Off Topic Messages

Wilson Pickett has passed away

Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:29 am

RESTON, Va. - Wilson Pickett, the soul pioneer best known for the fiery hits "Mustang Sally" and "In The Midnight Hour," died of a heart attack Thursday, according to his management company. He was 64.

Chris Tuthill of the management company Talent Source said Pickett had been suffering from health problems for the past year.

A member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Pickett — known as the "Wicked Pickett" — became a star with his soulful hits in the 1960s.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060119/ap_ ... _pickett_2

:cry:
Last edited by Claus on Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:35 am, edited 1 time in total.

Fri Jan 20, 2006 1:34 am

Very sad news. The guy really had a lot of soul and could really scream.
One of the best from the great 60's soul music.

jeff R

Fri Jan 20, 2006 2:00 am

I was very sorry to just learn this.

His Atlantic sides (years after the fact) really got to me in the '80s, especially the ballad "I'm in Love."

R.I.P.
Image

the Wicked Pickett

Fri Jan 20, 2006 2:55 am

My favorite soul singer of the 60's. A great voice full of soul and he could scream like no one! Of course, it didn't hurt having Booker T & the MG's backing him up! Got to see him in person just once, summer of 2004, very disappointing. He may have been in ill health even then. Spent half the show just sitting down on a chair in the wings, the backup group had to do all the work. He sang a few of the classics - In the Midnight Hour, Mustang Sally, Land of 1000 Dances - but left out many more - Funky Broadway, I'm a Midnight Mover, Night Owl, sang other folks' hits instead. The show was over before it began.

Re: the Wicked Pickett

Fri Jan 20, 2006 3:49 am

Lonely Summer wrote:My favorite soul singer of the 60's. A great voice full of soul and he could scream like no one! Of course, it didn't hurt having Booker T & the MG's backing him up! Got to see him in person just once, summer of 2004, very disappointing. He may have been in ill health even then. Spent half the show just sitting down on a chair in the wings, the backup group had to do all the work. He sang a few of the classics - In the Midnight Hour, Mustang Sally, Land of 1000 Dances - but left out many more - Funky Broadway, I'm a Midnight Mover, Night Owl, sang other folks' hits instead. The show was over before it began.


Wilson Pickett has just passed away and you just had to make a point how dissappointed you was when you saw him in concert,obviously because he was ill.
I think some respect is in order and there is just no need to mention that show. :roll:
R.I.P. Wilson Pickett and thanks for the music you left behind.

Fri Jan 20, 2006 4:43 am

I agree Sean. The music he left the world deserves thanks.

He was a truly unique performer and one of the pioneers of southern '60s soul first with the Falcons and then on his own. Unlike many Motown performers, brilliant as they were, there was no compromise in this man's sound. It was deep, it was black, it was southern and it was hard edged. Some of his best stuff came when he hooked up with Bobby Womack and added a layer of introspection to his sound particularly on the great "I'm in Love" album one of the all-time classics of southern soul highlighted by the title track and the stunning "Jealous Love". Even after leaving Atlantic he still continued to push the envelope with tracks like "Lay me Like You Hate Me". In the 1990s, he even made a very interesting comeback album in "It's Harder Now" which although it had some deficiencies in material and production saw Pickett's voice reserved remarkably well.

Only in his mid-60s, it's a crying shame to see him go because he contributed so much. His stature amongst soul aficionados can be gauged in the film "The Commitments" where the biggest thing that can happen to this band is to be heard by Wilson Pickett even though he had not had a hit in years. He was just it.

Goodbye Wicked One. Rest in peace.

Fri Jan 20, 2006 6:31 am

Another pioneer gone. Sad news indeed, but at the very least, we still have his music. You cannot walk in to a club around here and sit for very long without hearing the band play Mustang Sally.

Fri Jan 20, 2006 12:32 pm

Oh nooooooooooo!!

Sad news! :cry: :cry:

R.I.P. Wilson

Fri Jan 20, 2006 4:35 pm

Sad news. Wilson Pickett was a terrific soul singer! (My favorite after Otis.)His version of Hey Jude is incredible. So many memorable recordings: In The Midnight Hour; Mustang Sally; Land of a Thousand Dances; 634-5789; Don't Let The Green Grass Fool You. They just don't make 'em like that anymore. Thank you Wilson Pickett for the great music. RIP.

Re: the Wicked Pickett

Fri Jan 20, 2006 5:18 pm

Lonely Summer wrote:He sang a few of the classics - In the Midnight Hour, Mustang Sally, Land of 1000 Dances - but left out many more - Funky Broadway, I'm a Midnight Mover, Night Owl, sang other folks' hits instead.


Unfortunately most people want and expect the old soul legends to sing nothing but overfamiliar hits like "Stand By Me". I remember when Solomon Burke visited Sweden after his comeback album "Don't Give Up On Me". He thought everybody wanted to hear those old classics but the audience was mostly made up of younger music fanatics who wanted to hear his new songs (and some of the old ones, of course). So the first night was very disappointing for all involved. But then the tour manager explained to Burke that his new album is, in fact, very popular over here and this audience is not that interested in "Stand By Me" and medleys. Burke then rearranged his entire show and gave three OUTSTANDING shows before he left the country. I catched the last one and it's still one of the best concerts I have ever seen. Burke seemed to be very happy about this situation, too. He looked real proud, happy and inspired.

Soul and country legends deserve to be treated much better than they are. They do not deserve to be treated like irrelevant nostalgia acts. Loretta Lynn's comeback album - produced by Jack White of The White Stripes - is fantastic and I'm sure many other legends could do just as good if given the chance. A guy like George Jones is still one of the very finest singers alive, for example.

I'm sorry to hear about Pickett's passing. No one could scream and shout like The Wicked Pickett! My favourite songs are "Stagger Lee" and "Don't Let the Green Grass Fool You".

R.I.P.

Keith Richards, Jr.

Fri Jan 20, 2006 6:18 pm

Interesting story, Keith. Im glad that happened that way for Solomon Burke. I had noticed he seemed especially "on" and truly "into it" even in print interviews.

I'm enjoying how a guy like Rick Rubin has helped produce comebacks for "oldies" acts like Johnny Cash and Neil Diamond, or that, say, that White Stripe-produced Lorretta Lynn album.

I'm glad Pickett got good notices on that last "comeback" album, despite a few quibbles. It wouldn't surprise me if he done some of those new songs in that show someone mentioned and then got a so-so response or "why is he singing someone else's songs?"

The handling of one's old hits is a classic dillema that even Elvis, as we know faced. Fans had to have those big '50s hits twenty years later but he also seemed hemmed in by them.

Even Jim Hendrix, who died at 27, was apparently in a funk over fans who insisted on "Purple Haze" every time he played live even though he had truly moved on.

Ah, fame... :D

Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:20 pm

Here's a nice obit by Piers from his down under site, drawing connections to Elvis...

Wilson Pickett & Elvis
- Soul Legend Obituary -


by Piers Beagley

Wilson Pickett, born in Prattville, Alabama on March 18th 1941, died January 18th 2006 of a heart attack.

One of the greatest souls singers of all-time, there may seem to be little connection with Elvis Presley.

However at the peak of his success in the mid-sixties the "Wicked Pickett" caused similar controversy to Middle-America as Elvis had done in the fifties. Not only that but Wilson Pickett perfected his soul-style only after relocating to Memphis.


Wilson Pickett's classic ‘In The Midnight Hour’ was cut in Memphis’ Stax Studios and in 1967 Pickett had a very fruitful relationship with Chips Moman at ‘American Studios’ two years before Elvis’ dynamic ‘Suspicious Minds’ sessions.

Quoting writer Kevin Phinney. .
"When Wilson Pickett's ‘In The Midnight Hour’ hit the charts in June 1965, rock 'n' roll was little more than a decade old. Worried parents continued to hope the furore would prove a passing tad, while fearmongers publicly decried the corrupting influence of "jungle music" from podiums and pulpits around the country.

"The Wicked Pickett" was the personification of many adults' worst nightmares, and ‘In The Midnight Hour’ made real their most secret dread. Threats to conventional morality were manifold. For starters, Wilson Pickett was one of the handsomest men ever to clutch a microphone. Worse, he was suave, debonair. Compared to tile competition in his native America, those letter-sweaterclad lads barely out of their teens, Pickett was easy to spot - a Lothario among; a gaggle of Andy Hardys whose voices hadn't finished changing."

Considering that by 1965 the once dangerous Elvis was well into his stream of "family-safe" sixties travelogue movies, this made Wilson Pickett even more threatening. It wouldn’t be until 1968 that Elvis would don the leather—suit to reclaim his power & prestige.

Listening to Pickett’s American Studio’s ‘I’m In Love’ you can hear the loving ache similar to Elvis’ ‘Long Black Limousine’ or ‘Only the Strong Survive’. Of course that "soulful sound" & that Memphis Horns funk have the same inspirational groove since both singers recorded with the same American Studio band.

In fact Elvis’ ‘Only The Strong Survive’ was composed by Gamble & Huff who also wrote & produced some of Pickett’s greatest songs.

Pickett’s vocal delivery of the gritty soulful-rasp is also similar to Elvis’ American Studios vocals, where an on-coming bout of laryngitis caused Elvis to record an astoundingly gritty session of soulful tracks in January 1969. Comparing Elvis’ ‘Wearin’ That Loved On Look’ or ‘Long Black Limousine’ with anything Pickett recorded in the same period shows that the pair could have easily teamed up to form a duo to outdo the formidable "Sam & Dave" (‘Soul Man’ etc). Now just imagine that live on stage!?

While ‘Mustang Sally’, ‘In the Midnight Hour’ plus ‘Land Of 1000 Dances’ are Pickett’s seminal work Elvis fans should also check out Pickett’s stunning version of The Beatles ‘Hey Jude’. Recorded at American Studios in 1968 Pickett’s version of 'Hey Jude' went Top Twenty in the charts. The similarity in arrangement & even vocal styles shows what Elvis was striving for - had anybody bothered to get Elvis the proper lyrics in time and given more time for the band to work out the final arrangement. Elvis’ half-finished version was scrapped, only to be released on the contract filler ‘Elvis Now’ in 1972.

Pickett experienced a career renaissance in 1991 with the release of the film ‘The Commitments’, which revolved around an Irish band that idolised him. Pickett was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in the same year. His Grammy-nominated last album, 'It's Harder Now', was released in 1999.


Wilson Pickett was one of the world's greatest singers and was still one of the funkiest live performers. Long-Live the "Wicked Pickett".


Below is a short list of Wilson Pickett’s best songs.

In The Midnight Hour
Land Of 1000 Dances
Mustang Sally
I'm In Love
Hey Jude
634-5789
Ninety-Nine And One-Half (Won't Do)
I Found A Love
Everybody Needs Somebody To Love
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Sat Jan 21, 2006 12:39 am, edited 2 times in total.

Sat Jan 21, 2006 12:22 am

Pete Dube wrote:Sad news. Wilson Pickett was a terrific soul singer! (My favorite after Otis.)His version of Hey Jude is incredible. So many memorable recordings: In The Midnight Hour; Mustang Sally; Land of a Thousand Dances; 634-5789; Don't Let The Green Grass Fool You. They just don't make 'em like that anymore. Thank you Wilson Pickett for the great music. RIP.


Yep, his version of 'Hey Jude' far outclasses the original in every way. A gospel/soul/rock mixture with very early work from Duane Allman.

Sat Jan 21, 2006 12:35 am

actually, i have to admit the first time i heard of wilson pickett was in "the blues brothers" in a quick comment by john belushi right after they finish their cover of "everybody needs somebody to love"...

so yeah, that's the song i know of wilson pickett from.

Sat Jan 21, 2006 3:29 am

This is a terrible thing to say but....(i thought he was dead already a long time ago)... I like his music what I have heard. RIP

JEFF d
Elvis fan

Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:57 pm

Sad news....

Was always a Wilson Pickett fan - Dad used to play him a lot, when I was growing up.

He had a great voice, and a lotta soul.

Rich