Off Topic Messages

Tue Feb 28, 2006 6:04 am

MauriceinIreland wrote: If you had a PBS TV SYTEM Like the BBC paid for by public subscription we all might get some far better programmes from the USA?


We do have PBS Maurice. As a matter of fact I frequently watch a charming little English show called May to December.

What fine programs from Ireland might I be looking for Maurice?

You know what never mind....

Tue Feb 28, 2006 6:12 am

likethebike wrote:Pete- You really think the citizens of the US could overthrow a despotic regime with some handguns, rifles and the loose automatic weapon?


I don't know Bike, but at least it gives us a fighting chance - banning guns wouldn't.

And if we learn anything from history it's that a guerilla army can defeat better equipped forces.

Tue Feb 28, 2006 6:37 am

likethebike wrote:The problem with your argument Pete and I know you're not a gun advocate is that it is so much easier to kill a person with a gun than through those other methods and it's much easier to kill someone accidentally with a gun as well. To poison someone you have to get them to swallow the poison. To stab someone you have to get up close to them to shoot people you don't have to do either of these. There are a lot arbitrary murders because of careless gun play than because of anything else.


Lizzie Borden killed her parents in their sleep with an ax. So getting close to them wasn't a problem, and we all gotta sleep sometime.
Yes it is easier to kill with a gun, but banning guns from law-abiding citizens will not keep them from criminals. Accidental deaths will occur, but promoting responsible gun ownership, which includes gun safety, can help to prevent accidents. People die in car accidents, but we don't ban cars? Or alcohol.

likethebike wrote:I'm a limited supporter of the Second Amendment. I don't have a problem with people owning shotguns and handguns and even some collectors owning some more serious hardware but you have to wonder why most people would want to own a murder machine like an automatic weapon. The purpose of the weapon is not only to kill people but to kill masses of people in a short amount of time. You also have to admit there's a problem when terrorists list the USA as a source for obtaining weapons.


Actually LTB, I'm for private citizens owning hunting rifles, shotguns, and handguns, but I have misgivings about the collectors owning 'serious hardware.' What is a collector? What distinguishes him from the average citizen that he can own the heavy duty stuff?

Tue Feb 28, 2006 7:31 am

Lizzie Borden killing her parents with an axe requires a little determination luck etc. A lot of people shoot people (and themselves) because they lose their head for one instant. It's just so much easier to kill with them and it requires so much less thinking. Too often guns make killers of otherwise law abiding people because of the ease they bring to killing. Think of the road rage shootings on the LA freeways a few years back. Now the people who did those shootings had some issues but easy gun access let them act much easier on their destructive impulses.

The reason we don't ban cars and alcohol is because they have a purpose outside of killing.

Pete- I share your misgivings. However, I do realize that just as there are people who find Medieval armory fascinating there are people intrigued by fire arms. Perhaps a more serious weapon could incpacitated leaving the basic structure intact but limiting its usefulness as a weapon. Those people that collect spears don't hold jousts in their backyards.

I am not against gun ownership however there has to be some sort of regulation because what we have right now is not working. What an effective balance is, I don't claim to know but both sides have to be willing and the gun lobby is effectively against any and all compromise. There are many reasonable compromises that they are totally against like mandatory background checks. It would be nice to know if someone buying weapon is a convicted felon or has a record of mental illness or even worse is currently under treatment. Between a seven and 30 day waiting period is also consistently opposed by the gun lobby. A waiting period will allow some people red hot with emotion to cool off. Some people won't but some people will.

Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:29 am

Blue-Gypsy wrote:
MauriceinIreland wrote: If you had a PBS TV SYTEM Like the BBC paid for by public subscription we all might get some far better programmes from the USA?


We do have PBS Maurice. As a matter of fact I frequently watch a charming little English show called May to December.

What fine programs from Ireland might I be looking for Maurice?

You know what never mind....


You might try our political question time debates:-)

Our dramas and cultural shows can be excellent for a small country. But it's our humour that really levels the pompous.

We are not as sensitive to criticism as Americans appear to be....at least around here :lol:

How did this thread get into Gun control or should I say the lack of it!

The arguements have been going on forever...............it's amazing how the vast majority of nations get along without their populations needing to arm themselves to the teeth.

Very strange by any reckoning.

Tue Feb 28, 2006 12:03 pm

The Charlton Heston thing is what got it off on gun control.

Tue Feb 28, 2006 4:58 pm

LTB -
For the record I'm all for gun control measures. Background checks, waiting periods, mandatory firearms safety training. I don't want anyone to be able to walk in off the street and get a gun. And I want those who do get them to own them responsibly. There are too many irresponsible yahoos and pseudo-tough guys out there packin'!

Tue Feb 28, 2006 5:36 pm

Pete Dube wrote:LTB -
For the record I'm all for gun control measures. Background checks, waiting periods, mandatory firearms safety training. I don't want anyone to be able to walk in off the street and get a gun. And I want those who do get them to own them responsibly. There are too many irresponsible yahoos and pseudo-tough guys out there packin'!


Exactly. And I've yet to hear a remotely reasonable argument against such measures.

Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:20 pm

The main argument that anti-gun control activists use is that it will be a domino effect that once you enact one law others will surely follow eventually eroding the right to bear arms to nothing.

One thing that needs to be explored is why this is an issue now. Guns weren't any tougher to get in the 1950s yet gun violence wasn't nearly as big of an issue.

Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:42 pm

likethebike wrote:One thing that needs to be explored is why this is an issue now. Guns weren't any tougher to get in the 1950s yet gun violence wasn't nearly as big of an issue.


Now there's an excellent point.

Ireland in the 1950s had the lowest crime rate in the world.

An age of Violence has arrived.

Once thugs were content to beat people up with their fists, then came knives, now guns are used, and the killings by gunfire increases by the year! In our case more often than not, drug and gang related.

A more violent generation in America appears to have easy access to guns despite the controls.

We view and read about all the drive-by shootings in the USA and they have spread to cities in the UK!

It appears the Founding fathers did not forsee such a descent into savagery on American streets? We didn't either.

Blue-Gypsy, When I mentioned PBS I meant a licence fee. The money is used to finance the excellent BBC Series:-).......and a lot of rubbish too:-(

We actually have a Licence fee here in Ireland (150 Euros per year) for our national Commercial TV with advertisements!

But we see the UK Channels free:-)

Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:06 am

Blue-Gypsy wrote:
MauriceinIreland wrote: If you had a PBS TV SYTEM Like the BBC paid for by public subscription we all might get some far better programmes from the USA?


We do have PBS Maurice. As a matter of fact I frequently watch a charming little English show called May to December.

What fine programs from Ireland might I be looking for Maurice?


I recommend "Taking The Piss" with Colin O'Flannery. A light situation comedy set in a local pub (naturally) where a group of characters such as Norm and Sam (a former pro Curler) discuss life and love. Be on the lookout for the hilarious mailman who drives the pub to distraction with his campaign to memorialize the entire population of the planet with bronze statuary.

Or the notable serial drama " Dublin", set on a sprawling sheep ranch (and pub) and starring such memorable characters as J.R. O'Ewing, Bobby O'Ewing, and Dolly Ewe(ing) the cloned (and very nervous) sheep.

Let's not forget the great programs such as "Irish Biography", where such Irish entertainment icons as Sean Connery and Collin Farrell are featured in movie clips and interviews (in a pub). That's all they have so far.........they're waiting for more Irish celebrities to emerge.

Or how about "Seinn Fein Feld", the wacky comedy about the life of a stand-up comic (who performs in pubs) named Jerry who is secretly a nationalistic terrorist. An explosive good time.

Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:16 am

Scatter, Now you have really asked for it.

Later.......an education :lol:

Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:20 am

MauriceinIreland wrote:Scatter, Now you have really asked for it.

Later.......an education :lol:


I know.........I'm incorrigible :lol:

Wed Mar 01, 2006 4:46 pm

Connery is a Scot Scat.

Wed Mar 01, 2006 9:22 pm

Pete Dube, and Connery can get an Irish Passport because his father was Irish. Dual citizenship if he wants.

And to confuse people further the ancient Scots were Irish :lol:

"There are two Dalriadas: that of northwest Ireland, and that of western Scotland.

Dalridia is the Gaelic kingdom that, at least from the 5th century AD, extended on both sides of the North Channel and composed the northern part of the present County Antrim, Northern Ireland, and part of the Inner Hebrides and Argyll, in Scotland.

In earlier times, Argyll had received extensive immigration from the Irish of Northern Ireland (known as "Scoti"), and had become an Irish (i.e., "Scottish") area. In the latter half of the 5th century, the ruling family of Irish Dalriada crossed into Scottish Dalriada and made Dunadd and Dunolly its chief strongholds. Irish Dalriada gradually declined; and after the Viking invasions early in the 9th century, it lost all political identity.

The political history of the Dalriada in Britain is traced from the time of Fergus Mor (d. 501), who moved the seat of the royal dynasty of Dalriada
from Ireland to northern Britain. Scottish Dalriada was confined to the western coast of modern Scotland, including Arran, Jura, Islay, Mull, and
numerous other smaller islands, with its seat at Dunadd in Argyll. From 574 to 606/8, Dalriada was ruled by one of its most dynamic and successful kings, Aedan mac Gabran.

Despite heavy onslaughts from the Picts, the Dalriada of the Scottish mainland continued to expand. In the mid-9th century its king Kenneth I MacAlpin brought the Picts permanently under Dalriadic rule, and thereafter the whole country was known as Scotland.


Knowledge of the early Scottish kings, until Malcolm II, is primarily legendary.


Kenneth 1

Also called KENNETH MACALPIN (d. c. 858, Forteviot, Scot.).

MacAlpin was considered the first king of the united Scots of Dalriada and the Picts, and so of Scotland north of a line between the Forth and Clyde rivers. Ancient Gaelic-speaking people of northern Ireland who settled in Scotland sometime in the 5th century AD. Originally (until the 10th
century) "Scotia" denoted Ireland, and the inhabitants of Scotia were Scotti. "

Thu Mar 02, 2006 12:20 am

MauriceinIreland wrote:Pete Dube, and Connery can get an Irish Passport because his father was Irish. Dual citizenship if he wants.


He don't want. He's a proud Scot!


MauriceinIreland wrote:And to confuse people further the ancient Scots were Irish :lol:


In that case I'll expect to drink for free at your brother's pub, seeing as my mother's maiden name is MacDonald.

MauriceinIreland wrote:Originally (until the 10th
century) "Scotia" denoted Ireland, and the inhabitants of Scotia were Scotti. "


No no. Scotti was the chief engineering officer on the starship Enterprise.

Thu Mar 02, 2006 12:38 am

Free drink, and no pressure to tip everyone :lol: The hidden cost of holidays in the USA.

Sean's Irish Genes shine through.

He has a webpage did you know?

Thu Mar 02, 2006 11:53 pm

MauriceinIreland wrote:
Sean's Irish Genes shine through.


I'm pretty sure there's an ointment for that :wink:

Fri Mar 03, 2006 1:35 am

Clooney rocks -- and the girls roll.

DJC

Fri Mar 03, 2006 10:32 pm

We went to see George Clooney in "Syriana" today.

Enjoyed the movie. An eye-opener for some. But we already knew the story of Oil from an excellent indepth TV Documentary series years ago.

And reading Rockerfeller etc, biographies.

Now China's thirst for oil complicates the equation.

George Clooney an American. Oscar Winner:-)

Mon Mar 06, 2006 12:45 pm

Well Done George :lol: Keep being THAT out of touch.

Mon Mar 06, 2006 5:54 pm

George Clooney at the Oscars last night:

"I'm proud to be 'out of step' with America."


I know what he was trying to say in reference to Hollywood historic stands for the underdog (movies about racism, unionism, etc.) but some of this surely comes off as typical Hollywood self-congratulatory arrogance.

Oh, mainstream America is just so backward and in need of Hollywood's point of view.

Thanks for the advice. :roll: Don't take that as an endorsement of the GOP or President Bush, but this type of stand reeks of the elitism that makes the Republicans win time and again.

Mon Mar 06, 2006 9:45 pm

Greg, I listened attentively to George Clooney speaking on quite a few TV chat shows recently and did not pick up any conceit or arrogance.

Of course I do not see any MAJOR difference between American political parties. When it comes to the nitty gritty they both rally around the flag.

After leaving Ireland in 1949 aged 7. I grew up in a foreign country, my strange accent a target for mocking bullies. But they soon learnt I was better fed than they were (Wartime food rationing had taken it's toll on children in England.) ) and far fitter :lol:

The stoneage thinkers around here need a little instruction in the history of shifting populations.

Colonialists complaints are quite entertaining.

Mon Mar 06, 2006 10:11 pm

No, he's not really conceited. Although one can find some conceit in his remarks about the industry he is "so proud to be a part of."

I was speaking more generally at the charges leveled at Hollywood. He's one of the more outspoken ones - but to his credit, tends to do it with a glint in his eye and a willingness to engage his critics, like US TV host Bill O'Reilly.

Our two parties are extremely close in some ways, most of all economics and foregn policy, in the big scheme of things.

It's a pity that the 2-party system is so entrenched. At least in Europe, any party worth its salt can came come to power. Here, the issue has to be absorbed by one party or the other - and usually is changed as a result. In the end, many Democrats and Republicans can only be told by those keeping score at home.

Mon Mar 06, 2006 10:39 pm

I'm pretty much up to speed on the generalities of American politics which get quite a lot of coverage in our broadsheets, TV and Radio discussions.

I read a lot of books too :wink:

Although of late I despair of the crowd we have on both sides of the Atlantic. And the Irish sea.

It seems business will eventually cancel out politics anyway. The Market rules! China may change the whole world.

What would Mao Tse :lol: