Off Topic Messages

1964- Pop Music's All Time Greatest Year?

Thu Apr 06, 2006 8:19 am

Was 1964 the greatest year ever for popular music? I would think you could make a very good argument for that case. In terms of legends working at or near the top of their game, the depth of great tracks, the amount of influence and the diversity of great music it’s hard to beat.

In 1964 of course will be forever known as the year of the Beatles and with good reason. The Beatles dominated the pop music scene in a way that only Elvis had approached before. What’s more, with their good cheer and enthusiasm of their music they erased a lot of the gloom of the Kennedy assassination. That was a big part of the scale of their accomplishment and that created a pop culture snowball in which everyone wanted to partake. This set the stage for the youth pop culture juggernaut of the next four decades. 1964 also marked the birth of many of the Beatles’ best and best known pieces including “A Hard Day’s Night”, “I Should Have Known Better”, “And I Love Her”, “I Feel Fine”, “Can’t Buy Me Love” as well as definitive Beatles’ classics like “She Loves You”, “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” and their version of “Twist and Shout” that were just becoming well known outside the UK. All these tracks are marked by an euphoric quality that bottles the joy of being alive in its best moments.

The Beatles were just the beginning of a full scale British Invasion of the US and a lot of diverse music came pouring into the States and around the world in this first and best year of the British Invasion. There were beat Beatles knockoffs like the tremendously underrated Dave Clark Five who gave us in short order the torrid rockers “Glad All Over”, “Can’t You See That She’s Mine”, “Bits and Pieces” their remake of “Do You Love Me” and the loud as hell “Any Way You Want it” along with the beautifully melodic “Because.”

Operating from a blues base were the Animals and their remake of the traditional American standard “House of the Rising Sun”. With Eric Burdon’s ostentatious but powerful vocal and Alan Price’s funhouse organ. It is one of pop’s most baroque pleasures.

The Stones also operated from a blues base. They made their bones with their definitive version of “Time is on My Side”, “Tell Me You’re Coming Back” and their remake of “It’s All Over Now” which was inferior to the Valentino’s (Womack Brothers) original but still a great record. While this was just the openers for this great group, you can’t deny the power of these records.

The Invasion also gave us the Kinks and their pre-punk jagged guitar chord classic “You Really Got Me” and the pre-folk rock of the Searchers “Needles and Pins”. There was also the invigorating approximation of recent American trends with Manfred Mann’s great nonsense single “Doo Wah Diddy Diddy” a remake of an Exciters’ record and Dusty Springfield’s great girl group knockoffs “Wishin’ and Hopin’” and “I Only Want to Be With You”.

The British music scene so effectively remade classic and current American music that they reinvigorated some American performers like Brenda Lee who cut “Is it True” one of her very best and most hard rocking tracks in England with a British Band led by none other than Jimmy Page.

Were the British Invasion all that was happened in 1964, it would be a major year. It was just the tip of the iceberg. Slowly but surely a Minnesota born, Greenwich Village based singer songwriter named Bob Dylan was developing a reputation as the most important songwriter in the world. Dylan, who would dominate the attitude and agenda of popular culture in the coming years, was changing the lyrical content and themes as well as the structure of the popular song and its role in society. (A smart cookie, Dylan recognized the changes wrought by Elvis and his contemporaries in the 1950s and made the performer’s role as instrument of change in contemporary culture overt.)

Already a God within folk circles, Dylan was just starting to achieve popular acclaim and notice. His The Times They Are-a-Changin’ became his first Pop Top 20 album as well as becoming a popular anthem in this year and throughout the decade. (Not one of my favorite Dylan songs but hey it was an important song.) His other 1964 album Another Side of Bob Dylan only solidified his genius spawning some of the decade’s best loved songs “All I Really Want to Do”, “Chimes of Freedom”, “My Back Pages” and “It Ain’t Me Babe”.

Dylan wouldn’t change notions about popular singing and the relationship between an artist and his audience until a year later but his 1964 achievement was enough.

The other prong of the pop revolution was, of course, the Motown sound which by this time had really become its logo- “The Sound of Young America”. With a roster of diverse and great songwriters, producers and performers the label fulfilled the promise of integration in early inherent in early rock and roll. A black record by a Motown artist with its mixture of teen lyrics, uptown production and gospel shouts became as mainstream as a Beatles’ record. In fact, it was more mainstream in that it was a sound where everyone was listening. The early Beatle records didn’t mean a lot to African-American audiences at the time but the Motown records sure meant a lot to white kids and black kids alike.

Every piece of the Motown arsenal was on full blast in 1964- the Miracles’ “I Like it Like That”, Martha and the Vandellas’ “Dancing in the Streets” (an anthem), Marvin Gaye’s “You’re a Wonderful One” and his duet Mary Wells’ “Once Upon a Time”, the Temptations “The Way You Do the Things You Do”, The Four Tops’ “Baby I Need Your Loving” Brenda Holloway’s “Every Little Bit Hurts”, the Supremes’ streak of super hits “Where Did Our Love Go”, “Baby Love” and “Come See About Me” and so many others- all spine tingling examples of this new cultural hybrid. There was so much great music being done at the label that the Top 40 couldn’t hold it all. Soul fans to this day love the Miracles “Would I Love You”, Martha and the Vandellas’ “Live Wire”, Eddie Holland’s “Leavin’ Here” as much as the bigger hits listed above.

The Motown sound was emblematic of the way two different strands of the American Popular music experience were also contributing. One was the full blossoming of soul music. 1964 was the final year of Sam Cooke’s life. In that year, Cooke’s art as singer/arranger and composer made a tremendous leap with tracks like “Good Times”, “That’s Where it’s At” and of course “A Change is Gonna Come” all of which appeared on his 1964 LP Ain’t That Good News which is probably his finest LP. Cooke’s SAR label was midwifing the careers of future stars like Bobby Womack, Johnnie Taylor and Lou Rawls while giving us great records like the Womacks’ “It’s All Over Now” and little brother LC’s “Put Me Down Easy”.

Solomon Burke was another great soulster operating at the peak of his power. In 1964, Burke gave us “The Price”, “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love”, “Goodbye Baby (Baby Goodbye)” and a scintillating remake of Jim Reeves’ “He’ll Have to Go.” ‘

King James Brown did “Out Of Sight” and “Oh, Baby Don’t You Weep”. Ray Charles gave us the pop country swing hybrid “Baby Don’t You Cry” and the great country weeper “No One To Cry To.” Jackie Wilson made a very nice pop soul dance album. And Chuck Jackson provided a unique piece of soul sadism in “Beg Me.”

The other trend represented by Motown’s success was the distinct regional sounds of certain cities. Chief among these were Chicago sound which had a sizzling streak of soul dance hits in Major Lance’s “Um Um Um Um Um”, the Impressions’ “I’m So Proud”, “Talking About My Baby” and the socially conscious “Keep on Pushin’”, Barbara Lewis’ gorgeous “Spend a Little Time” and Jerry Butler’s “I Stand Accused”. Memphis was red hot with Otis Redding doing “Come to Me” and “Chained and Bound” and Willie Mitchell at Hi Records going Top 40 with his instrumental “20-75”.

The British Invasion only upped the games of the existing American kingpins- the Beach Boys, the Four Seasons and Phil Spector who all pushed rock music closer to self-conscious art with increasingly sophisticated production and lyrics on tracks “Don’t Worry Baby”, “I Get Around”, “Rag Doll”, “Walking in the Rain” and Spector’s year end mega masterpiece “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling” which crept into the Top 40 Christmas week.

Although it’s written that the British Invasion wiped out the existing pop scene, there were still plenty of fragments throughout the year that hung around and many of them were brilliant. I’m thinking of the Girl Group sound which was charting new courses with the Spector sound, Shadow Morton’s mini tragicomedies with the Shangria Las, and Motown acts like the Supremes. However, there was plenty of great old school girl group stuff all over the charts like the Dixie Cups’ “Chapel of Love” a #1 hit, the Butterflies’ touchingly teenage “Goodnight Baby Goodnight” and Betty Everett’s “Shoop Shoop Song”. Even doo wop was hanging around with the Devotions’ “Rip Van Winkle” and a re-charting from (1962) of the Showmen’s “It Will Stand” (a very appropriate record in this year).

Blues made a brilliant statement on the pop charts as Bobby Blue Bland was at the top of his game with “Ain’t Nothing You Can Do” (a Top 20 pop single), “Ain’t Doing Too Bad” and “Share Your Love With Me” a big R/B if not pop hit.

Country found a place with Buck Owens’ and his “Together Again” which would go on to become a country standard. Johnny Cash also contributed one of his signatures in “Understand Your Man”.

Early ‘60s pop rockers Del Shannon, Roy Orbison and Gene Pitney all got second winds and came up with some of their best stuff in “Oh, Pretty Woman,” “It’s Over”, “Keep Searchin’” “It Hurts To Be in Love” and “I’m Gonna Be Strong.” While the Drifters’ went “Under the Boardwalk.”

Elvis was momentarily down but not out. He chipped in at least two essential pieces of the year’s great pop tapestry in “Viva Las Vegas” and “It Hurts Me”, both now considered Presley classics, and was a constant presence in the Top 40 even if much of that presence was oldies like “Such a Night”, “Ain’t That Loving You Baby” and “Kiss Me Quick.”

Chuck Berry popped out of jail with a second string of hit singles all ranking with his very best. The Everly Brothers even returned from a two-year Top 40 hiatus with the driving “Gone Gone Gone” a track that acknowledged the British Beat Boom.

Even classic pop and jazz were cooking. Dean Martin staged a major career resurrection with “Everybody Loves Somebody” which even at this late date became a signature song. Frank Sinatra, not at his best, found a way into the Top 40 waiting for his full scale commercial reemergence a year later. And, almost under the radar, Bobby Darin recorded a version of “More” that would in years to come be acclaimed as the definitive rendition of that MOR standard.

Bacharach and David in their recordings with Dionne Warwick reinvigorated the traditional pop sound by fusing it with gospel and elements of the new pop rock scene on tracks like “Walk on By” that set new standards for sophisticated pop expression.

On the jazz front, John Coltrane only just happened to release his definitive statement in A Love Supreme which used the LP format to its extreme. Coltrane was not alone as rockers, popsters and soul artists were also becoming increasingly alerted to the merits of long play expression. Based solely on Dylan, Coltrane and the Beatles’ LPs it was a milestone year in that department. However, others like Cash, Cooke and even Martin were finding a niche’ there as well.

You could argue that X year was more influential or held more great albums or singles but you can’t argue this kind of depth and diversity and popular acceptance. It’s unmatched. That so much different music was out there and mostly reaching a popular audience indicates that 1964 was a year of transition. The best thing about these years though is that they have a little something for everybody and having more of that any other 12 month period makes 1964 the greatest year in pop history.

Thu Apr 06, 2006 8:49 am

All that in one year! not bad. glad to see Bob Dylan got a mention

'It hurts me' is not exactly a classic when it comes to public standards. ask some body who has heard that song by anyone, let alone Elvis, and i think a majority in a way would'nt know it. but it is classic because of the depth of emotion and committment in the performance, but i can't say classic in public terms

Thu Apr 06, 2006 9:21 am

I include "It Hurts Me" not for its public recognition (even though it did make Top 40 then) but because it's an example of the height of Elvis' artistry. Similarly I don't think Jerry Butler's "I Stand Accused" would rate much public recognition but among soul fans it's considered a classic.

Thu Apr 06, 2006 9:31 am

likethebike wrote:I include "It Hurts Me" not for its public recognition (even though it did make Top 40 then) but because it's an example of the height of Elvis' artistry. Similarly I don't think Jerry Butler's "I Stand Accused" would rate much public recognition but among soul fans it's considered a classic.


Yes, there was a lot going on in 1964 !

R 'n' R got its 'second wind' !

What a pity Elvis' popularity was on such a low at that time.

The Viva Las Vegas film was a success, but his best music was hidden away on 'B' sides or album tracks.

Thu Apr 06, 2006 9:35 am

Colin, you are one of the veterans on this board. what was it like in 1964 with Elvis, with this big revolution of new bands and singers and different kinds of songs. how was Elvis received round your area in that year?

Thu Apr 06, 2006 9:55 am

Scott Haigh 781990EP wrote:Colin, you are one of the veterans on this board. what was it like in 1964 with Elvis, with this big revolution of new bands and singers and different kinds of songs. how was Elvis received round your area in that year?


By 1964, we Elvis fans were getting embarrassed !

I've already written about that Beatles edition of Juke Box Jury [it may have been late '63] where we had these four young mop-heads, the latest smash-hit, red hot, heart throb, teen singing sensations, giving their reactions to the new single releases of the day.

I was praying that they didn't play the new Elvis single, but they did !

And Elvis' answer to this new music ?

I squirmed as that corny old album-track-put-out-as-a-single, Kiss Me Quick was played !

They seemed as embarrassed as I was !

Paul tried to say something positive:

"Sounds like Blackpool on a sunny day" meaning the kiss-me-quick hats and all that, but overall their reactions were luke warm.

The single didn't make the top 10.

We fans knew that Elvis was still cutting some good stuff, but the public heard only things like Kissin' Cousins, Do The Clam, or old album tracks put out as singles.

While the rest of the world was rocking again !

Sad times.

Thu Apr 06, 2006 1:53 pm

LTB, as usual brilliantly written. It was a year where you caught a lot of new and hungrier artists in terrific form and unfortunately EP's music (though he did have a few excellent songs this year) was not as relevant on the music scene. Those things happen, sometimes artist's lose their way. I do feel bad for the older fans such as Colin, ( no offense my friend) who felt embarrassed by what our guy was putting out. I'm wondering, given the competition from fresher artists, (at least in the public's eyes) would it have mattered the quality of music EP put out this incredible year? How much did the phenominal success from so many different artists take away from EP's music? Am I making sense?

Thu Apr 06, 2006 2:28 pm

Joe Car wrote:I do feel bad for the older fans such as Colin, ( no offense my friend) who felt embarrassed by what our guy was putting out.

...........................None taken.

Joe Carr wrote:I'm wondering, given the competition from fresher artists, (at least in the public's eyes) would it have mattered the quality of music EP put out this incredible year?
How much did the phenominal success from so many different artists take away from EP's music?
Am I making sense?


The annoying thing was that, given the right material, Elvis could have wiped the floor with all the competition in 1964.

As if acknowledging that Elvis' current stuff couldn't cut it, the colonel started issuing old tracks as singles: from 3 years ago [Kiss Me Quick], 4 years ago [Such A Night] and 6 years ago [Ain't That Loving You Baby] to try and show that Elvis could rock like the newcomers did.

This backfired badly, with these 'old' tracks sounding even more old-fashioned compared with the fresh, new sounds coming from the 'new' boys !

Never before did Elvis need a decent, rocking, commercial, relevant hit like he did then !

Such a pity that Memphis Tennessee got away !

Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:09 pm

ColinB wrote:The annoying thing was that, given the right material, Elvis could have wiped the floor with all the competition in 1964.

As if acknowledging that Elvis' current stuff couldn't cut it, the colonel started issuing old tracks as singles: from 3 years ago [Kiss Me Quick], 4 years ago [Such A Night] and 6 years ago [Ain't That Loving You Baby] to try and show that Elvis could rock like the newcomers did.

This backfired badly, with these 'old' tracks sounding even more old-fashioned compared with the fresh, new sounds coming from the 'new' boys !

Never before did Elvis need a decent, rocking, commercial, relevant hit like he did then !

Such a pity that Memphis Tennessee got away !


Colin -
Ain't That Loving You Baby wipes the floor with Memphis! Did you know at the time that ATLYB was a 1958 track? When I got Gold Records Vol. 4 for Christmas '76 I thought it was an early 60's track. Maybe it was the stereo sound and the exceptional sound mix featured on that album. I agree that Kiss Me Quick was a dumb choice. But why did the high quality Viva Las Vegas/What'd I Say single fail to make a significant dent on the charts?
LTB -
You failed to mention Johnny Rivers. I know you're not particularly found of him, but he was one of the few American artists holding the fort for old-style rock & roll/rhythm & blues during the height of the British invasion.

Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:15 pm

Excellent writing LTB. Edit not to take from subject.
Last edited by Juan Luis on Sat Apr 08, 2006 4:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

Thu Apr 06, 2006 6:53 pm

Pete Dube wrote:Colin - Ain't That Loving You Baby wipes the floor with Memphis! Did you know at the time that ATLYB was a 1958 track? When I got Gold Records Vol. 4 for Christmas '76 I thought it was an early 60's track. Maybe it was the stereo sound and the exceptional sound mix featured on that album. I agree that Kiss Me Quick was a dumb choice. But why did the high quality Viva Las Vegas/What'd I Say single fail to make a significant dent on the charts?


You're looking at things retrospectively !

At the time, so many new sounds were around, Elvis singles just sounded 'dated'.

Releasing old tracks simply emphasised that.

As I said somewhere else on here just the other day, Viva Las Vegas was seen/heard as 'just another film song' then.

All the stuff can be appreciated more now.

And we realise the limitations of a lot of the other music from then.

But at the time, it was 'hot' !

Elvis wasn't.

Thu Apr 06, 2006 11:53 pm

Pete- I forgot a lot of good stuff including Jan and Dean's "Dead Man's Curve" super classic, Lesley Gore's "You Don't Own Me" and "Maybe I Know", Little Anthony and the Imperial's "Going out of My Head" just great stuff.

I'm not sure Elvis' decline was in direct correlation with the quality of the music he was releasing. As Pete pointed out the excellent "Viva Las Vegas"/"What'd I Say" sold relatively modestly despite the great success of the movie. And in this era when flip sides outstripped the "A" side with great frequency fans still chose "Kissin' Cousins" over "It Hurts Me" which was an early blue eyed soul record was probably a few months ahead of its time.

It may have been simply been Elvis' time to drift a bit back from the spotlight. From 1956 to 1963, he ruled the roost all alone (in 1963 he showed signs of slipping) and eight years is a long time at the top, an eternity really.

Fri Apr 07, 2006 12:21 am

likethebike wrote:I'm not sure Elvis' decline was in direct correlation with the quality of the music he was releasing.....
It may have been simply been Elvis' time to drift a bit back from the spotlight.
From 1956 to 1963, he ruled the roost all alone (in 1963 he showed signs of slipping) and eight years is a long time at the top, an eternity really.


Well, of course, we'll never know now, will we ?

But if Elvis had been at the top of his game, and still lost out to the newcomers, we would have felt that at least it was a fair fight !

As it was, we were forever left wondering what would have happened if if only he'd had something good out.

Something contemporary, relevant, rocking, commercial............

Viva Las Vegas & the other things just didn't cut it, I'm afraid.

Some have gained in status over the years, but just weren't 'right' for the mid-sixties.

Fri Apr 07, 2006 1:30 am

A great write up likethebike ! 1964 was truely a great year. Also surf music was at it's peak with great songs from the obvious: The Beach Boys and Jan and Dean.

1964 was also a great year for car enthusiasts as some great models and styles were released............Thunderbird, GTO, and my favourite..........Cadillac ! 8)

Fri Apr 07, 2006 5:23 am

To compile a "Best of '64" cdr song collection, what list of songs would you stack?

Fri Apr 07, 2006 5:24 am

ColinB wrote:What a pity Elvis' popularity was on such a low at that time.

When a performer stops making an effort to create anything of value, as Elvis did by diving headlong into Hollywood hell, it doesn't take the public long to look for something else.

LTB - I sincerely hope your writing is being published somewhere, it's that good. Thanks for your comments, most of which I think are right on the money, yeah - yeah - yeah - yeah!

DJC

Fri Apr 07, 2006 8:19 pm

LTB - Fantastic! Thanks for taking the time to post these pieces.

The Beach Boys made many great records in '64. Away from the obvious, such as I Get Around, I think '64 was also the year of When I Grow Up To Be A Man which is, for me at least, one of Wilson's finest compositions.

It's a grown up song, from the perspective of a kid, and features an unusual accompaniment. Of course, these experiments with arrangements would bear fruition with Pet Sounds and Good Vibrations two years later.

And let's not forget The Who, who recorded their debut I Can't Explain in November (?) '64 and who had set alight the London live scene with their powerhouse Marquee residencies.

Sat Apr 08, 2006 12:23 am

Colin -
What about Ain't That Lovin' You Baby? Did you know it was a 50's track when released back in '64? What did you think of it?

As far as Viva Las Vegas goes, I have to confess that, while I think it's good, I also think it's been somewhat overrated in recent years. I've always prefered What'd I Say.

Sat Apr 08, 2006 12:42 am

Pete Dube wrote:Colin -
What about Ain't That Lovin' You Baby? Did you know it was a 50's track when released back in '64? What did you think of it?

As far as Viva Las Vegas goes, I have to confess that, while I think it's good, I also think it's been somewhat overrated in recent years. I've always prefered What'd I Say.


Well, yes !

The fact that they were putting out old Elvis tracks on singles was well known at the time.

Ain't That Loving You Baby was a good, rocking little song, but not relevant to 1964 !

Just read LTB's piece on all that was going on then !

There was a whole 'new' wave of rock 'n' roll happening, a different, more tuneful, more 'pop-oriented' sort of rock; Elvis and the colonel just didn't have any answer to it !

Sat Apr 08, 2006 1:27 am

Just come across this - great piece LTB!

Sat Apr 08, 2006 3:14 am

Thanks for comments one and all.

Londonflash- The omission of "When I Grow Up to Be a Man" was just for space and not a slap at the tune's obvious quality. Similarly, the Four Seasons' "Dawn" is at least an equal to "Rag Doll" but it would be difficult to get down all the seminal music from this most seminal year.

Dr.- I think you're being unfair with Elvis in 1964 at least. The January session was a session for music's sake although the two highlights- "Memphis" and "It Hurts Me" were buried on a 1965 album and a 1964 B-side. Further, "Viva Las Vegas" was a quality film with a quality soundtrack. It wasn't exactly consistent with the latest trends but it was work of high professionalism and energy. And the soundtrack- with the saloon ballad "I Need Somebody to Lean On", the remake of "What'd I Say" which featured the largest Elvis arrangement to that time and the towering title song with Doc Pomus' great rhymes and description of the allure of the city, the rhythm and arrangement that married Latinate dance rhythms to rock and swing and Elvis' greatly relished vocal- was a work of ambition. Of course it was recorded in 1963. Still, though of what was released in 1964 only "Kissin' Cousins" represented a lack of effort. The ambition level of "Roustabout" was modern but the supporting cast was good and production values were good and Elvis was professional.

Joe Car- As Colin pointed out that the diversity and the exploration did make Elvis' work seem out of the loop. The oldies probably sounded like oldies which doesn't mean "Such a Night" is not a good track but it didn't sound like 1964. It made seem as if Elvis was not with it. Even more a track like "It Hurts Me" was out of the spotlight and really about a year ahead of its time. A track like "Viva Las Vegas" is so eccentric, it was kind of out of time really. However, in 1964 it probably seemed very 1963 which was one of the last years where Latin influenced sounds were a major presence in Top 40.

Sat Apr 08, 2006 6:27 am

To show how many were looking to ANYTHING of value from Elvis during this time..just look at Crying In The Chapel as a POP hit in 1965 at #3.

Furthermore the fact it was yet another back catalog item because of the obvious dissapearance of non soundtrack albums in the mid 60's as well as a complete abandonment at one point.

The Beatles were great and they ruled, but ther were alot of factors that let them thrive.

With Chuck Berry in trouble, Little Richard proclaiming himself a preacher, Buddy Holly and Ritchie Valens dead of course people are gonna turn to something else.

Hell take a look at Brian Wilson. Having a nervous breakdown and having one of the biggest screwups ever by not releasing the Smile album at a crucial time in music history.

YET Elvis prevails by the end of the decade. Without the "fall", would the comeback have been so great. As it stands, chartwise, Elvis dominated in the 50's and was second ONLY to the Beatles. nuff said.

Sat Apr 08, 2006 7:23 am

likethebike wrote:Dr.- I think you're being unfair with Elvis in 1964 at least. The January session was a session for music's sake although the two highlights- "Memphis" and "It Hurts Me" were buried on a 1965 album and a 1964 B-side. Further, "Viva Las Vegas" was a quality film with a quality soundtrack. It wasn't exactly consistent with the latest trends but it was work of high professionalism and energy. And the soundtrack- with the saloon ballad "I Need Somebody to Lean On", the remake of "What'd I Say" which featured the largest Elvis arrangement to that time and the towering title song with Doc Pomus' great rhymes and description of the allure of the city, the rhythm and arrangement that married Latinate dance rhythms to rock and swing and Elvis' greatly relished vocal- was a work of ambition. Of course it was recorded in 1963. Still, though of what was released in 1964 only "Kissin' Cousins" represented a lack of effort. The ambition level of "Roustabout" was modern but the supporting cast was good and production values were good and Elvis was professional.

You're not being honest. The VLV sessions were in mid-1963, and the Jan '64 session comprised just three songs. He'd not bother with another formal studio session for almost two and a half years. He'd make no tours whatsoever. "Girl Happy" and "Tickle Me" were mediocre and anachronistic, and the latter didn't even feature a new soundtrack. If that isn't failing to make an effort, especially given the explosion of pop culture in 1964, you'll have to show me a better dictionary.

genesim wrote:Hell take a look at Brian Wilson. Having a nervous breakdown and having one of the biggest screwups ever by not releasing the Smile album at a crucial time in music history.

Um, the Smile sessions are circa1966-67, well outside the time frame of the subject LTB presents. In 1964, Brian's innovations in the studio were landmark -- and heard by all on Capitol Records.

DJC

Sat Apr 08, 2006 4:57 pm

I mentioned 1965 as well. I also mentioned the 50's.

So no I wasn't just speaking of 1964.

I know quite well the time frame of the Smile material. I don't need a "know it all" like you to point it out to me.

Then again, I guess it wouldn't be the same otherwise. Keep trying Doc, perhaps you will come up with another "wit" gem. :P

Sat Apr 08, 2006 7:41 pm

I know quite well the time frame of the Smile material.

What you evidently don't "know quite well" is how to reply in a manner that remains on topic.

Here's an idea: try reading the subject line before typing, it might help you comprehend what the poster is hoping to discuss. Then again, given your track record, that is doubtful.

DJC