hitchhiker, and the howling imprisoned man who's the devil.

By the way Tom, any news on the release of another volume of Night Gallery?

Mon Jul 03, 2006 8:56 am

Great stuff! I saw the season sets recently for an okay but not great price at COSTCO (in the USA) - $59 each.

I have many episodes on VHS (taped from a marathon on NY's WPIX years ago) but would love the DVD's. I used to live for a time in his old home town of Binghamton, NY, where Elvis did some great concerts in '77 (before I was there.) Lots of subtle references to Binghamton in the series, by the way.

Also, SCI-FI channel is doing a marathon as we speak...

*************
"Mess'.." : welcome aboard!

Mon Jul 03, 2006 10:52 am

that is great news but i have bought all the boxsets i could not wait i love the show that much. i allso got the 2 80s show boxsets and the new one from 2002 but it would be great to get all the classic rod sterling ones all in one box.

Mon Jul 03, 2006 6:43 pm

Pete Dube wrote:By the way Tom, any news on the release of another volume of Night Gallery?


Earlier this year there was a rumor that season 2 would street in August, but I've heard nothing more since then. I do know that Universal is spending more money (and therefore time) on restoring the season 2 episodes as they got several complaints about the quality of season 1. In all honesty, I would not be surprised to see season 2 out by the end of the year.

Tom

Mon Jul 03, 2006 11:16 pm

Is it the pilot of episode of NIGHT GALLERY that I remember most of all? Had several stories, including one with Joan Crawford...and another one about a former Nazi hiding in Argentina?

Very spooky show and basically the "Zone" with a new title, color film, and a more mod late '60s feel.

Mon Jul 03, 2006 11:53 pm

I missed that one. These all look cheaper, ironically, then the film-noir like old "Zone," but are totally freaky to watch just the same.

Tue Jul 04, 2006 4:26 am

Yeah the opening to Night Gallery was pretty creepy with those faces and the music. The pilot episode also had the one with Roddy Macdowell and Ossie Davis with the painting that kept showing scenes of the dead uncle leaving his grave and heading for the mansion. That was scary!

Tue Jul 04, 2006 9:07 am

Yes, Mr. Fever and Mr. Dube, the opening and that Roddy McDowell story...
:shock:

Cre-epy! Now that's the good old spirit of old "scary movies" (Monster movies and otherwise), which hinted at the macabre but spared us the slice and dice, blood and guts nonsense, most of which was mainly stomach-turning, not truly frightening.....

Cue that series up on Halloween, I say...

Tue Jul 04, 2006 10:37 am

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Is it the pilot of episode of NIGHT GALLERY that I remember most of all? Had several stories, including one with Joan Crawford.


Yes! Joan Crawford was in the episode entitled "Eyes" directed by non other that Steven Spielberg!
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JEFF d
EP fan

Wed Jul 05, 2006 3:03 am

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote: Now that's the good old spirit of old "scary movies" (Monster movies and otherwise), which hinted at the macabre but spared us the slice and dice, blood and guts nonsense, most of which was mainly stomach-turning, not truly frightening.....


Greg -
I really regret that the old-school horror films have gone by the wayside. Thankfully the classic Universal films are available on those great dvd collections. The Hammer films also are available including 2 multi-film collections. Hammer did kick off the more explicit horror film, but by today's standards they're pretty tame. What they shared with the Universal films is good acting and writing.

If you want to see a real good one check out Night of the Demon (AKA Curse of the Demon). I recently picked this up on dvd and was pretty impressed.

Wed Jul 05, 2006 7:54 am

Pete, I'm hardly a true horror afficianado (besides growing up on my brothers' compie of "Famous Monsters"magazine, which mostly celebrated the hey day of Lon Chaney, Dracula, etc.)...so what are the "classic Universal films" and the "Hammer films"? I

Thanks for the tips.

Wed Jul 05, 2006 9:15 pm

This is good news for those who don't have the collection already. I am a big fan of Rod Serling and the Twilight Zone. I bought the series at Costco, and let me tell you these episodes look FANTASTIC the restoration is second to none. I am also excited to hear season 2 of Night Gallery is being worked on. I would like to see a DVD collection of Serling's Pre-Zone work for 'Playhouse 90' and 'Studio One' released.

Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:22 am

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Pete, I'm hardly a true horror afficianado (besides growing up on my brothers' compie of "Famous Monsters"magazine, which mostly celebrated the hey day of Lon Chaney, Dracula, etc.)...so what are the "classic Universal films" and the "Hammer films"? I

Thanks for the tips.


Greg -
In my opinion the Universal classic must haves are: Frankenstein; Bride of Frankenstein; Son of Frankenstein; Dracula; The Wolfman; Creature From The Black Lagoon; The Invisible Man; The Mummy (I find this last one a bit slow and much prefer the Hammer version). In addition, although not a Universal film I would also highly recommend the 1932 Frederick March version of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde.
Classic Hammer films: Horror of Dracula; Curse of Frankenstein; The Mummy; The Revenge of Frankenstein; Hound of the Baskervilles; Brides of Dracula; The Abominable Snowman; Curse of the Werewolf; Dracula - Prince of Darkness; Plague of the Zombies; The Devil Rides Out.

I loved Famous Monsters of Filmland when I was a kid!

Thu Jul 06, 2006 4:43 am

Pete- I must disagree with you on "The Mummy". For me, for all its slowness, the original 1932 version provides a much deeper satisfaction than the Hammer movie. It's has a kind of dreamy romanticism and poetry that's missing from the later movie. It also has one of Karloff's truly great performances. You have to stay with it but to me it's a really rewarding movie with a great sense fate and doom.

I would say in general before the Universal team started to crank out monster product in the 1940s, the Universals in general have more depth than the Hammer series although to modern eyes the Hammer stuff might be more entertaining. The Hammer movies strive for simple entertainment but the early Universals go for something a little more and for me they hit it. Even in something as creaky as Dracula, I find it expresses the loneliness of the character and his repulsion at what he is better than any other movie interpretation even though the other movies are often more entertaining overall. I also find the humor in the Universal movies more effective than the Hammer stuff. Nothing compares with Ygor in "Son of Frankenstein".

I would also include "The Black Cat" in essential Universals. It introduced the theme of devil worship to the horror vocabulary but it also demonstrated the corrupting factor that evil can have on the human soul. The expressionistic sets are stunning, great work from both Karloff and Lugosi. It's just a haunting movie.

I remember the Joan Crawford part in "Night Gallery". It was very sad with a shocking twist. She buys her eyes from Tom Bosley. It was definitely a portent of greater things to come from Spielberg.

I thought the show overall was hit and miss.

Great news about the Zone although it's a little out of my price range.

Thu Jul 06, 2006 5:13 am

LTB -
I like the Karloff Mummy, but I just feel the Hammer film was more suspenseful. It also had something the Karloff film for the most part lacked: the mummy!

Unlike the Universal films (which were limited by the standards and technology of the time) the Hammer films took a grand guignol approach to horror.

If you want to see a fun, affectionate homage to the old-school monsters check out The Monster Squad.

Thu Jul 06, 2006 5:17 am

Since this thread is about a classic fantasy/sci-fi show here's another: The Outer Limits.

Thu Jul 06, 2006 7:08 am

Yes, Pete, I recall that show as well, although I saw it years later on cable. I believe Showtime (or was it USA Network?) revived it in the '80s via re-runs, and possibly Channel 9 ("WOR") in New York played it, as LTB may recall. I think it was also played on WPIX (Channel 11) in NYC when the Yankees had a rain delay. Message? Serious time-filler, although the superior "Zone" also was used that way.

It seemed to be to be a cheap cousin of "The Twilight Zone," having its moments but running way too long at an hour each, as the "Zone" later did as well. Still, I wish I could come across it while flicking through the channels these days. I'd watch it. If nothing else, they represnent a long-gone era of TV (on pacing alone!) that I'm sometimes nostaligic for.

Yes, the Gallery was just a shadow of the Zone but it was enough of Serling's baby to be interesting. If you ever can see it, PBS has shown in the past a great one-hour biography about Serling, from his youth in Binghamton,NY (his boyhood home is still much like it was, by the way) to his triumphs and later disappointment with Hollywood, including a candid (and smoky) early '60s interview with Mike Wallace, and his last years in Ithaca, NY as a teacher. Inspiring and heartwarming to see...

Yes, Pete and LTB, those were the "monster movies" I recall. I just haven't boned up on what is what. Pete, I noticed on a bigger newstand that there's some kind of retro-version of FAMOUS MONSTERS still in existence, which I've been planning to buy on a lark. I still have some FM issues packed away with old comics. Those things probably caused some brain damage as a kid, as they not only had stark photos of the classic era movies, but also features on what we now know as super-low-budget '60s and early '70s flicks.

They've only gotten scarier. :shock: :lol:

Fri Jul 07, 2006 3:59 am

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Yes, Pete, I recall that show as well, although I saw it years later on cable. I believe Showtime (or was it USA Network?) revived it in the '80s via re-runs, and possibly Channel 9 ("WOR") in New York played it, as LTB may recall. I think it was also played on WPIX (Channel 11) in NYC when the Yankees had a rain delay. Message? Serious time-filler, although the superior "Zone" also was used that way.


That brings back memories Greg. Where I grew up in Connecticut channel
11 was WPIX and channel 9 WOR. ABC was channel 7 (channel 8 out of New Haven), CBS was channel 3 (channel 2 out of Hartford). NBC was channel 4. Channel 5 was, like 9 and 11 an independent out of New York, but I can't recall the station letters.

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote: It seemed to be to be a cheap cousin of "The Twilight Zone," having its moments but running way too long at an hour each, as the "Zone" later did as well. Still, I wish I could come across it while flicking through the channels these days. I'd watch it. If nothing else, they represnent a long-gone era of TV (on pacing alone!) that I'm sometimes nostaligic for.


Oooh, I wouldn't say OL was a cheap knock-off of TZ. It was more sci-fi oriented, and tended to feature a monster of the week, but it could also be very well written. 2 episodes in particular stand out: The Chameleon -A very young Robert Duval is a burnt-out government agent/assassin who must infiltrate an alien landing party by being transformed into one of them. The Architects of Fear - Robert Culp is a government scientist who is physically changed into an alien being by fellow scientists as part of a scheme to land at the U.N. and scare the world leaders into ending war.

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Yes, Pete and LTB, those were the "monster movies" I recall. I just haven't boned up on what is what. Pete, I noticed on a bigger newstand that there's some kind of retro-version of FAMOUS MONSTERS still in existence, which I've been planning to buy on a lark. I still have some FM issues packed away with old comics. Those things probably caused some brain damage as a kid, as they not only had stark photos of the classic era movies, but also features on what we now know as super-low-budget '60s and early '70s flicks.

They've only gotten scarier. :shock: :lol:


About 12 years ago I ran across an issue of Famous monsters in the magazine section of an area bookstore. It had been at least 20 years since I'd seen one, so I picked it up and started thumbing through it. It became apparent from the letters page that the editor, Forrest J. Ackerman had recently revived the magazine. Right there in that store, reading those moving letters my childhood came flooding back and I started to get a bit tearful. I bought the magazine (an issue dedicated to my favorite childhood monster, the Wolfman). However, it's my understanding that someone seized control of the magazine from Ackerman (AKA Uncle Forry, or the Ackermonster, or Dr. Acula). There's some bad blood between the parties.