Off Topic Messages

Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:11 pm

Graceland Gardener wrote:I think that Fats, and Little Richard, and Bo Diddley are in actuality,
envious and jealous of those young rap/hip-hop millionaires,
and resent their generation's ease of success and money-making.

But as old-timers, conveniently blame it on Elvis and "whitey" in general.


There may be some of that, Gardy, but the bigger thing about
the Hip Hop generation is how rich and even "legendary"
that they can get with zero real talent. There's a whole lot
of swagger and "'tude" and repititive bass beats, but really, how disposable most of it is...
Image
Yeah, I know it's all subjective, but c'mon. These rappers
don't even play instruments nor carry a tune.

Guys like Berry, Domino, Richard, etc. are musicians arguably first
of all. It's nice to have 'paved' the way to have white kids shell out
for your music and make later generations rich, but you know
they wish they could be actually worthy of jamming with. Or, in
the case of Doo Wop groups (another key part of rock'n'roll, to sing
and harmonize with..

Outside of being black, they might as well be space aliens in terms of
musical heritage. I don't consider it progress.
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:15 pm

yes, the old-timer R&B artist DO have talent. i agree.
I happen to love Howlin' Wolf.

and yes, today's hip hop is no-talent street urchin thugs in $200 tennisshoes.

- so there, compound the resentment that so many are millionaires
while the "legends" struggle to pay bills and medicare in their old age.

But, Elvis is not the problem.
But his name keeps cropping up in these reports.

Thu Oct 27, 2005 10:17 pm

Even if he was, the ridicule and scorn since '77
(am I overstating it?) has more than
paid up for his "sins."

I look forward to the open season on the Beatles, rap, etc.

People love to bash Elvis.

It's like taking on Oxygen.

Damned oxygen! :lol:

Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:10 pm

ColinB wrote:To me, there is a world of difference between covering a song a few months or years later and rushing out a cover version to compete with the original in the current singles chart !

Pat Boone and some others did the rushed covers with 'black' hits a lot.

Elvis didn't, but he has been 'tarred with the same brush'.

Not to mention how Boone 'sanitised' the songs; tore the guts out of them and presented them as rock 'n' roll with the danger removed.

Nice, acceptable records for white teenagers to buy.

Rock 'n' roll with the rock 'n' roll removed, more like.


You hit a bullseye Colin!

Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:30 pm

Pete -

You wrote:
You hit a bullseye Colin!


Thanks !

And not for the first time, either !
Last edited by ColinB on Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:30 pm

Actually the original idea of cover songs was to capitalize on and eclipse another artist's rising chart record. That's why they called them covers. Of course nowadays it merely refers to an artist or band doing another artist's or band's material.

Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:34 pm

ColinB wrote:Pete -

You wrote:
You hit a bullseye Colin!


Thanks !

And not for the first time, either !


Nope. Nor will it be the last. But even Stevie Wonder can hit the bullseye on a dart board now & again if given enough throws! :wink: :)

Thu Oct 27, 2005 11:48 pm

Getting back to the theme - or at least on a related note- it's
occurred to me that, sadly, today's music arguably re-segregating.

They say white kids are buying all the hip hop so maybe youth
are coming together, but the audience as a whole (by age, demographic,
etc.) is "splintered."

The notion of a real "Top 10" that might have a Frank Sinatra single,
a Doors hit, or Elvis or a Dionne Warwick or the Jackson Five or Neil Diamond etc. is just gone.

It seemed more unified then compared to now, the era of
Mariah Carey's phoney "number one hit singles" that barely anyone
knows about.
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Fri Oct 28, 2005 6:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Fri Oct 28, 2005 3:09 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:Getting back to the theme - or at least on a related note- it's occurred to me that, sadly, today's music arguably re-segregating.

An article I read earlier today made that same point about late 60s rock:

"The 1950s and early 1960s produced acts like Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and the Supremes that brought audiences together not only across racial lines but regional and class barriers as well. The rock of the late 1960s was the product of a dramatically resegregated environment. The deaths of Hendrix and Otis Redding left Sly Stone as the only black superstar in rock music, who ultimately despaired at the seeming impossibility of an integrated society."

Eileen

Sun Oct 30, 2005 2:47 am

The younger generation are being thrown away in hip hop songs and the other ****$ style.....

If they could have the chance to know how good the songs and bands were 30, 40, 50 years ago! :cry: