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"I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:28 pm

First song recorded by Elvis Presley for the final 1950's sessions in Nashville at RCA Studio B on June 10, 1958. Written by Sid Wayne and Bix Reichner. Produced by Steve Sholes and Elvis Presley. Elvis worked 18 takes for the master. The cut was wisely held for release until March 1959 by RCA and Parker to close the gap of finite recordings that would have to cover Elvis' tenure in the United States Army. Elvis would have only one single in the can until his 1960 return from Germany. That was "A Big Hunk O' Love". "I Need Your Love Tonight" reached #4 on Billboard and #1 UK as a double-A side with "A Fool Such As I".
Great song performance with standout guitar playing by the virtuoso Hank Garland. In my opinion, very influential for rock guitar sounds of early to mid 1960's.

From Wikipedia: "1958 marked the height of the rockabilly era. Garland's guitar drove such classic recordings as Benny Joy's "Bundle of Love" and "I'm Gonna Move", Jimmy Loyd's "You're Gone Baby" & "I've Got A Rocket In My Pocket", Lefty Frizzell's "You're Humbuggin' Me" Simon Crum's "Stand Up, Sit Down, Shut Your Mouth", and Johnny Strickland's "She's Mine." He also backed major crossover artists as well. Don Gibson's "Sweet Sweet Girl" & "Don't Tell Me Your Troubles", Patsy Cline's "Let the Teardrops Fall" Ronnie Hawkins' "Jambalaya" and Faron Young's "Alone with You" spotlighted Garland's adept guitar work. Relatively obscure artists such as Jimmy Donley have reached cult status due in no small part to Garland's guitar artistry. Donley's 1960 record "My Baby's Gone" showcases another of Hank's superb riffs.
He also played with jazz artists such as George Shearing and Charlie Parker in New York and went on to record Jazz Winds From a New Direction, showcasing his evolving talent, along with Gary Burton on vibraphone, Joe Benjamin on acoustic bass and Joe Morello on drums. It is believed that Garland was the first to explore the use of the power chord in popular music."

I NEED YOUR LOVE TONIGHT!


Last edited by Juan Luis on Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 9:34 pm

It's notable that Elvis included this number in his live set in 1961. He must have liked it quite a bit.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 10:00 pm

I've long felt this number has a Buddy Holly vibe to it.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 10:11 pm

I've never really been particularly fond of this track, although I love Elvis' enthusiasm and vocal.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 10:11 pm

This is certainly one that I thought serious about "tossing" in the what would you lose thread. It may have been a hit, and Garland's playing and Elvis's singing might be great, but it really is a stupid, infantile lyric that makes it no surprise that Elvis wanted to move away from rock n roll on his return from the army. We now know that at home over the next few years he was singing the likes of I'm Beginning to Forget You, Mona Lisa, Danny Boy, There's No Tomorrow, Soldier Boy, The Fool, and songs from Carousel and Show Boat - and here he was saddled with a bunch of "wow-ees" "swee-dees" and "pow pows".

Over the coming years, Sid Wayne would contribute a considerable number of songs for Elvis soundtracks. While we might lament the likes of Do the Clam and He's Your Uncle Not Your Dad, it's fair to say that only Elvis's (and the band's) energy and commitment in June 1958 made "I Need Your Love Tonight" rise above them.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 10:44 pm

poormadpeter2 wrote:This is certainly one that I thought serious about "tossing" in the what would you lose thread. It may have been a hit, and Garland's playing and Elvis's singing might be great, but it really is a stupid, infantile lyric that makes it no surprise that Elvis wanted to move away from rock n roll on his return from the army. We now know that at home over the next few years he was singing the likes of I'm Beginning to Forget You, Mona Lisa, Danny Boy, There's No Tomorrow, Soldier Boy, The Fool, and songs from Carousel and Show Boat - and here he was saddled with a bunch of "wow-ees" "swee-dees" and "pow pows".

Over the coming years, Sid Wayne would contribute a considerable number of songs for Elvis soundtracks. While we might lament the likes of Do the Clam and He's Your Uncle Not Your Dad, it's fair to say that only Elvis's (and the band's) energy and commitment in June 1958 made "I Need Your Love Tonight" rise above them.


I don't know, I reckon you can't beat a good dose of 'wow-ees', 'swee-dees' and 'pow-pows'! Don't forget, though a little more pedestrian, 'Stuck On You' and 'Good Luck Charm' had a lot of 'uh-uh huh's' included and come '63 there was a healthy helping of 'Da Da Da Da Da Dum Dum Dums' coupled with 'Ow -Ows' on the flipside here in the UK and not so long after 'Yeah' 'Yeah' Yeah's' and 'Ooooh's' started a whole new chapter in the Rock 'n' Roll world as we know it...
Even Cliff singing Leiber & Stoller's Lucky Lips in 1963 had a bit of 'duh duh du-du-du duh's' included, so infantile lyrics et al weren't too passé five years later on from 'I Need Your Love Tonight'. :mrgreen:

Oh and I love the song by the way, I think it's fair rockin'!

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 11:16 pm

When In Rome wrote:
poormadpeter2 wrote:This is certainly one that I thought serious about "tossing" in the what would you lose thread. It may have been a hit, and Garland's playing and Elvis's singing might be great, but it really is a stupid, infantile lyric that makes it no surprise that Elvis wanted to move away from rock n roll on his return from the army. We now know that at home over the next few years he was singing the likes of I'm Beginning to Forget You, Mona Lisa, Danny Boy, There's No Tomorrow, Soldier Boy, The Fool, and songs from Carousel and Show Boat - and here he was saddled with a bunch of "wow-ees" "swee-dees" and "pow pows".

Over the coming years, Sid Wayne would contribute a considerable number of songs for Elvis soundtracks. While we might lament the likes of Do the Clam and He's Your Uncle Not Your Dad, it's fair to say that only Elvis's (and the band's) energy and commitment in June 1958 made "I Need Your Love Tonight" rise above them.


I don't know, I reckon you can't beat a good dose of 'wow-ees', 'swee-dees' and 'pow-pows'! Don't forget, though a little more pedestrian, 'Stuck On You' and 'Good Luck Charm' had a lot of 'uh-uh huh's' included and come '63 there was a healthy helping of 'Da Da Da Da Da Dum Dum Dums' coupled with 'Ow -Ows' on the flipside here in the UK and not so long after 'Yeah' 'Yeah' Yeah's' and 'Ooooh's' started a whole new chapter in the Rock 'n' Roll world as we know it...
Even Cliff singing Leiber & Stoller's Lucky Lips in 1963 had a bit of 'duh duh du-du-du duh's' included, so infantile lyrics et al weren't too passé five years later on from 'I Need Your Love Tonight'. :mrgreen:

Oh and I love the song by the way, I think it's fair rockin'!


Oh, I'm not denying the fact that it was typical of the time, just that they really now seem, to use your term, infantile. The same is true in some ways of I Got Stung and Wear My Ring Around Your Neck as well, although at least the former have the relative novelty of the bee metaphor. What rises these songs above the banal is the way that Elvis attacks them to a degree he hadn't attacked anything since Hound Dog two years earlier. But as pieces of material, they are pretty awful.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 11:18 pm

It's 1958. It's a true rocker. It's powerful and dynamic. Elvis'vocals are as good as can be. A winner for me.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Mon Sep 26, 2016 11:21 pm

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Yes, the song was written (composed) by Sid Wayne. But - as is written in the OP - also by Bickley "Bix" Reichner, and as far as I know, it was the only song Bix Reichner co-wrote for Elvis. Reichner was always primarily responsible for the lyrics. Besides being a song-writer, Reichner also was a crime-reporter and had to combine the two jobs. A nice story about how he dit it will follow. First another song he co-wrote and which we all know:



Perry recorded "Papa Loves Mambo" on August 31, 1954.


And from 1955 we know:




Recorded live on Dec. 9, 1956, but recorded in the studio already on August 14, 1945. Just after the ending of WWII:

Image






There was also a connection with Linda Thompson. Later in his career Reichner wrote lyrics for the television show Hee Haw.



'Bix' Reichner, 84; Wrote Lyrics, Reported News
By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer | POSTED: April 12, 1989

S. Bickley "Bix" Reichner, 84, a longtime Bulletin crime reporter who also penned lyrics for a string of popular songs recorded by such performers as Elvis Presley, Tommy Dorsey and Johnny Mathis, died Sunday at the Main Line Nursing Home in Paoli.

He was a resident of West Chester and had lived for many years in Paoli.

Raised in Overbrook, the son of a gas company worker, Mr. Reichner went

from a brief stint at West Philadelphia High School to Broadway, where he lent a promising baritone to productions of The Student Prince and Princess Flavia.

Mr. Reichner was still a teenager when he joined the Evening Bulletin. He remained there for 25 years, working much of his time as the West Philadelphia ''district man" from the police station at 55th and Pine.

Ingratiating and gregarious, Mr. Reichner kept on top of what happened in West Philadelphia. His sources were so good that police, firefighters and magistrates called him to report the news.

It was the kind of job that could free a reporter to do other things if he set it up the right way.

That Mr. Reichner did.

For him, free hours were time for song writing. He wrote tunes for Mask and Wig productions at the University of Pennsylvania for more than a decade and began collaborating with a Main Line dentist, Clay Boland.

By the late 1930s he was churning out hits. There was "Stop Beating 'Round the Mulberry Bush," first recorded by Tommy Dorsey, and "You Better Go Now," recorded by Jeri Southern and later by Buddy Greco and Johnny Mathis.

In 1938 he was offered a $1,500-a-week job in Hollywood writing songs for movies - but turned it down to remain a reporter, according to a report in the news-industry magazine Editor and Publisher.

But the marriage of writing lyrics and reporting the news wasn't always smooth sailing. His colleagues often had to cover for him when he was tending to business in New York.

And there was the time when a fire broke out in West Philadelphia - and Mr. Reichner was in Manhattan with his music publisher, who was insisting that he come to New York more frequently. Word leaked into the Bulletin city room that Mr. Reichner wasn't around, so another reporter was sent to the scene.

Then the phone rang. It was Mr. Reichner. "I got that fire," he told Robert J. Williams, who was an editor on the city desk that day.

"He was 90 miles away, and he didn't do any worse than the guy who was on the scene," recalled Williams, who worked with Mr. Reichner 10 years and remained a friend. "His contacts had called him in New York to tell him about the fire. . . . Nobody had a better rapport with the cops - and they protected him, no matter if he was in New York or Oshkosh."

Mr. Reichner ended his work at the Bulletin only when - after 25 years - a new editor brought him back to the city room and assigned him to write picture captions. He fumed, and then one day the dry-witted Mr. Reichner overlined a photograph of a puppy sitting in an overturned derby with the words, "In your hat."

The overline lasted one edition, and it wasn't long before Mr. Reichner also was gone.

It was then that the song writing that had started as moonlighting became his full-time occupation. His success continued.

Primarily responsible for lyrics, Mr. Reichner created words for "Papa Loves Mambo," recorded by Perry Como; "I Need Your Love Tonight," recorded by Elvis Presley; "When I Go A-Dreamin', " recorded by Artie Shaw and later Benny Goodman, and "If You Know the Lord," recorded by George Beverly Shea.

He also wrote "Teen-Age Prayer," recorded by Gloria Mann, and "The Fightin' Phils," a theme song popular when the Phillies won the pennant in 1950.

"He was very facile with lyrics," said Williams. "You could tell him what you wanted, and he could do it. He was a tunesmith, you could say, a creature of Tin Pan Alley."

During the McCarthy era, Mr. Reichner's creative efforts also took a political turn. With Jimmy Kennedy, he wrote the patriotic song "The Red We Want is the Red We Got - In the Old Red, White and Blue." He was presented with a Freedom Foundation Award.

A wiry, bespectacled man, Mr. Reichner often put together his compositions at home, writing on a piece of paper beside him on the piano bench - and sometimes coming up with an idea in the middle of the night. It seemed as if he was always at the piano, said a daughter, Judith Ditz.

"He always thought he could have made more money and gained more notoriety if he moved to New York," said Ditz. "But he didn't want to do that. He wanted to be here with his family. The family was most important to him, and in New York he thought he'd never be home."

Later, with Elliott Lawrence, Mr. Reichner wrote "The Ballad of Valley Forge," a symphony performed in Valley Forge for the 1976 Bicentennial.

For many years after he left the Bulletin, Mr. Reichner augmented his prolific song-writing with business ventures, as the owner of two publishing companies, Malvern Music Co. and Mamy Music, both in Malvern.

And for the last 20 years he had been traveling twice a year to Nashville to write lyrics for the television show Hee Haw. He was writing songs until just before he died.

"He was very, very willing to help anyone who wanted to get started in the business. He always told them it was very hard, but he would spend a lot of time with them helping them," Ditz said.

Mr. Reichner enjoyed gardening and belonged to the Masons, the Song Writers Guild of America, the Philadelphia Press Club and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

Surviving are his wife of 55 years, Marian Yarnall Reichner; daughters, Jill Frank and Judith Ditz, and five grandchildren.

Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. April 22 at Mauger's Funeral Home, Monument Avenue, Malvern.


Source: http://articles.philly.com/1989-04-12/news/26142959_1_smooth-sailing-lyrics-tommy-dorsey

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Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 12:43 am

MikeFromHolland wrote:.

Yes, the song was written (composed) by Sid Wayne. But - as is written in the OP - also by Bickley "Bix" Reichner, and as far as I know, it was the only song Bix Reichner co-wrote for Elvis. Reichner was always primarily responsible for the lyrics. Besides being a song-writer, Reichner also was a crime-reporter and had to combine the two jobs. A nice story about how he dit it will follow. First another song he co-wrote and which we all know:



Perry recorded "Papa Loves Mambo" on August 31, 1954.


And from 1955 we know:




Recorded live on Dec. 9, 1956, but recorded in the studio already on August 14, 1945. Just after the ending of WWII:

Image






There was also a connection with Linda Thompson. Later in his career Reichner wrote lyrics for the television show Hee Haw.



'Bix' Reichner, 84; Wrote Lyrics, Reported News
By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer | POSTED: April 12, 1989

S. Bickley "Bix" Reichner, 84, a longtime Bulletin crime reporter who also penned lyrics for a string of popular songs recorded by such performers as Elvis Presley, Tommy Dorsey and Johnny Mathis, died Sunday at the Main Line Nursing Home in Paoli.

He was a resident of West Chester and had lived for many years in Paoli.

Raised in Overbrook, the son of a gas company worker, Mr. Reichner went

from a brief stint at West Philadelphia High School to Broadway, where he lent a promising baritone to productions of The Student Prince and Princess Flavia.

Mr. Reichner was still a teenager when he joined the Evening Bulletin. He remained there for 25 years, working much of his time as the West Philadelphia ''district man" from the police station at 55th and Pine.

Ingratiating and gregarious, Mr. Reichner kept on top of what happened in West Philadelphia. His sources were so good that police, firefighters and magistrates called him to report the news.

It was the kind of job that could free a reporter to do other things if he set it up the right way.

That Mr. Reichner did.

For him, free hours were time for song writing. He wrote tunes for Mask and Wig productions at the University of Pennsylvania for more than a decade and began collaborating with a Main Line dentist, Clay Boland.

By the late 1930s he was churning out hits. There was "Stop Beating 'Round the Mulberry Bush," first recorded by Tommy Dorsey, and "You Better Go Now," recorded by Jeri Southern and later by Buddy Greco and Johnny Mathis.

In 1938 he was offered a $1,500-a-week job in Hollywood writing songs for movies - but turned it down to remain a reporter, according to a report in the news-industry magazine Editor and Publisher.

But the marriage of writing lyrics and reporting the news wasn't always smooth sailing. His colleagues often had to cover for him when he was tending to business in New York.

And there was the time when a fire broke out in West Philadelphia - and Mr. Reichner was in Manhattan with his music publisher, who was insisting that he come to New York more frequently. Word leaked into the Bulletin city room that Mr. Reichner wasn't around, so another reporter was sent to the scene.

Then the phone rang. It was Mr. Reichner. "I got that fire," he told Robert J. Williams, who was an editor on the city desk that day.

"He was 90 miles away, and he didn't do any worse than the guy who was on the scene," recalled Williams, who worked with Mr. Reichner 10 years and remained a friend. "His contacts had called him in New York to tell him about the fire. . . . Nobody had a better rapport with the cops - and they protected him, no matter if he was in New York or Oshkosh."

Mr. Reichner ended his work at the Bulletin only when - after 25 years - a new editor brought him back to the city room and assigned him to write picture captions. He fumed, and then one day the dry-witted Mr. Reichner overlined a photograph of a puppy sitting in an overturned derby with the words, "In your hat."

The overline lasted one edition, and it wasn't long before Mr. Reichner also was gone.

It was then that the song writing that had started as moonlighting became his full-time occupation. His success continued.

Primarily responsible for lyrics, Mr. Reichner created words for "Papa Loves Mambo," recorded by Perry Como; "I Need Your Love Tonight," recorded by Elvis Presley; "When I Go A-Dreamin', " recorded by Artie Shaw and later Benny Goodman, and "If You Know the Lord," recorded by George Beverly Shea.

He also wrote "Teen-Age Prayer," recorded by Gloria Mann, and "The Fightin' Phils," a theme song popular when the Phillies won the pennant in 1950.

"He was very facile with lyrics," said Williams. "You could tell him what you wanted, and he could do it. He was a tunesmith, you could say, a creature of Tin Pan Alley."

During the McCarthy era, Mr. Reichner's creative efforts also took a political turn. With Jimmy Kennedy, he wrote the patriotic song "The Red We Want is the Red We Got - In the Old Red, White and Blue." He was presented with a Freedom Foundation Award.

A wiry, bespectacled man, Mr. Reichner often put together his compositions at home, writing on a piece of paper beside him on the piano bench - and sometimes coming up with an idea in the middle of the night. It seemed as if he was always at the piano, said a daughter, Judith Ditz.

"He always thought he could have made more money and gained more notoriety if he moved to New York," said Ditz. "But he didn't want to do that. He wanted to be here with his family. The family was most important to him, and in New York he thought he'd never be home."

Later, with Elliott Lawrence, Mr. Reichner wrote "The Ballad of Valley Forge," a symphony performed in Valley Forge for the 1976 Bicentennial.

For many years after he left the Bulletin, Mr. Reichner augmented his prolific song-writing with business ventures, as the owner of two publishing companies, Malvern Music Co. and Mamy Music, both in Malvern.

And for the last 20 years he had been traveling twice a year to Nashville to write lyrics for the television show Hee Haw. He was writing songs until just before he died.

"He was very, very willing to help anyone who wanted to get started in the business. He always told them it was very hard, but he would spend a lot of time with them helping them," Ditz said.

Mr. Reichner enjoyed gardening and belonged to the Masons, the Song Writers Guild of America, the Philadelphia Press Club and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

Surviving are his wife of 55 years, Marian Yarnall Reichner; daughters, Jill Frank and Judith Ditz, and five grandchildren.

Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. April 22 at Mauger's Funeral Home, Monument Avenue, Malvern.


Source: http://articles.philly.com/1989-04-12/news/26142959_1_smooth-sailing-lyrics-tommy-dorsey

.


Thanks for the info. Nice work!

One has to wonder how the writer of the lyrics of You Better Go Now is the same one as that which wrote I Need Your Love Tonight! Interestingly, Ella Fitzgerald supposedly said You Better Go Now was her favourite Billie Holiday recording (although I don't think she covered it). Holiday herself liked it enough to add it to her live act for a decade (possibly more), with versions surviving from 1947 and 2 from 1957 - as well as the 1 from 1956 in your post. There's also a very nice version of it by Jeri Southern.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 1:10 am

Christmas Morning, 1963 :

I had a new record player (phonograph/gramophone) and I had bought Elvis' Gold Records Vol. 2 (U.K. version). I was desperate to hear A Fool Such As I again (possibly for the first time since 1959, when they used to play it loud, next door) so I played Side 2 first.

Out of the single mono speaker came the blast of "I Need Your Love Tonight" and the sheer exuberance of teenage love. Who cares if the lyrics are juvenile . . . so were the record buyers !! It's a fabulous recording.

Consider the lyrics of the much lauded "I Met Her Today" : the whole premise is barely credible, i.e. meeting someone once and proclaiming that she is the one above all others.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 2:06 am

My favorite lyric is "hi fi high and the lights down low". Still works today! :)

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 2:07 am

Hi there!! :D :D :D.

Great song but I prefer the other side: "A Fool Such As I". That´s a classic on the Elvis catalog! :smt020. Bye for now :smt006.



Image
A Fool Such as I/I Need Your Love Tonight. RCA Victor 47-7506. Released on March 10th,1959. Front cover.

Image
A Fool Such as I/I Need Your Love Tonight. RCA Victor 47-7506. Released on March 10th,1959. Super rare "Elvis-Sails" back cover.

P.S: The regular back cover of this 45 rpm, had a list of the current Elvis singles & eps.

Image
A Fool Such as I/I Need Your Love Tonight. RCA Victor 47-7506. Released on March 10th,1959. Regular back cover.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 2:30 am

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Last edited by Juan Luis on Fri Dec 09, 2016 7:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 2:32 am

Steve Morse wrote:Christmas Morning, 1963 :

I had a new record player (phonograph/gramophone) and I had bought Elvis' Gold Records Vol. 2 (U.K. version). I was desperate to hear A Fool Such As I again (possibly for the first time since 1959, when they used to play it loud, next door) so I played Side 2 first.

Out of the single mono speaker came the blast of "I Need Your Love Tonight" and the sheer exuberance of teenage love. Who cares if the lyrics are juvenile . . . so were the record buyers !! It's a fabulous recording.

Consider the lyrics of the much lauded "I Met Her Today" : the whole premise is barely credible, i.e. meeting someone once and proclaiming that she is the one above all others.


But he doesn't proclaim that in I Met Her Today. He says to his current girlfriend that he had told her if she kept cheating, he would go off and find someone else. Now he has, so she can get packing. Sounds about right to me (although slightly ironic given what would happen a decade later!)

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 3:06 am

poormadpeter2 wrote:This is certainly one that I thought serious about "tossing" in the what would you lose thread. It may have been a hit, and Garland's playing and Elvis's singing might be great, but it really is a stupid, infantile lyric that makes it no surprise that Elvis wanted to move away from rock n roll on his return from the army.


No argument about the stupid lyrics, but I can't say that I ever listen to Elvis for the lyrics...I listen to him for the sheer power of his voice, its conviction and pure beauty. That's why I can enjoy many of the silly soundtrack songs, and it's why I love INYLT. It's fun, it's energetic, it's joyous...and it's perfect.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 3:52 am

Thank you to whoever reported the above post before I did.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 4:02 am

fn2drive wrote:
poormadpeter2 wrote:Oh, I'm not denying the fact that it was typical of the time, just that they really now seem, to use your term, infantile. The same is true in some ways of I Got Stung and Wear My Ring Around Your Neck as well, although at least the former have the relative novelty of the bee metaphor. What rises these songs above the banal is the way that Elvis attacks them to a degree he hadn't attacked anything since Hound Dog two years earlier. But as pieces of material, they are pretty awful.


Ah the elitist strikes again. 3 classics of pure perfection so i'll go attack them but Padre now there's a classic for sure. Oh that 50s rock and roll-perfect for the proletariat but not for us academics. Think i'll go throw up on the Mona Lisa while i'm at it. ROTFL.


I wouldn't term "I Need Your Love Tonight" as "awful" if only for Elvis' superb vocal and Hank Garland's dynamic boogie lead guitar. But there's no argument that the shift from the aggressiveness of "Hound Dog" was apparent.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 4:20 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
fn2drive wrote:
poormadpeter2 wrote:Oh, I'm not denying the fact that it was typical of the time, just that they really now seem, to use your term, infantile. The same is true in some ways of I Got Stung and Wear My Ring Around Your Neck as well, although at least the former have the relative novelty of the bee metaphor. What rises these songs above the banal is the way that Elvis attacks them to a degree he hadn't attacked anything since Hound Dog two years earlier. But as pieces of material, they are pretty awful.


Ah the elitist strikes again. 3 classics of pure perfection so i'll go attack them but Padre now there's a classic for sure. Oh that 50s rock and roll-perfect for the proletariat but not for us academics. Think i'll go throw up on the Mona Lisa while i'm at it. ROTFL.


I wouldn't term "I Need Your Love Tonight" as "awful" if only for Elvis' superb vocal and Hank Garland's dynamic boogie lead guitar. But there's no argument that the shift from the aggressiveness of "Hound Dog" was apparent.


Nobody described the performance as awful, they described the song itself as awful.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 5:15 am

Could have been another number 1hit but the flip side kept it from it, and vice versa. Always been one of my all time favorites!

::rocks

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 6:06 am

Mike Windgren wrote:Hi there!! :D :D :D.

Great song but I prefer the other side: "A Fool Such As I". That´s a classic on the Elvis catalog! :smt020. Bye for now :smt006.



Image
A Fool Such as I/I Need Your Love Tonight. RCA Victor 47-7506. Released on March 10th,1959. Front cover.

Image
A Fool Such as I/I Need Your Love Tonight. RCA Victor 47-7506. Released on March 10th,1959. Super rare "Elvis-Sails" back cover.

P.S: The regular back cover of this 45 rpm, had a list of the current Elvis singles & eps.

Image
A Fool Such as I/I Need Your Love Tonight. RCA Victor 47-7506. Released on March 10th,1959. Regular back cover.


What a beautiful 45rpm.

Exactly what I mean when I say the 50's Elvis Presley is when it all mattered the most.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 6:29 am

Classic in every sense! Power and dynamic - vocal, guitar its all there.

Personally i don't see anything silly about the lyrics "the way you kiss swedee" - likes the way the swedee kisses, nothing wrong with that, "too good to miss, wowee" - can't beat a good kisser, wowee indeed.

Elvis is really into this song, love it when he shouts "yeah" as the guitar solo gets underway.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 6:33 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:It's notable that Elvis included this number in his live set in 1961. He must have liked it quite a bit.

Isn't it great to have this in his greatest live setlist and his greatest live show.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 6:38 am

poormadpeter2 wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
fn2drive wrote:
poormadpeter2 wrote:Oh, I'm not denying the fact that it was typical of the time, just that they really now seem, to use your term, infantile. The same is true in some ways of I Got Stung and Wear My Ring Around Your Neck as well, although at least the former have the relative novelty of the bee metaphor. What rises these songs above the banal is the way that Elvis attacks them to a degree he hadn't attacked anything since Hound Dog two years earlier. But as pieces of material, they are pretty awful.


Ah the elitist strikes again. 3 classics of pure perfection so i'll go attack them but Padre now there's a classic for sure. Oh that 50s rock and roll-perfect for the proletariat but not for us academics. Think i'll go throw up on the Mona Lisa while i'm at it. ROTFL.


I wouldn't term "I Need Your Love Tonight" as "awful" if only for Elvis' superb vocal and Hank Garland's dynamic boogie lead guitar. But there's no argument that the shift from the aggressiveness of "Hound Dog" was apparent.


Nobody described the performance as awful, they described the song itself as awful.

Who's they? Only you describe the song(s) as "awful" - your quote: "but as pieces of material, they are pretty awful". As songs there is nothing "awful" about Wear My Ring Around Your Neck, I Got Stung and I Need Your Love Tonight within its lyrical content.

Re: "I Need Your Love Tonight"

Tue Sep 27, 2016 7:04 am

poormadpeter2 wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
fn2drive wrote:
poormadpeter2 wrote:Oh, I'm not denying the fact that it was typical of the time, just that they really now seem, to use your term, infantile. The same is true in some ways of I Got Stung and Wear My Ring Around Your Neck as well, although at least the former have the relative novelty of the bee metaphor. What rises these songs above the banal is the way that Elvis attacks them to a degree he hadn't attacked anything since Hound Dog two years earlier. But as pieces of material, they are pretty awful.


Ah the elitist strikes again. 3 classics of pure perfection so i'll go attack them but Padre now there's a classic for sure. Oh that 50s rock and roll-perfect for the proletariat but not for us academics. Think i'll go throw up on the Mona Lisa while i'm at it. ROTFL.


I wouldn't term "I Need Your Love Tonight" as "awful" if only for Elvis' superb vocal and Hank Garland's dynamic boogie lead guitar. But there's no argument that the shift from the aggressiveness of "Hound Dog" was apparent.


Nobody described the performance as awful, they described the song itself as awful.


Please spare me. Every one of his comments is designed to thread the needle. Over and over there is the this and the that-all designed to later say I didnt say this or that. Awful um ok.

As for these 3 songs they are each classics. Surely not Hound Dog but when you talking a top 3 or better track out of his 711 masters, little could. Doc i agree on Elvis' vocal and Garland's playing clearly make all 3 special. And with all 3 he attacks them with gusto and delight. The outtakes on golden records 2 FTD are a simple delight and joy for those of us who enjoy out takes and thankfully there are plenty there before the censors get to them.