Off Topic Messages

CD-r QUESTIONS

Fri Sep 23, 2005 8:55 pm

Will a Cdr deteriorate with time?

How can do tell the difference between a Cd and a Cdr. Is it as simple as a Cdr's underside is blue, or at least not something you can use as a mirror (as my sister has been known to do!)

I'm just a little concerned that some, ahem, imports I've bought in the past might not be proper Cds and I paid full whack for them to a respected figure.

Thanks.

Fri Sep 23, 2005 9:51 pm

There is no difference with sound. But they are more fragile than regular CDs. So you should have at least one safety copy.
Last edited by Juan Luis on Sun Sep 25, 2005 7:15 am, edited 1 time in total.

Fri Sep 23, 2005 11:58 pm

Yes the blue..black.....purple...red...white.. color is the indicator. The main thing is it isn't the silver hue! :lol:

As for the quality. If done correctly. Identical.

As for longetivity. It will last just as long as a regular cd if handled correctly. Heat can hurt a cd, but I don't think this is any different for a cdr then it is for a regular glass master cd. Except for the fact that the chemicals could be degraded and thus making the cd's useless.

Either the information is there..or not. Most of the time scratches are going to be the real reason it skips or what not.

As it stands, don't worry about it. The information will almost always be out there if it ever made it to cd. Thank goodness for the digital age where we have perfectly preserved images.

Sun Sep 25, 2005 2:31 am

genesim wrote:

As for longetivity. It will last just as long as a regular cd if handled correctly. Heat can hurt a cd, but I don't think this is any different for a cdr then it is for a regular glass master cd. Except for the fact that the chemicals could be degraded and thus making the cd's useless.



I have read it somewhere, but I can't remember it anymore:

What is the temperature range CDs is recommended being stored at?
Minimum and maximum?

Br
Kristian

Sun Sep 25, 2005 4:48 pm

I got this from a google for Kodak CDR, but to be honest I am sure there are certain variables. Different inks..different plastics. Everything isn't uniform when comparing cd to cd.

We do not have data to answer your question directly. Kodak's standard accelerated ageing condition is 80 degrees Celsius, 85% Relative Humidity. Kodak Ultima media typically survives a number of weeks at that condition. Limited testing has been done at higher temperatures. This testing suggests that one hour at 100 degrees Celsius should not present a problem. Certainly any temperature at or near 120 degrees Celsius would. CD-R substrates are molded from polycarbonate. The glass transition temperature for polycarbonate is approximately 140 degrees Celsius. If the temperature gets within 20 degrees Celsius of the glass transition temperature, there is a likelihood of significant disc deformation.


To me cold isn't very relative unless it is so much as to crack the cd.

Wed Sep 28, 2005 3:43 pm

Thanks, chaps.

You've put my mind at rest. :D

Wed Sep 28, 2005 10:42 pm

Just stay away from those super-thin ones that were available for a time.

Out of respect to Elvis (real or CDR versions), I never (well, almost never)
leave my discs in the car (or inside the player) during the warm part of
the year. I don't want to test fate... :shock:

Wed Sep 28, 2005 11:34 pm

Greg -

You wrote:
I don't want to test fate...


Or tempt her even.....................

Wed Sep 28, 2005 11:58 pm

So it's a "she"?

That bitch...! :lol:

Thu Sep 29, 2005 12:40 am

Greg -

Well, they say "Luck, be a lady tonight !", don't they ?

Oh, we were talking about fate, weren't we !

D'oh !