Off Topic Messages

Thu Mar 30, 2006 7:25 am

I remember that interview but I didn't remember it with Spector. Unfortunately, my copy of the book has been long lost.

The thing that really gives the book its kick all these years later is the relative freshness of the interviews. The stuff on the comeback was basically done in the midst of it or just after it. Hopkins' research was closer in time to most of the 1950s stuff than we are from "Smells Like Teen Spirit" today.

Thu Mar 30, 2006 6:00 pm

Great point. And Jerry Hopkins had access to people from the owners of Crown Electric to Marion Keiser to Steve Binder or Bones Howe (essentially right after the Singer TV special) or Steve Sholes (via '66 interview with someone else) who were gone by the time of the first Guralnick opus. Or in the case of Phil Spector, no longer so easy to pin down for an interview...

He's there for the TTWII filming and other Vegas comeback gigs of '69-70.

Hopkins "Elvis" is also tighter narrative and less of the fine detail that Guralnick specializes in but also tends to get foggy and bogged down with...

I also like his pithy analysis of his movies and songs and even chapter focus. A chapter on how Col. Tom Parker operated..a chapter on the fans...Just when you've had enough of one aspect of his life, he shifts focus.

And the fact that it's from 1970 is kind of cool too. Elvis' rise, fall and comeback arc is completed. He's pretty much peaked but isn't done yet.

Hopkins got a touch of that Rolling Stone writing style (he was on staff) so it's also quite fresh and modern as opposed to the stiff or biased writing that a '50s writer would have. He's got a wry, subtle sense of humor but never inserts his bias or presence like Goldman nor is he as absent or as annoyingly translucent as Guralnick is at times.

Hopkins is clearly fond of the subject without being too fawning or unwilling to call junk what it was. I disagree here and there but the overall picture still works.

Tue Apr 04, 2006 2:31 pm

Melanie wrote:I reported the profile error to the IMDb editors, explaining why the credit ought to be deleted, refering to http://www.elvis.com/news/images/68_spe ... redits.pdf
The updates will be examined and, if approved, will normally appear on the site within 2-4 weeks.


update:

IMDb has now deleted his '68 Comeback Special producer credit.
And for the record I got no explanation from the editors as to why it appeared on the page in the first place. Actually you always have to proof possible entries, additions and corrections. Then again considering the amount of profiles it's probably very difficult to detect all errors.

http://imdb.com/name/nm0817489/

Tue Apr 04, 2006 3:18 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Great point. And Jerry Hopkins had access to people from the owners of Crown Electric to Marion Keiser to Steve Binder or Bones Howe (essentially right after the Singer TV special) or Steve Sholes (via '66 interview with someone else) who were gone by the time of the first Guralnick opus. Or in the case of Phil Spector, no longer so easy to pin down for an interview...

He's there for the TTWII filming and other Vegas comeback gigs of '69-70.

Hopkins "Elvis" is also tighter narrative and less of the fine detail that Guralnick specializes in but also tends to get foggy and bogged down with...

I also like his pithy analysis of his movies and songs and even chapter focus. A chapter on how Col. Tom Parker operated..a chapter on the fans...Just when you've had enough of one aspect of his life, he shifts focus.

And the fact that it's from 1970 is kind of cool too. Elvis' rise, fall and comeback arc is completed. He's pretty much peaked but isn't done yet.

Hopkins got a touch of that Rolling Stone writing style (he was on staff) so it's also quite fresh and modern as opposed to the stiff or biased writing that a '50s writer would have. He's got a wry, subtle sense of humor but never inserts his bias or presence like Goldman nor is he as absent or as annoyingly translucent as Guralnick is at times.

Hopkins is clearly fond of the subject without being too fawning or unwilling to call junk what it was. I disagree here and there but the overall picture still works.


What a great review, Gregory. I can't wait to read this book now! It's still in print, yeah? Otherwise, I'll have to dig it up on eBay.

Keith Richards, Jr.

Tue Apr 04, 2006 3:54 pm

The biography on Elvis Presley by Jerry Hopkins is being reissued in the UK by Plexus Publishing in September this year.

400 pages; ISBN: 0859653919

Source: Elvis Information Network


Last year I received the old version (used) as a gift. I couldn't bring myself to read the entire book, because the yellowish pages are in a terrible condition. But I suppose it's nice to have it in the collection and anyway never look a gift horse in the mouth. I might upgrade and purchase the reissue.