Off Topic Messages

Looking for another movie like Lost In Translation

Sat Mar 04, 2006 5:19 pm

Ok...the haters can step aside.

After seeing this movie numerous times, I really think the damn thing is a masterpiece! I not only enjoy the story, but it is also a pure pleasure to watch along with it being a sonic DTS wonder!

Any other suggestions for a touching story that also has the look and sound?

This of course rules out older movies, of which I have seen plenty.

But what about something from the last 10 years that has been a real find...perhaps not as well known?

I had mentioned the Three Color Trilogh(Blue, White, and Red). Anyone??

Sat Mar 04, 2006 5:31 pm

By the way, one thing I did notice. The ending to the movie was very much the same shot as 9 1/2 weeks starrign Kim Basenger and Mickey Rourke. A twist, that makes it that much more enjoyable to me!

Sat Mar 04, 2006 6:12 pm

Last line of the movie....maybe.

Bob: "Hey you."

They embrace each other.

Bob: "You wanna see a better performance? Go up there right now and tell him that you love him. OK?"

Charlotte: "OK." [sigh]

Sat Mar 04, 2006 9:47 pm

I loved the film because I connected with it emotionally.
It's all in the nuances.

Bob's parting words?

I think it [the whisper] was intended as their 'private moment' that the audience isn't a part of — that's why you can't hear it. I thought part of the beauty of this story was that nothing could ever work out between Charlotte and Bob outside of this little chance meeting in a strange land, even if they tried — friends or otherwise. And they would never get back the same feeling and experience they shared together, no matter how hard they tried or wanted. But that's just me!

In my opinion all these movies have a similar atmosphere / mood.

Amélie (France)
Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind
Garden State
Royal Tennenbaums
Before Sunrise & Sunset (the most comparable)
films by Wim Wenders

Sat Mar 04, 2006 11:18 pm

Brokeback Mountain. (It's not a Cinemax gay porn, it is actually a deep and thought provoking movie...)

It has slow pacing like Lost In Translation, and this description by Melanie fits BM to a tee:

I thought part of the beauty of this story was that nothing could ever work out between [the guys] outside of this little chance meeting on [Brokeback Mountain], even if they tried — friends or otherwise. And they would never get back the same feeling and experience they shared together, no matter how hard they tried or wanted. But that's just me!

Sat Mar 04, 2006 11:45 pm

First of all, the quote I posted sounds accurate. After listening to it a while with the volume up, I can make it out pretty good.

I think the relationship is uneven. Bob is speaking from experience, Charlotte has puppy love.

The difference with the statement is that Bob was dishonest with himself by giving some lame excuse about needing a jacket to see her one more time. That was the "performance". Of course the lie will be when she goes back to her life with the idiot. The smile to me, is the realization that she will probably divorce him and look for greener pastures.

Bob wasn't unhappy to the extent that he would leave, but I do think that the moment filled a void that he had for a long time before. A "glimpse" was all he needed.

As for the experience, I don't think it is so much that it couldn't be duplicated, it is the fact that it isn't based on reality. It just would have never worked. Unconventional with today's movies, and I am glad they picked the path they did when making the movie.

XXXXXXXx

Seen Eternal Sunshine. Loved it, and it is another great one. Royal Tennenbaums another thought provoking movie, but I don't enjoy it as much.

Amelie PERFECT! Great example. For a lesser, but similar experience(as far as style)..Yi Tu Mama Tambien. I liked the movie alot, but be warned, very explicit for family viewing, and very much a downer unlike the fore mentioned.

Before Sunrise and Sunset, never seen. Which one is better???

Garden State, add that to the list.

Brokeback Mountain, I wannna see this one bad. Can't wait!

Sun Mar 05, 2006 4:41 am

Geno,
When did you turn into a film critic..........................................................................and a girl?

Tom

P.S. just kidding.

Sun Mar 05, 2006 8:30 am

I love great films, and I have always subjectively picked them apart.

As for the "girl" comment. Go back and watch the movie. Nothing "girly" about Lost In Translation. Bill Murray's character is not exactly Heroic in that regard.

The tag line at the end, says it all(or doesn't :lol: ).

If one wants to really look at the movie, Charlotte made Bill Murray cheat, cause a cold shower just wasn't going to cut it!

Sun Mar 05, 2006 4:42 pm

genesim wrote:Before Sunrise and Sunset, never seen. Which one is better???


They were both great movies, but I prefer the sequel.
Watching the trailers might give you an idea. :?
http://videodetective.com/

How about Magnolia?
Or City Of God?


Or the mini-series "Empire Falls" ?
Maybe not that comparable, but I really enjoyed the story.

Sun Mar 05, 2006 9:06 pm

Well Magnolia goes without saying, cause Paul Thomas Anderson is my favorite director.

As for City of Gold and Empire Falls..another to the list. I am thankful for all contributions.

Mon Mar 06, 2006 9:15 am

Genesim- Has often commented on movies on the board and often with a great deal of insight and passion.

Mon Mar 06, 2006 8:32 pm

Hey genesim!

Lost In Translation is a magnificent movie - funny, enchanting, touching, arresting, provoking and moving. It is one of three "perfect" movies I have had the pleasure of watching at the cinema in the last five years. The other two are: A.I.: Artificial Intelligence and A History of Violence. Neither of these movies really resemble LIT or are probably what you're looking for (though "A.I." is absorbing and moving in some similar ways) - but you really should see them. They stand right up their with Sofia Coppola's masterpiece. Of course, these comments are entirely subjective, and stem solely from my own opinions. Things get very complicated after that...

Here are three more great films from last year that are just "bubbling under" (i.e. exceptionally well-made but with some nagging flaws)...

- Crash
- Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith
- Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit

I've yet to see the likes of Brokeback Mountain and Garden State. I look forward to having the opportunity to do so. I severely doubt you can wrong with films so highly acclaimed.

Are you into political thrillers? Sounds like an oxymoron, I know - but there's one my dad raved about and showed me: Thirteen Days. I was impressed. It's all about the Cuban Missile Crisis. It's bizarre that this pivotal moment in human history doesn't get more coverage. This film is involving and carried by strong performances. (Costner is about the only recognisable face; relative unknowns, and brilliantly cast actors, play John and Bobby Kennedy).

Now, if you'll permit me to roll the clock back as far as seven years ago, I'd just like to throw a foreign one in:

- Kikujirô no natsu (This is about a criminal that befriends a little boy and helps him seek out the mother he's never even seen. Really touching. The most "Lost In Translation"-esque of all my recommendations. Remember that!)

EDIT: Oops. I read your opening remarks too hastily; I thought you said "last five years"! OK... "last ten years" really opens up the door. There have been some great ones put forward.

I think the likes of City of God, Good Will Hunting and L.A. Confidential simply HAVE to be seen. Only "Good Will Hunting" is "feel good" of those three, so, keeping in mind your original stipulation, here are two others to perk you up: Dave (I'm cheating: 1993) and Scent of a Woman (cheating again: 1992) - two relatively unremarkable films (nowhere near as sophisticated as LIT) made remarkable by stellar lead performances.

Are you an Eastwood fan? See his movies! Especially: Unforgiven, A Perfect World and Million Dollar Baby (we've moved out the "feel good" territory again). If you're a film buff, as you seem to be, you've probably encountered these already. So, time to present the "ace up my sleeve"...

If you're looking for THE most impactful movie ever, only one has really done it for me. Warning: we're definitely not talking "warm n fuzzy" here anymore! It was made in 1982, but chances are, you haven't even heard of it (seems to be one of those films that just slips under the radar)...

Sophie's Choice

You have not seen acting until you have seen this film. Meryl Streep delivers an absolutely earth-shattering performance. Forget Brando. Forget Pacino. Forget everyone. Watch this thing. It's not a feel good movie at all - but it is an absolute MUST SEE.

Tue Mar 07, 2006 4:21 am

Thx LTB!

Cryongenic,

History Of Violence, Crash, Kikujirô no natsu-Def on my list to see.

A.I. I liked it, but I hate the typical Spielbergh feel good endings.

Star Wars..any of them. KICK ASS NUFF SAID!

Scent Of A Woman!!! Hello PACINO baby! Never "forget" him.

L.A. Confidential. Love it.

Good Will Hunting. Watched it recently. To me, the movie is good, but hasn't aged well with me. Multiple watches just doesn't cut it.

A Perfect World another one of my favorites.

Million Dollar Baby..respectable, but not his best. Unforgiven...great movie, but I prefer the Spaghetti trilogy!

Sophies Choice. Wonderful A List movie.

Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit Have to look that one up??!! Dave is another one that I do not know.

Tue Mar 07, 2006 7:46 am

Cryo- I loved "13 Days" but the Cuban Missile crisis certainly does get enough play in the US. I know it by heart.

Genesim- You thought the ending of "AI" was too feel good? I thought it was somewhat muted and a little unsettling.

Have you noticed the similarities between "Good Will Hunting" and "Wild in the Country"? Might be an interesting double feature sometime.

Tue Mar 07, 2006 10:17 am

Hey Geno, have you seen In The Mood For Love by Wong Kar-Wai? Now that is a truly beautiful movie. You'll love it. Unfortunately I don't know how to post pictures but I don't think I've ever seen a movie look better than this one. It is a work of art, shot by genius / madman Christopher Doyle, and the script is fantastic, too.

Look at this picture and you'll get the idea:

http://www.lovehkfilm.com/reviews/in_th ... r_love.htm

Keith Richards, Jr.

Tue Mar 07, 2006 3:29 pm

13 Days - great film - own the DVD. Change of pace for Kevin Costner. Steven Culp plays RFK. He was also on the cast of "JAG" and "Desperate Housewives" and had a cameo role on my favorite show "The West Wing". I am a sucker for political thrillers. Any recommendations welcome.

A.I. - wonderful - the ending made me cry, was a combination of the music, the emotions and that I really came to like the robot kid.

Wallace and Gromit: Can't go wrong with those guys. Witty, clever, good-natured excellence all around, and a breath of fresh air after all the frenetic talking animals and pop-culture referencing of the Disney and Dreamworks. I was glad to see that clay animation won the Oscar this year. There is a certain charm that is not possible with CG animation

Any film with Clint Eastwood is entertaining. He da man! I even enjoyed the films with Sondra Locke, Bronko Billy etc. Or "Play Misty For Me".

"True Romance" gets better every time.

Tue Mar 07, 2006 6:48 pm

Obvious...
The Virgin Suicides :lol:

Wed Mar 08, 2006 10:08 am

likethebike wrote:Cryo- I loved "13 Days" but the Cuban Missile crisis certainly does get enough play in the US. I know it by heart.


Then it must be relatively unknown in almost every country but the US. It doesn't get talked about here in the UK. Though my dad is politically aware and fully understands its importance.

Genesim- You thought the ending of "AI" was too feel good? I thought it was somewhat muted and a little unsettling.


Agreed. I think Spielberg uses his love for sentimentality in a very technical sense here. He doesn't apply it to artificially elicit an added emotional response from the audience (something he couldn't even resist in "Schindler's List", believe it or not). The ending of "A.I." isn't just emotion for emotion's sake; it's a part of the film's rigorous thematic tapestry. The whole film is slightly off-kilter and emotionally/intellectually perturbing. I honestly think he did Kubrick proud. If you can get through this article (it's long and philosophical), I think you'll see the film in a new light:

http://www.brightlightsfilm.com/48/ai.htm

Have you noticed the similarities between "Good Will Hunting" and "Wild in the Country"? Might be an interesting double feature sometime.


I'll have to bear this in mind when I finally get around to seeing "Wild In The Country". The best Elvis film I've seen remains "Flaming Star". Mr Simmons... I hope you've seen that! Elvis + Don Siegel = Clint Elviswood (or... something).

Another really touching film, and another mini classic all by itself, is A Bronx Tale. Unlike "Goodfellas" and "Casino", which might ostensibly be called "superior" films, "A Bronx Tale" is a film with gangsters that wears its morality on its sleeve - but that's not a bad thing. The film is a wonderful "coming of age" tale and has that father/son mentor/student thing going on that Star Wars does so well. It was DeNiro's directorial debut, and going on the stellar soundtrack alone, it's obvious he learnt well from Jedi Master Scorsese. This is absolutely worth your time.

Have you also seen the great Western of the 1990's? Put "Dances With Wolves" aside (superb though that is). Put "Unforgiven" aside (superb though that is). I'm talking the one and only here - Tombstone. The quality of acting in this film, especially from Kurt Russel and Val Kilmer, is terrific (not that Kurt or Val are ever anything less than brilliant). And no one can possibly miss a film with a line like, "Are you going to do something or just stand there and bleed?".

Wed Mar 08, 2006 10:20 am

wow. i like a total of one film mentioned here (besides sw).

yes. i also ditto on tombstone. brilliant movie. awesome historical town in arizona (been there!). it's the story of wyatt earp, the earp brothers and doc holliday.

and wild in the country is SERIOUSLY underrated.

Wed Mar 08, 2006 10:34 am

I like "Bronx Tale" because of the way it recreates the New York of the '50s and '60s. The father/son/gangster angle is good as well.

"Goodfellas" might be the best movie of the 1990s. To use Elvis' Babe's criteria of "real world" response, it is certainly the movie that resonates the deepest with the people that I know personally. It's definitely a great movie though as far from "Lost in Translation" as you can find.

"Casino" to me is over the top almost to the point of self-parody. The violence has just become repuslive and gratuitious at this point.

I agree about the off-kilter aspect of "AI" but the intense mother-love is very Spielberg.

It makes sense that missile crisis plays bigger in the US since we were directly involved. A big problem with the movie for me was an overfamiliarity with the event.

Wed Mar 08, 2006 10:56 am

likethebike wrote:"Goodfellas" might be the best movie of the 1990s. To use Elvis' Babe's criteria of "real world" response, it is certainly the movie that resonates the deepest with the people that I know personally. It's definitely a great movie though as far from "Lost in Translation" as you can find.


It's one of the greatest movies from the 90's - no question. Another one is unquestionably "Pulp Fiction".

Casino" to me is over the top almost to the point of self-parody. The violence has just become repuslive and gratuitious at this point.


The "pen" incident at the start of the film feels alarmingly derivative of the infamous revenge that Pesci's character enacts in "Goodfellas". In fact, the entire character looks and acts the same! Having DeNiro there just completes the feel (though DeNiro's character is more complex in "Casino"). I think "Casino" has justified itself once the end credits roll, however. It's like a companion piece to "Goodfellas", and in some ways, is the more accomplished (if less fresh) film. The violence at the end of the film, though, is exactly as you say. No other film has ever got under my skin like that. It's sickening. I'm still trying to work out if it was entirely necessary or not. It's so hard for me to think intellectually about that scene; it's so shockingly brutal.

I agree about the off-kilter aspect of "AI" but the intense mother-love is very Spielberg.


How so? David's quest to be loved and the attachment he develops with his mother does tug on the heartstrings - but there's something very dark about it. Check the linked-to article out. David's quest for love and all that that entails is OUR quest for love; there are some disturbing implications.

It makes sense that missile crisis plays bigger in the US since we were directly involved. A big problem with the movie for me was an overfamiliarity with the event.


I can well imagine how tepid the film must be for you. It hooked me because I knew virtually nothing, but on further viewings, it dragged a little. I guess genesim can leave that one if he wants (though Melanie likes it). It's definitely one you have to be prepared to stick with.

Another one is, hold your breath... The Muppet Christmas Carol. The Henson Company was at the top of its game back then (though Jim Henson had died two years previously - God rest his soul). This is a really sumptuous production told with amazing elegance and compassion. There are some genuine wrenching moments of pathos in this adaptation, too - and Michael Caine gives the performance of his life. "When Love Is Gone" is a touching song (Elvis could have broken your heart with this one). But, of course, for all its darker parts, the ending is exactly as it needs to be: warm and resounding. This is a wonderful film to watch at Christmas time.
Last edited by Cryogenic on Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:00 am

i really liked the muppet christmas carol as a kid, too. :lol:

actually it was my favorite version of the christmas carol for a long time.

Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:03 am

See! I'm breaking you down, bit by bit, Elvis' Babe. :D

Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:34 am

I think it's a sign that Scorsese is such a good filmmaker that we have to ask if such extreme violence is necessary. Most of the time the answer is a flat "no". I know in "Goodfellas" it's certainly yes as the main underpoint of the movie is to demonstrate the kind of animals these guys were. Yet I'm amazed at how people blow some of it off. They see the Copa and the nightclubs and the women and the "good life" in prison. Yet they shrug off the terror in the children's eyes as the parent's fight, the wife wondering what happened to her husband seconds after we saw him killed, the mailman getting jammed into an oven, the boy waiter getting murdered for nothing, Ray Liotta's amazement that his best friend would kill him. Scorsese is clearly going past the cliche that they only murder each other. Although like in "The Godfather" we see the humanity in the characters, Scorsese makes clear that these are brutal evil men.

I don't get that as much from "Casino". The high pitched whine Pesci uses increases the parodic aspect.

It's not that I necessarily find "13 Days" tepid, it's that its thrill for me comes more from the overall message and a kind of a distant hero worship than it does from any suspense that comes from the overall events.

Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:40 am

yes, but there really isn't much elitist snobbery around viewers who like tombstone and the muppet xmas carol. :lol: those are pretty mainstream audience movies. nobody goes around calling them "high art" incessantly.

i saw the first chunk of pulp fiction...i ditched it during the bruce willis portion which was a little slow for my taste, but of course i loved travolta's dancing...the overdose scene was squicky, but i didn't mind it. i kind of got lost after the travolta/thurman scenes got a break though.