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The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 1:59 am

In the May of 1955 Fred Foster almost beat RCA to the punch, almost had a hand in signing Elvis Presley away from Sam Phillips before RCA did, well, almost. Starting in the music business by penning lyrics on the side of his regular job (working for a restaurant chain), Foster would go on to become a promo man first with Mercury Records and later with ABC. Fred Foster knew a good thing when he heard it, and he heard it in a young fella by the name of Elvis Presley:


A Poor Carolina Boy With An Ear For Talent

Foster grew up in North Carolina on his parents’ farm. He left for Washington D.C. at age 17 to make something of himself in the booming recording industry. And in 1953, he found a job working for Mercury Records in distribution and promotion, eventually rising to be head of country promotion.

Even at a young age, Foster knew what a hit record sounded like. In fact, he almost ushered in the biggest signing in music history. One day while driving, Foster heard a then unknown Elvis Presley’s song “I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone” on the radio. He immediately pulled over and then headed to the radio station to ask the DJ who it was.

He called Mercury marketing director Art Talmadge and pleaded with him to buy Presley’s contract. Talmadge didn’t quite hear what all the fuss was about (he even asked, “What kind of a name is that?”), but he went with an offer for the contract. Fosters says Talmadge then called him a few days later saying there’s no way he’d pay what businessman Sam Phillips wanted — $50,000. Talmadge’s highest offer was $35,000.

“I said, ‘Art, you can give him $500,000, it won’t matter, you’ll make it back on the first record,'” Foster says. “He said, ‘You’re insane.’ I said, ‘Possibly, never had to debate that, but I know what I’m telling you.'”

Talmadge never went above $35,000. Elvis’ contract went to RCA for $40,000, and the rest is history. Oh, and Mercury definitely would’ve made that money back on the first record.

http://www.wideopencountry.com/fred-fos ... ic-better/


I shall digress for a moment, to allow the ink to dry. Fast forward a few years and in 1966 the same Art Talmadge, by then the controlling partner of Musicor Records (he and George Jones' producer, Harold "Pappy" Daily, had bought stock from Aaron Schroeder, the same Aaron Schroeder who wrote songs for Elvis Presley and a few others), would follow up the release of two albums of country duets by George Jones and Gene Pitney, with a solo album The Country Side Of Gene Pitney. On that album, with deft touch and a more restrained approach than on his pop records, Pitney covered his duet partner's hit-record from a few years earlier, "She Thinks I Still Care". Perhaps, in 1966, Elvis heard Gene's record, whatever, ten years later, and the two versions of "She Thinks I Still Care" cut by Elvis, could sit quite comfortably either side of Pitney's version:






Back to Fred Foster, in 1958 he launched Monument Records, and with no studio of his own at the time, he hired space at RCA in Nashville, which he would use on a regular basis thru to and including 1964. Monument's most impacting artist and perhaps Fred Foster's most impacting 'creation' was the "Big O". Monument put Roy Orbison on the map, Orbison returned the favour, and with the exception of "It's Over", "Pretty Paper" and his biggest record "Oh, Pretty Woman" (written with, and featuring the uncredited harmony-vocal of, Bill Dees), pretty much all of the Big O's major Monument records were recorded at RCA.


So, a question. How do you solve a problem like Roy Orbison? Try as he might, Sam Phillips couldn't figure it, neither could Chet Atkins, but maverick producer and owner of Monument Records, Fred Foster, solved it with a coat rack! Sam Phillips had told Roy "You can't sing! I had to cram the microphone down your throat just to pick you up, your voice is so weak!". Shortly thereafter, Roy would leave Sun and after a brief stopover at RCA, find his way to Fred Foster and Monument. Orbison’s second (RCA Studio B) Monument session marked a change in the way Foster recorded Orbison. Foster told the story in the notes to the Orbison career-spanning boxset “The Soul Of Rock And Roll”:


I visualized using the great tenor saxman Boots Randolph to supply the pivotal background fills ("Uptown"). Roy asked to use a string section for a greater ‘uptown emphasis.’ This proved to be problematic. We were in Nashville, where you could find plenty of fiddle players but hardly any violin players. Anita Kerr (leader of the backup Anita Kerr Singers) did find four violin players, and she arranged their parts so they sounded like the string section Roy had asked for."



Fred Foster put Roy together with singer-songwriter Joe Melson, and together they penned "Only The Lonely" and it was on that song, originally intended for Elvis, that the remarkable metamorphosis Roy would undergo was fully realised, leaving behind Sun's squeaky-voiced twitterer and emerging as Monument's majestic "Big O". "Only The Lonely" was recorded at Roy's third (Studio B) Monument session, sound engineer Bill Porter said that in those days, Orbison’s voice was "very, very thin, so I put a tape slap back from the 3-track machine to his voice on the middle channel, and I made it so it was enough to let his voice stand out, but you didn’t notice the slap too much. If you listen to "Only The Lonely", on the words there "I can tak-k-k-k-e" you can hear it easily".


Moreover, Porter felt that it was his, and Monument's, concept of how to record Roy Orbison, with Foster as producer, himself as engineer and Anita Kerr's arrangements, that made the magic happen. The result, Roy's melodic breathy vocals atop a bed of "dum-dums" and "dooby-doo-wahs", barely audible percussion, all punctuated and underlined with soaring strings, was perfection on wax. Understandably then, Porter was less than impressed when Orbison left Monument and, on July 1st 1965, signed for MGM. At MGM, for the first couple of years at least, Orbison (with able assistance from co-writer and harmony-vocal singer Bill Dees) cut some of his most creative and aesthetically pleasing tracks. But the hits dried up for Roy at MGM, and a somewhat vindicated Porter would say later that all he ever got from Orbison, by way of thanks, "was a steak dinner one time".


There were no headphones and no isolation booths for separating various sounds and instruments. The six strings and five backup singers especially were being picked up much too clearly on Roy’s vocal mic, affecting the clarity of the sound of his voice. … There was a metal coat rack along one wall and I asked Bill (engineer Bill Porter) if it would be feasible to put Roy in one corner of the room and push the coat rack in front of him and cover it with coats to block the band from leaking into Roy’s mic......We had only two-track tape machines to work with; there was no stereo yet. There were no overdubs; everything had to be recorded on one take. Luckily, we put Roy’s voice in the middle, and even today it sounds like stereo." - Fred Foster - “The Soul Of Rock And Roll”



For future use, to replicate the effect of the coat rack, Foster and Bill Porter created timber walls stuffed with insulation and covered in canvas sacking. The walls were on wheels that could be moved around the studio to create an improvised isolation booth. In 1964 Foster opened his own studio in Nashville, the Fred Foster Sound Studios on Seventh Avenue North. Foster acquired the studio from Sam Phillips (the short-lived Sam Phillips Recording Service of Nashville), who himself had acquired it from Billy Sherill and Bill Cooner about three years earlier.


Coming full circle, at the end of 1964, Diamond Records, a small label formed three years earlier and based in New York City, released an album for the artist who would turn out to be their only consistent hit maker, the American singer, Ronnie Dove. The album, Dove's first, was titled "Right Or Wrong", capitalising on his then current single by the same name which had been released in October and would reach #14 on the charts. Now, the interesting part, the back of the album says "Recorded at Fred Foster Sound Studios in Nashville". That doesn't, however, tell the full story.


Whilst Ronnie would indeed go on to record at Fred Foster Sound Studios, his first records (according to Ronnie, the "first six hits we had") were recorded at RCA Studios in Nashville. Ronnie Dove's second RCA session took place sometime in either late August or the first few weeks of September of '64. The session was to record a follow-up to "Say You" (Ronnie's cover of Jamie Coe's 1960 original) which had also been recorded at RCA, and with splendid backup provided by the Jordanaires and the Anita Kerr Singers, had given Dove his first chart record. So, at RCA and with impetus gained from "Say You", Ronnie recorded his cover version of Wanda Jackson's "Right Or Wrong". And it was at this second RCA session that Ronnie Dove would meet and collaborate, a little, with his idol Elvis Presley.
Last edited by mike edwards66 on Sat Dec 02, 2017 10:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 2:23 am

mike edwards66 on Tue Nov 28, 2017 2:59 pm wrote:Even at a young age, Foster knew what a hit record sounded like. In fact, he almost ushered in the biggest signing in music history. One day while driving, Foster heard a then unknown Elvis Presley’s song “I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone” on the radio. He immediately pulled over and then headed to the radio station to ask the DJ who it was.

He called Mercury marketing director Art Talmadge and pleaded with him to buy Presley’s contract. Talmadge didn’t quite hear what all the fuss was about (he even asked, “What kind of a name is that?”), but he went with an offer for the contract. Fosters says Talmadge then called him a few days later saying there’s no way he’d pay what businessman Sam Phillips wanted — $50,000. Talmadge’s highest offer was $35,000.

“I said, ‘Art, you can give him $500,000, it won’t matter, you’ll make it back on the first record,'” Foster says. “He said, ‘You’re insane.’ I said, ‘Possibly, never had to debate that, but I know what I’m telling you.'”




Art Talmadge was right.

$500,000 today would be about $4.5 million dollars.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 3:42 am

drjohncarpenter on Tue Nov 28, 2017 11:23 pm wrote:
mike edwards66 on Tue Nov 28, 2017 2:59 pm wrote:Even at a young age, Foster knew what a hit record sounded like. In fact, he almost ushered in the biggest signing in music history. One day while driving, Foster heard a then unknown Elvis Presley’s song “I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone” on the radio. He immediately pulled over and then headed to the radio station to ask the DJ who it was.

He called Mercury marketing director Art Talmadge and pleaded with him to buy Presley’s contract. Talmadge didn’t quite hear what all the fuss was about (he even asked, “What kind of a name is that?”), but he went with an offer for the contract. Fosters says Talmadge then called him a few days later saying there’s no way he’d pay what businessman Sam Phillips wanted — $50,000. Talmadge’s highest offer was $35,000.

“I said, ‘Art, you can give him $500,000, it won’t matter, you’ll make it back on the first record,'” Foster says. “He said, ‘You’re insane.’ I said, ‘Possibly, never had to debate that, but I know what I’m telling you.'”




Art Talmadge was right.

$500,000 today would be about $4.5 million dollars.



$500,000 in 1955 for the artist who would turn out to be the musical Big Bang of the 20th Century, and his first record for a new company, "Heartbreak Hotel", would turn out to be the b of the bang.

Fred Foster was right.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:09 pm

I have never heard of this before but it's not surprising. This is interesting that Mercury made an offer to buy out Elvis' contract in May of 1955 but Sam Phillips wanted more. Only to turn around a few months later and except the same amount with a different label. When Elvis' contract was put up for sale I don't remember Mercury being in the mix. Only Decca, Atlantic, Columbia, Capitol and RCA. Mercury may have been involved in that though. I wonder how Mercury would have handled Elvis I've always thought RCA did a real good job in the 50's for the most part. It's also ironic that if Mercury had made the same offer later in that year they might have got Elvis. I do agree with Dr.Carpenter that no record label would've paid $500,000 in 1955 that was a huge amount of money. I could see a record label going as high as $50,000 but that's about it. Thanks for posting this Mike Edwards. This is fascinating.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:24 pm

brian on Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:09 am wrote:I have never heard of this before but it's not surpising. This is interesting that Mercury made an offer to buy out Elvis' contract in May of 1955 but Sam Phillips wanted more. Only to turn around a few months later and except the same amount with a different label. When Elvis' contract was put up for sale I don't remember Mercury being in the mix. Only Decca, Atlantic, Columbia, Capitol and RCA. Mercury may have been involved in that though. I wonder how Mercury would have handled Elvis I always thought RCA did a real good job in the 50s for the most part. It's also ironic that if Mercury had made the same offer later in that year they might have got Elvis. Thanks for posting this Mike Edwards this is fascinating.



Maybe it's not been heard before because it's unverified. The linked article offers no sources, and the author, Jeremy Burchard, is best known as "the blonde half of country duo Moonlight Social."

http://www.wideopencountry.com/author/jeremy-burchard/

In Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n' Roll, historian Peter Guralnick's 2016 biography, Fred Foster is only discussed regarding the February 1964 purchase of Phillips' Nashville studio. One might think a May 1955 offer for Elvis' Sun contract -- and refusal -- would merit a sentence or two.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:01 pm

drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:24 pm wrote:The linked article offers no sources........

Apart from Fred Foster.


drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:24 pm wrote:......and the author, Jeremy Burchard, is best known as "the blonde half of country duo Moonlight Social."

And?


drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:24 pm wrote:In Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n' Roll, historian Peter Guralnick's 2016 biography, Fred Foster is only discussed regarding the February 1964 purchase of Phillips' Nashville studio. One might think a May 1955 offer for Elvis' Sun contract -- and refusal -- would merit a sentence or two.

He obviously didn't know about it!


brian wrote:Thanks for posting this Mike Edwards. This is fascinating.

You're more than welcome, brian. It's always a pleasure to bring new information to FECC!

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:25 pm

mike edwards66 on Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:01 am wrote:
drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:24 pm wrote:In Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n' Roll, historian Peter Guralnick's 2016 biography, Fred Foster is only discussed regarding the February 1964 purchase of Phillips' Nashville studio. One might think a May 1955 offer for Elvis' Sun contract -- and refusal -- would merit a sentence or two.

He obviously didn't know about it!



Peter Guralnick interviewed Fred Foster many times, going back to the first volume of his two-part Elvis Presley biography. You are being willfully ignorant to suggest that no mention was ever made of this very significant event. Peter doesn't write about it because it did not happen.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:50 pm

drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:25 pm wrote:
mike edwards66 on Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:01 am wrote:
drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 5:24 pm wrote:In Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n' Roll, historian Peter Guralnick's 2016 biography, Fred Foster is only discussed regarding the February 1964 purchase of Phillips' Nashville studio. One might think a May 1955 offer for Elvis' Sun contract -- and refusal -- would merit a sentence or two.

He obviously didn't know about it!



Peter Guralnick interviewed Fred Foster many times, going back to the first volume of his two-part Elvis Presley biography. You are being willfully ignorant to suggest that no mention was ever made of this very significant event. Peter doesn't write about it because it did not happen.



Ah. So once again, you are calling someone, who was there, a liar. Fred Foster is a liar, Ronnie Dove is a liar. Anyone in fact, who doesn't agree with your version of events (although, Paul (no jam) McCartney gets away with "misremembering", ha!).

It's pretty clear you don't like new information unless you or a loved one bring it. Well, I've got news for you, buddy. We don't care what you like.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:13 pm

To be fair I'm not sure if this story is true or not either. On one hand Elvis had to have been on the radar of people within the music industry in 1955 before signing with RCA that November. In an article I read with Hank Snow he claimed to have gotten to know Elvis while on tour and then he went and met with Steve Sholes and tried to get him to buy Elvis' contract earlier in 1955. Hank Snow told Steve Sholes he could buy Elvis' contract for $10,000 but as we know Steve didn't sign him until a few months later. Fred Foster certainly could have met with people at Mercury and told them about Elvis. I just don't know about an actual offer being made. It could be but I've never heard Sam Phillips mention it. He only ever mentioned in interviews that selling Elvis' contract only came about because of Colonel Parker starting a rumor that Elvis' contract was for sale. To my knowledge he never mentioned offers for Elvis' prior to that. Would he have turned down $35,000 from Mercury. There's been a bunch of false information written about Elvis to the point that fans don't know what to believe anymore. They are skeptical about everything. I can understand that.

David Bowie was going to produce an album for Elvis in 1977 but he died before that could happen.
Elvis was going to have a pro wrestling match with Jerry Lawler at the Mid South coliseum in 1977 but he died.
Buddy Holly taught Elvis the song Money Honey in 1955.
Tura Satana taught Elvis his hip gyrations in Chicago in 1955.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:40 am

mike edwards66 on Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:50 am wrote:Ah. So once again, you are calling someone, who was there, a liar.



This is not what I am doing. My comments, are as clear as day. I have copied them below for further scrutiny.

Misdirecting the discussion in your usual fashion only makes it obvious my observations have merit.



#1
drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 9:24 am wrote:Maybe it's not been heard before because it's unverified. The linked article offers no sources, and the author, Jeremy Burchard, is best known as "the blonde half of country duo Moonlight Social."

http://www.wideopencountry.com/author/jeremy-burchard/

In Sam Phillips: The Man Who Invented Rock 'n' Roll, historian Peter Guralnick's 2016 biography, Fred Foster is only discussed regarding the February 1964 purchase of Phillips' Nashville studio. One might think a May 1955 offer for Elvis' Sun contract -- and refusal -- would merit a sentence or two.




#2
drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 6:25 pm wrote:Peter Guralnick interviewed Fred Foster many times, going back to the first volume of his two-part Elvis Presley biography. You are being willfully ignorant to suggest that no mention was ever made of this very significant event. Peter doesn't write about it because it did not happen.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:41 am

drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:40 pm wrote:
mike edwards66 on Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:50 am wrote:Ah. So once again, you are calling someone, who was there, a liar.

This is not what I am doing. My comments, are as clear as day. I have copied them below for further scrutiny.



Thank you for copying your comments. Allow me to summarize them:

drjohncarpenter on Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:40 pm wrote:..........it did not happen.


There ya go. So once again, you are calling someone, who was there, at the time, a liar.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:56 am

brian on Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:13 pm wrote:To be fair I'm not sure if this story is true or not either.

To be fair, brian, none of us were there. But, why would industry legend, Fred Foster, lie. The suggestion is both preposterous and disrespectful.


brian on Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:13 pm wrote:In an article I read with Hank Snow he claimed to have gotten to know Elvis while on tour.......

Funny you should say that. Hank Snow is on record as saying that he knew Elvis Presley before he (Elvis) made his Opry appearance. Of course, when I brought this information to FECC (I love bringing new information to FECC), you can probably guess who cried "I don't believe it".

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:41 am

I'm just saying with so much false information over the years I'm skeptical about a lot of things regarding Elvis. A lot of people are. Besides you should know even famous people with seemingly no reason to make up stories about Elvis have. If you notice that article you posted is about Charlie Daniels, Randy Travis and Fred Foster. When it gets to the part about Fred Foster if you look carefully that's not a direct quote from Fred Foster. I would like someone to ask Fred Foster about that directly. To be sure.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:42 am

Interestingly, reviewing the article by "the blonde half of country duo Moonlight Social," Jeremy Burchard, it does not indicate if he actually interviewed Fred Foster. There is nothing that states he met him, or spoke with him. That's kind of odd.

Digging around, it appears the quotes may derive from a video interview on this NAMM page:

https://www.namm.org/library/oral-history/fred-foster

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 4:09 am

drjohncarpenter on Thu Nov 30, 2017 12:42 am wrote:Interestingly, reviewing the article by "the blonde half of country duo Moonlight Social," Jeremy Burchard, it does not indicate if he actually interviewed Fred Foster. There is nothing that states he met him, or spoke with him. That's kind of odd.

Digging around, it appears the quotes may derive from a video interview on this NAMM page:

https://www.namm.org/library/oral-history/fred-foster


Excellent addition, forum friend! So, we agree, it did happen.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 6:31 am

I watched the video with Fred Foster and he doesn't exactly say when Mercury made the offer on Elvis' contract. By listening to him speak I got the impression that Mercury made the offer at the same time ever other label did. Which was when Colonel Parker convinced Sam Phillips to sell Elvis' contract. That has never been disputed because it's been known for decades that several labels tried to buy Elvis' contract at that time. Neither the article by Jeremy Burchard nor the video interview with Fred Foster state that it was May of 1955 when Mercury made the offer. So Fred Foster wasn't ahead of everyone else when it came to Elvis.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 7:15 am

brian on Wed Nov 29, 2017 7:31 pm wrote:I watched the video with Fred Foster and he doesn't exactly say when Mercury made the offer on Elvis' contract. By listening to him speak I got the impression that Mercury made the offer at the same time ever other label did. Which was when Colonel Parker convinced Sam Phillips to sell Elvis' contract. That has never been disputed because it's been known for decades that several labels tried to buy Elvis' contract at that time. Neither the article by Jeremy Burchard nor the video interview with Fred Foster state that it was May of 1955 when Mercury made the offer. So Fred Foster wasn't ahead of everyone else when it came to Elvis.



This is a fun story to read. I wish we had evidence that it was true. But we do not. Of that we can all agree.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:06 am

Thanks Mike! Great findings and definite connection. Norbert Putnam compared Fred Foster to Felton Jarvis as producers in (words to the effect) both having great ears for what the public wanted in music.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:13 am

Damn. It's too bad then that Mercury didn't get Elvis' contract.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:48 am

brian wrote:I watched the video with Fred Foster and he doesn't exactly say when Mercury made the offer on Elvis' contract.

"He said, "Well, here it is, the hottest record in town"..." equals May 1955. Fred Foster was ahead of the game.



Juan Luis on Thu Nov 30, 2017 5:06 am wrote:Thanks Mike! Great findings and definite connection. Norbert Putnam compared Fred Foster to Felton Jarvis as producers in (words to the effect) both having great ears for what the public wanted in music.

Thanks, Juan. As you and I know, it's a pleasure to bring new findings to FECC! Interesting that Norbert Putnam should compare Fred Foster to Felton Jarvis in that respect. It's funny now, because we are so far removed from the action, we don't appreciate the 'family tree' connections these guys, who were there at the time, would spot in a heartbeat.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:34 am

mike edwards66 on Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:48 pm wrote:
brian wrote:I watched the video with Fred Foster and he doesn't exactly say when Mercury made the offer on Elvis' contract.

"He said, "Well, here it is, the hottest record in town"..." equals May 1955.



:D

How in the world did Peter Guralnick miss mentioning that in two different books on the subject?

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Fri Dec 01, 2017 2:54 am

drjohncarpenter on Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:34 pm wrote:
mike edwards66 on Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:48 pm wrote:
brian wrote:I watched the video with Fred Foster and he doesn't exactly say when Mercury made the offer on Elvis' contract.

"He said, "Well, here it is, the hottest record in town"..." equals May 1955.



:D

How in the world did Peter Guralnick miss mentioning that in two different books on the subject?


Probably the same way he missed that it was Marion Keisker who discovered Elvis Presley.

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Fri Dec 01, 2017 11:05 pm

mike edwards66 on Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:54 pm wrote:
drjohncarpenter on Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:34 pm wrote:
mike edwards66 on Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:48 pm wrote:
brian wrote:I watched the video with Fred Foster and he doesn't exactly say when Mercury made the offer on Elvis' contract.

"He said, "Well, here it is, the hottest record in town"..." equals May 1955.



:D

How in the world did Peter Guralnick miss mentioning that in two different books on the subject?


Probably the same way he missed that it was Marion Keisker who discovered Elvis Presley.


Ah, but he didn't.

Once again, you have no answer to a very simple question, so you try to divert attention elsewhere.

Whenever you want to address the three points I made on your topic, go for it. :smt023

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Sun Dec 03, 2017 2:10 am

drjohncarpenter on Fri Dec 01, 2017 8:05 pm wrote:
mike edwards66 on Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:54 pm wrote:
drjohncarpenter on Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:34 pm wrote:How in the world did Peter Guralnick miss mentioning that in two different books on the subject?

Probably the same way he missed that it was Marion Keisker who discovered Elvis Presley.

Ah, but he didn't.

Is that right!


Mercury tried to sign Elvis Presley! I feel your pain, forum friend. If only it had been you, or a loved one, who had brought this new information to FECC. But it wasn't and you can't stand it. Instead of concentrating on what Peter Guralnick DIDN'T say, concentrate on what Fred Foster DID say:

"Heartbreak Hotel is sitting at number one............what would that have done for Mercury.............can you imagine, I was right, he would have made it back on the first record"



Whilst we ponder that, let's remind ourselves, of the "disappointment" one Elvis fan felt at Peter Guralnick's sweeping Marion Keisker into "the dustbin of history": viewtopic.php?f=1&t=88576

drjohncarpenter on Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:28 pm wrote:In the first volume of his Presley biography, published in 1994, Guralnick places both of them there in July 1953. Keisker is the kindly secretary that day, and nothing more. Elvis' interaction with Phillips "in the control room" is minimal. However, in the book's end-notes, Peter back-pedals.

Ouch! And if there is one thing you know about, it's back-pedals.


drjohncarpenter on Thu Nov 19, 2015 4:26 pm wrote:
TJ wrote:So does Sam mention that Sam and Marion disagreed about who recorded Elvis the first time or does he just go straight to Sam's version?
When reading Peter Guralnick's work as it relates to the Elvis story, do not forget he is a loyal person (Tom Parker, Jerry Schilling, Sam Phillips).
For this fan, though, it is a disappointment.

Ouch!


drjohncarpenter on Wed Dec 23, 2015 8:20 pm wrote:It's a shame Marion Keisker is being swept into the dustbin of history. If only Elvis had lived long enough to set the story down in his own words. She would have gotten her due, and both Sam and Peter would have to accept that.

OUCH!

Re: The Fred Foster Connection

Sun Dec 03, 2017 7:46 am

mike edwards66 on Sat Dec 02, 2017 7:10 pm wrote:
drjohncarpenter on Fri Dec 01, 2017 8:05 pm wrote:
mike edwards66 on Thu Nov 30, 2017 3:54 pm wrote:
drjohncarpenter on Thu Nov 30, 2017 11:34 pm wrote:How in the world did Peter Guralnick miss mentioning that in two different books on the subject?

Probably the same way he missed that it was Marion Keisker who discovered Elvis Presley.

Ah, but he didn't.

Is that right!


Mercury tried to sign Elvis Presley! I feel your pain, forum friend. If only it had been you, or a loved one, who had brought this new information to FECC. But it wasn't and you can't stand it. Instead of concentrating on what Peter Guralnick DIDN'T say, concentrate on what Fred Foster DID say:

"Heartbreak Hotel is sitting at number one............what would that have done for Mercury.............can you imagine, I was right, he would have made it back on the first record"



Whilst we ponder that, let's remind ourselves, of the "disappointment" one Elvis fan felt at Peter Guralnick's sweeping Marion Keisker into "the dustbin of history": viewtopic.php?f=1&t=88576

drjohncarpenter on Fri Jun 05, 2015 6:28 pm wrote:In the first volume of his Presley biography, published in 1994, Guralnick places both of them there in July 1953. Keisker is the kindly secretary that day, and nothing more. Elvis' interaction with Phillips "in the control room" is minimal. However, in the book's end-notes, Peter back-pedals.

Ouch! And if there is one thing you know about, it's back-pedals.


drjohncarpenter on Thu Nov 19, 2015 4:26 pm wrote:
TJ wrote:So does Sam mention that Sam and Marion disagreed about who recorded Elvis the first time or does he just go straight to Sam's version?
When reading Peter Guralnick's work as it relates to the Elvis story, do not forget he is a loyal person (Tom Parker, Jerry Schilling, Sam Phillips).
For this fan, though, it is a disappointment.

Ouch!


drjohncarpenter on Wed Dec 23, 2015 8:20 pm wrote:It's a shame Marion Keisker is being swept into the dustbin of history. If only Elvis had lived long enough to set the story down in his own words. She would have gotten her due, and both Sam and Peter would have to accept that.

OUCH!

OUCH indeed!