Dig deep into 70`s Elvis: the concerts, jumpsuits and all available live tapes.

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 5:21 am

The fool wrote:Opening night review by Ann Moses.


I have to quote a part from that newspaper :D
''It says B.S here, You think they're trying to tell me something? Maybe it stands for barbara streisand oh well..'' i love it :D

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 5:38 am

Something that should be pointed out regarding the Kingsley review. In the Kingsley review in Billboard magazine of the January 26, 1970 opening show, Kingsley erroneously refers to "Proud Mary" as "Lodi". There's also some errors in names in the January, 1969 article Kingsley wrote for the Memphis Commerical Appeal regarding Elvis recording at American. I believe he misspelled Lamar's last name and some of the musicians' names were misspelled.

I'm just pointing this out so that we don't take Kingsley's 1969 review as gospel that Elvis did "One NIght" on opening night. I believe doc has already pointed out some errors in the Kingsley 1969 review already. This may just be another error as far as "One Night."

Daryl

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 8:18 am

Daryl wrote:Something that should be pointed out regarding the Kingsley review. In the Kingsley review in Billboard magazine of the January 26, 1970 opening show, Kingsley erroneously refers to "Proud Mary" as "Lodi". There's also some errors in names in the January, 1969 article Kingsley wrote for the Memphis Commerical Appeal regarding Elvis recording at American. I believe he misspelled Lamar's last name and some of the musicians' names were misspelled.

I'm just pointing this out so that we don't take Kingsley's 1969 review as gospel that Elvis did "One NIght" on opening night. I believe doc has already pointed out some errors in the Kingsley 1969 review already. This may just be another error as far as "One Night."


What song might he be otherwise referring to?

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 8:23 am

The fool wrote:Opening night review by Ann Moses.


NO That`s All Right or One Night..interesting..

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 8:50 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:The point I emphasize is that Connolly's review is almost certainly from 8-01-1969 DS. Other, lesser Presley sites frame the review as his look at 7-31-1969 OS which is erroneous.

But we do have three reports from 7-31-1969 OS you need to analyze (Kingsley - Columbus/Tessum - Bingenheimer).


Ciscoking wrote:John,...please post the links all together..I missed the plot a bit..thank you..


James Kingsley
http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=54775

Columbus/Tessum
http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=59524

Bingenheimer
Not available online, reproduced in The Elvis Files Vol. 5 1969 - 1970.

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:14 am

Here's a review by Michael Ross of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner from August 12, 1969 Page C-7.

Elvis: An Artistic Renaissance
By Michael Ross
Herald-Examiner Staff Writer

LAS VEGAS - Elvis is back. He had been away.

Good music seems to be one thing that's left after life has moved on. Elvis Presley is a good musician, a great singer, and --quite possibly-- the most magnetic performer in the history of (what's commonly called) show biz.

If there had never been an Elvis Presley, certainly no one could have invented him. The emotional reaction to his first live appearance in nine years is akin to the way a St. Petersburg reporter described the chaotic aftermath of a Presley concert back in 1956: "The Pied Piper of rock 'n' roll, a swivel-hipped, leg-lashing entertainment bomb, blasted the downtown area into chaos all day yesterday.

"Screaming, fainting teenagers lined the streets early to catch a glimpse of Elvis Presley, a rock-billy gyrating singer who's shattered show business with his sultry style. He hit St. Petersburg with the effect of a small H-bomb, sending fans into mass hysteria and receiving an ovation rarely seen on the Suncoast."

Elvis was the symbol of anti-establishment behavior before Mario Savio had left grade-school. Some suggested he was a Communist plot.

But, for better or worse, he fathered a new art form in popular music called rock 'n' roll.

Back in 1956 [sic], Presley was studying to be an electrician. But, he remembers, "I got wired the wrong way." He caused a major squirmish when he appeared on the Ed Sullivan show. Then he went to Hollywood.

"My first movie ("Love Me Tender") was kind of wierd [sic]. But he persevered. "I made four more movies and then I got drafted."

When Elvis returned from the service, something had changed. The taut, casually sinister figure had rounded out. The exuberant spirit seemed to have atrophied. And his singing had become too jello-smooth for its own good. He went through an artistic Dark Age.

In his own words, "I got hung up in Hollywood, making pictures and got away from the people."

But now he is back.

Same swivel-hips. Same gyrations. Same emotional strangle-hold.

His victims are now 30-plus. Hardened waitresses, who just recently struggled through the ennuied debut of The Divine Barbra, were visibly swooning. A well attired matron scrambled on stage without once breaking stride and corralled the shy Presley.

And his artistry is undiminished. In fact, it seems even enhanced when compared to the rather-trendy impulse by some "to return to the roots of rock 'n' roll."

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:46 am

Here's another review by John L. Scott of the Los Angeles Times dated Saturday, August 2, 1969 Page 6 Part II.

John L. Scott

Subdued Presley Returns To Vegas


LAS VEGAS - Elvis Presley returned to the stage to do his thing at the International Hotel Thursday night after a decade devoted to recording and film activity. He sang a program made up mostly of his hits and received two standing ovations.

The black-haired daddy of the hard rock beat worked himself into a lather for more than an hour of belting 'em out and proved that when he sticks to his tried-and-true vocal style he's still able to rock an audience, even a sophisticated crowd of Las Vegas VIP's and hard-bitten press.

A ballad singer he isn't. While Presley, in his earlier days, used to send damsels into a frenzy with his wild gyrations, the more mature man now depends less on such goings on. In fact, during his initial show at the International, I detected nary a hip swivel.

Oh, he moves all right, but in a less frenetic fashion.

After a few tunes by four girls called the Sweet Inspirations and some engaging stand-up comedy by Sammy Shore, Elvis sauntered almost bashfully onto the stage without an introduction. He picked up his guitar and took off vigorously on "Blue Suede Shoes" while his many fans in the audience roared approval.

"I Got A Woman" kept the beat going, after which Presley tried a "soft" tune, "Love Me Tender," during which the large orchestra and eight backing singers gave him almost too much competition.

Then the singer's devotees were regaled with a medley that left their hearts happy and ears ringing - "Jailhouse Rock," "Don't Be Cruel," "Heartbreak Hotel," "All Shook Up," and "Hound Dog."

Needs Some Roadwork


It seemed apparent that Elvis needs some roadwork, as he came off this rip-snortling roundelay huffing and puffing. But after all this was only his third sustained effort in a dozen years. I don't believe he would be called on to keep up such a pace through five tunes in a recording studio or for a movie.

Elvis turned on his well wishers with a rendition of his newest recording, "In The Ghetto," did what he could with a quiet "Yesterday" and jumped headlong into something more his cup of tea, namely "Hey Jude." Another loud one, "Johnny B. Good" [sic] gave him more opportunity to rock the 2,000-seat theater-restaurant, after which he obliged with a few encores called for by avid ringsiders and took his two standing ovations with the proper humility.

Presley seemed to enjoy working to a live audience again. His comments between numbers were extremely casual and a bit difficult to hear where I sat. They were apparently pretty much off the cuff.

The star of the evening revealed an engaging personality laughing with the crowd during some inevitable first-night boo-boos and joking about being out of breath at times.

There were 2,000 people in the theater-restaurant and at least that many more waiting outside. Presley undoubtedly will play to capacity during his four-week stay at the International.

Comics Heroic Efforts

Comedian Shore worked heroically getting laughs from an audience that was there to see and hear E.P. his bull fighter routine is becoming a modern classic.

Presley held an after-midnight news conference and answered most questions with candor. He said "circumstances" finally gave him the opportunity to do a live engagement and that it was going to be the most exciting event of his life.

He said there was a possibility of his packaging his nightclub show for a tour.

Presley commented that he hoped to do movies with more storyline. "I'm tired of always singing to the guy I just beat up," he quipped.

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:50 am

Here's another remembrance, new to me, from Saturday Review critic Ellen Sander.


Elvis has Entered the Building

In that amazing summer of 1969, I was invited, as Saturday Review's rock critic, to Elvis Presley's debut performance at the International Hotel. I boarded Kirk Kerkorian's private jet with Nat Hentoff and other New York music critics and we flew to Las Vegas, stopping in L.A. to pick up Rodney Bingenheimer and others. I remember deplaning onto the tarmac into the oven of Vegas desert heat and wondering if I had somehow stepped into the jet's exhaust.

We went to the International Hotel, checked into our rooms and then I went out to see the pool. While I was lounging around, a violent wind came up and blew all the deck chairs, tables and shade umbrellas end over end around the pool area. People scattered, shrieking. Most of the deck furniture ended up in the pool.

Enough of the pool for me. I went back to my room and took a nap, which was a huge mistake. I slept and slept. Then, I got a call from an RCA records publicist, very worried why I wasn't "there." Egads. It was show time. Half asleep, I grabbed the clothes nearest me, my best hippie beaded and fringed jeans and a designer cowgirl shirt, never thinking I should have "really" dressed up. I ran downstairs to the showroom entrance where I found out what privilege really means. As I went through the crowd of dressed-to-the nines attendees, I approached the entrance, where a guard frowned at my get-up. He looked purposefully at an impeccably dressed, practically invisible security chief in the corner who gave a quick but definitive expressionless nod and they ceremoniously showed me in, bluejeans and all, carrying no ticket or invitation.

If there had been ten minutes to change, I would have given anything for it, but I wasn't going to miss the beginning of the show. History trumps vanity, according to my set of priorities. And I knew this was an historical event. I was beyond excited. What an opulent room. It was vibrating with expectation. Thankful for the darkness, I was shown to our ringside table, where I was seated next to Rex Reed, who looked at my outfit and winked. He just loved it. And I just loved him for it. What a sweet man. He was soon to be rewarded for his tolerance, understanding and admiration for quirkiness. He told me he was my fan. I was floored. But there wasn't much time to return his compliment.

The stage lit up. The Dixie Hummingbirds and the Sweet Inspirations began to sing. (Can you imagine them both together?) And with no introduction or fanfare whatsoever, not even a spotlight (!) The King his own self walked out on the stage and began to sing. When he finished, the audience exploded in applause and cheers. When the noise died down, Elvis put the microphone to his mouth, acknowledged his lusty admirers and then turned and took a step toward our table. He looked straight at Rex Reed and pointed. "I saw you on TV the other night," said Elvis Presley to Rex Reed and the world. Rex Reed leaned back in his seat, put his hands to his face and said, "Oh, my God, I think I'm going to die."

Elvis' performance was legendarily and extravagantly wonderful. It has been copiously described elsewhere, so I won't go into it here. I realized that if I lived long enough, all my wishes would come true. What I, or any young girl, would not have given in the nineteen fifties to see Elvis in person from the first row. At the time it wasn't as big a deal to me as a Who or a Rolling Stones concert, but in retrospect, the uniqueness of the event sits side by side with other peak experiences.

After the performance, we (the press and other invited guests) were herded into a nondescript room near the showroom, where Elvis gave an unannounced, but nonetheless triumphant, press conference. These are some of my never before published pictures from the 2x contact sheet of that delightful confab with an ebullient Elvis Presley.


SM_ELVIS.jpg


"Do you have to be as reclusive as you used to be?" I asked. He chortled and said "I'm not that reclusive, really, I'm just sneaky." One snotty woman asked "Do you dye your hair?" and Elvis answered "Oh, c'mon." I was lucky to get these pictures.

As if seeing Elvis were not enough, Ike and Tina Turner were playing the smaller lounge. What a show that was! Between you and I, I enjoyed it more than Elvis's show. I ended up reviewing the Turner's (Fussin' Fightin' and Carryin' On) album instead of the Elvis show in the next issue of Saturday Review. It wasn't that I was ungrateful (as extravagant a junket as that was, I never did reviews out of gratitude anyway). Rather, I felt the Turners were more a part of what was culturally important at the time. The rock audience would come to know Tina Turner as an unrelenting pop dynamo with more energy than any other ten acts put together, as well as the poster child for an abused wife and a woman who overcame adversity, to say nothing of an ageless wonder of timeless beauty and appeal. Eventually she would leave Ike behind, tour with The Rolling Stones, have her autobiography made into a major motion picture and headline her own major road shows. If you ask me, though, the show was better when Ike was running it.

Elvis Presley's re-emergence was news, it was exceptionally important and --arguably-- supreme entertainment. Some purists, in hindsight, thought it lacked the guts and gristle of the "real" Elvis and complained that the set relegated the older hits to medleys. Regardless of any of that, though, it just didn't fit in with the politics of my column as I saw it. Maybe if I had been a country music fan, I would have conceded that it was a culturally important event, but I wasn't. That was a my call and I stand by it. Elvis was a landscape-changing shockwave in the time of his initial emergence, but this redux, at least to me, did not contribute to nor did it materially affect the course and effect of the rock movement and the politics of the sixties. It could be argued that Presley himself wanted no part of it and more power to him---that was his call to make. In his sphere of influence, he ruled the roost. The once and future King.

Ellen Sander

http://www.ellensander.com/elvis.html

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Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:22 am

Here's another review by Myram Borders for United Press International (UPI). I've also included a link to the wikipedia page for Myram Borders.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myram_Borders


Elvis Swings Into Action in Vegas
By Myram Borders

ELVIS PRESLEY, the swivel-hipped country boy from Tennessee who tops all rock and roll singers in the money charts, opened a four-week show on the Las Vegas strip Thursday night --his first stage appearance in eight years.

The 34 year-old star, who has recorded more than 50 gold records, gyrated thru an hour and a half of his top selections backed by a 30-piece orchestra at the International hotel.

The entertainer wore a dark Edwardian style suit for his show, and when on stage had his hair combed forward. At a post-show news conference the hair-do was back to the conventional Presley slick-back style with the forelock.

Presley told the conference that he had been rehearsing diligently for his Las Vegas opening. He arrived about a week ago and has been working out his act daily. He still was practicing his routine until shortly before showtime in the 2,000-seat International room.

During the performance, Presley went thru 15 selections including some of his top records, "Blue Suede Shoes," "Love Me Tender," "Jailhouse Rock," "and "Heartbreak Hotel." he also strummed his guitar and slithered thru his recent recording, "In The Ghetto."

Presley received a standing ovation at the end of his performance. He was the second performer to appear at the International hotel since it opened July 2. Barbra Streisand was the first.

Presley reportedly is earning the same as Miss Streisand for appearing at the hotel. Her promoters said she was to receive a million dollars for three appearances over a three-year span.

[By United Press International]

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:31 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:Here's another remembrance, new to me, from Saturday Review critic Ellen Sander.


That's a fascinating piece, thanks for posting it.

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:34 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Daryl wrote:Something that should be pointed out regarding the Kingsley review. In the Kingsley review in Billboard magazine of the January 26, 1970 opening show, Kingsley erroneously refers to "Proud Mary" as "Lodi". There's also some errors in names in the January, 1969 article Kingsley wrote for the Memphis Commerical Appeal regarding Elvis recording at American. I believe he misspelled Lamar's last name and some of the musicians' names were misspelled.

I'm just pointing this out so that we don't take Kingsley's 1969 review as gospel that Elvis did "One NIght" on opening night. I believe doc has already pointed out some errors in the Kingsley 1969 review already. This may just be another error as far as "One Night."


What song might he be otherwise referring to?


To be honest, I don't know. I just don't put much faith in the guy's reviews if he routinely has errors with names of people, song titles, etc. I realize he was a local Memphis guy and that's likely how he was invited. He had interviewed Elvis back in March, '65, written the piece about him in January, '69 about recording at American and wrote reviews of Elvis' opening shows in July, 1969 and January, 1970 that were printed in Billboard magazine. I believe he was one of the first to break the news in Billboard about Elvis touring after the August / September, 1970 Las Vegas engagement.

Daryl

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 2:04 pm

Rodney Bingenheimer appears to be inconsistent with his listing of songs for July 31. In The Elvis Files Vol.5 he states that That's All Right was performed between 'I Got A Woman' and 'Love Me Tender'.

Yet, in Ken Sharp's Elvis '69 Bingenheimer replaces 'That's All Right' with 'One Night' and omits 'Can't Help Falling In Love' while the rest of the track listing remains identical.

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:37 pm

Here are the set lists by various reviewers.

The Concert Years book:
Opening Theme/
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can`t Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B. Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What’d I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

Written by Maria Columbus and Jeannie Tessum:
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Thats All Right Mama
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

Written by Ann Moses:
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

DEH wrote:this is Hopkins set list...

Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
-Band Intros-
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love



All have the same set list besides the second. It was published in a mag in 1983. Perhaps memory already faded when the review was done. All other reviewers just give us shortened set lists or add songs like One Night or Good Rockin Tonoght or Blue Moon Of Kenticky which most likely wrong info. What do you think ?
Last edited by Ciscoking on Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:08 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:38 pm

Jerry Hopkins saw the show and does not list "That's Alright Mama" or "One Night".

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:46 pm

DEH wrote:Jerry Hopkins saw the show and does not list "That's Alright Mama" or "One Night".


Thank you..this supports my thoughts about fading memory or mixing shows up..

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:54 pm

this is Hopkins set list...

Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
-Band Intros-
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:00 pm

if we never get a soundboard copy of the opening night show people can always collect the live recordings we have and edit them in the order he did them on opening night. Not the same but still... :D

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:10 pm

Thank you,..I added your review to my posting...all are identical but one song in the second review.

Anybody has more reviews or set lists from reviews..?...I think we are getting closer to the truth...great work guys..thank you so much... ::rocks

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:47 pm

Ciscoking wrote:Here are the set lists by various reviewers.

The Concert Years book:
Opening Theme/
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can`t Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B. Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What’d I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

Written by Maria Columbus and Jeannie Tessum:
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Thats All Right Mama
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

Written by Ann Moses:
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

DEH wrote:this is Hopkins set list...

Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
-Band Intros-
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love



All have the same set list besides the second. It was published in a mag in 1983. Perhaps memory already faded when the review was done. All other reviewers just give us shortened set lists or add songs like One Night or Good Rockin Tonoght or Blue Moon Of Kenticky which most likely wrong info. What do you think ?


I think doc made the same suggestion. Did Columbus and Tessum erroneously include "That's All Right" because it was actually done at the August 1, 1969 DS, which Columbus also attended? This would match nicely with the Ray Connolly review.

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Wed Feb 19, 2014 11:14 pm

Daryl wrote:
Ciscoking wrote:Here are the set lists by various reviewers.

The Concert Years book:
Opening Theme/
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can`t Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B. Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What’d I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

Written by Maria Columbus and Jeannie Tessum:
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Thats All Right Mama
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

Written by Ann Moses:
Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love

DEH wrote:this is Hopkins set list...

Blue Suede Shoes
I Got A Woman
Love Me Tender
Jailhouse Rock / Don't Be Cruel
Heartbreak Hotel
All Shook Up
Hound Dog
Memories
My Babe
I Can't Stop Loving You
In The Ghetto
Suspicious Minds
-Band Intros-
Yesterday / Hey Jude
Johnny B Goode
Mystery Train / Tiger Man
What'd I Say
Can't Help Falling In Love



All have the same set list besides the second. It was published in a mag in 1983. Perhaps memory already faded when the review was done. All other reviewers just give us shortened set lists or add songs like One Night or Good Rockin Tonoght or Blue Moon Of Kenticky which most likely wrong info. What do you think ?


I think doc made the same suggestion. Did Columbus and Tessum erroneously include "That's All Right" because it was actually done at the August 1, 1969 DS, which Columbus also attended? This would match nicely with the Ray Connolly review.


Where is written that Columbus attended the August 1, 1969 DS, too..? Then we`d had a reason to doubt his review or at least That`s All Right being sung at OS.

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:27 am

And there was no monologue on the opening night, according to this article by Ann Moses.
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Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:37 am

I was wondering..was there no band intro on opening night..?

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:54 am

Ciscoking wrote:I was wondering..was there no band intro on opening night..?


apparantly it turned out that elvis himself wasnt even there for opening night. :smt003

Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Thu Feb 20, 2014 2:42 am

According to this August 1969 article, from the German Bravo magazine, he sang In The Ghetto twice on Opening Night.
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Re: Opening night 1969 - reviews

Thu Feb 20, 2014 3:03 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
voldto wrote:http://www.elvis-collectors.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=59524

I transcribed what was written by Maria Columbus and Jeannie Tessum, submitted to Elvis Mail, the magazine of the official elvis presley fan club of great britain, issue october/november 1983 in that topic.

Then he did "I Got A Woman" , followed by "Thats All Right Mama"
Written by someone who was there.


Thanks for the reminder about Maria Columbus and Jeannie Tessum. In reading their article, it states their first reservation is for the next day, probably the 8-01-1969 DS. They only got access to the 7-31-1969 OS at the last second, not to mention the post-show press conference, which NME correspondent Ann Moses states was set up at the 11th hour, and almost no one in the media knew about it beforehand. So to pull it together and make such copious notes might be considered amazing indeed.

Is it possible that the highly-detailed set list they provided in 1983, over 14 years after the fact, is actually from that show? It neatly matches what journalist Ray Connolly details in his 1969 newspaper report.


This is what I was referring to. I would imagine like Doc said, if Columbus had reservations for the next day to see Elvis perform the day after the opening night show, she wasn't going to just cancel them because she got to see the opening night show as well. She's a super-fan of Elvis. This would neatly explain how "That's All Right" got mistaken for being listed in the 7-31-69 OS. Mistaken memory, that's all.