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It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 7:49 pm

I was with a friend last night at my local mall and went into a music store that sells cds of all artists, and while in there took a quick peak at the Elvis section. What I noticed disturbed me as a life long fan. All they had were compilations of greatest hits and live albums along with the Legacy sets. But when you take a look at that and then see other artists from the same era or modern day, you see a mixture of greatest hits and actual conceptual albums. So I got to thinking, why doesn't Sony upgrade the catalog with actual albums from sessions or certain period instead of these useless greatest hits compilations to make a few bucks here and there? Delete all of the current albums, or majority of, and the worthless greatest hits compilations with the exception of 30 Number One Hits and Second To None. If they went this route, they would end up selling much more than they do now and would draw more interest to Elvis THE ARTIST instead of just the icon. Here's a few ideas that would work.

1960-62. A best of the studio masters into one single album.
1963-65. A better representation of The Lost Album, newly mix and mastered.
1966-68. They actually did this in 199 with Tomorrow Is A Long Time. One of the finer albums in the catalog to date.
1969 Memphis sessions. A much needed single disc of the very best material from this legendary session, say 22 tracks max, newly mixed and mastered by a top named engineer and producer.
1970 in Nashville would be a fantastic follow-up to the Memphis sessions and draw new interest to the 70's Elvis.
1971-72. This should have been the real Burning Love album omitting the live tracks. Big mistake by RCA.
1973 Elvis At Stax. This is planned for August, but from my understanding the funkiest track ever cut at Stax by Elvis (If You Don't Come Back) is left off for God knows for what reason. Therefor killing the idea altogether.
1976. A comprehensive 17-track album of the complete Graceland masters would be a good way to best describe Elvis in his very last recording session of his life.

That's a total of 8 new album projects that would define the true essence of Elvis post the 50's and shine a light on his work and draw new earned respect from critics and the casual fans. As it is now, most think Elvis was some gimmick who only made soundtracks for mediocre to bad movies and concerts albums. If Sony were to go this route and do the above mentioned ideas, they would move a lot more units and we life long fans would finally get the music in a great presentation with a crisp clear sound and mix. Although they would have to put a little effort in PROMOTING the albums to the public by advertising them first. Something that they seem to not like to do when it comes to Elvis' new albums. :roll:

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 8:21 pm

SuspiciousMind wrote:I was with a friend last night at my local mall and went into a music store that sells cds of all artists, and while in there took a quick peak at the Elvis section. What I noticed disturbed me as a life long fan. All they had were compilations of greatest hits and live albums along with the Legacy sets. But when you take a look at that and then see other artists from the same era or modern day, you see a mixture of greatest hits and actual conceptual albums.


Like who?

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 8:30 pm

SuspiciousMind wrote:1969 Memphis sessions. A much needed single disc of the very best material from this legendary session, say 22 tracks max, newly mixed and mastered by a top named engineer and producer.

What? Again?

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 8:37 pm

How about a new remastering of the whole catalogue and bringing out an upgraded version of "The Complete Masters Set" for Clay to download? :lol:

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 8:41 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
SuspiciousMind wrote:I was with a friend last night at my local mall and went into a music store that sells cds of all artists, and while in there took a quick peak at the Elvis section. What I noticed disturbed me as a life long fan. All they had were compilations of greatest hits and live albums along with the Legacy sets. [color=#BF0000]But when you take a look at that and then see other artists from the same era or modern day, you see a mixture of greatest hits and actual conceptual albums.[/color]


Like who?


Well, we often mention Sinatra here for one reason or another, but his catalogue is certainly more sensibly maintained than Presley's. Nothing can be done about public domain companies, but the Columbia, Capitol and Reprise years have all original albums (with the exception of greatest hits and a couple of the pick-up albums) out on CD.

Bobby Darin, also from the Presley's period, is in a position where all but 1 of his albums have been on CD, and currently all but four are available.

All of Ricky Nelson's albums have been released on CD, and only a couple of exceptions are not out there today.

The same isn't true for Jerry Lee Lewis, but BGO records are slowly but surely releasing twofers of his Mercury and Smash recordings.

There also only very few original albums by Ray Charles that have yet to see the light of day on CD.

Johnny cash is in a position quite like Elvis, with his catalogue suffering from compilationitis, but at least the original albums are now all available in one reasonably priced boxed set, and the compilations do generally have a sensible theme.

I don't SuspiciousMind's solution is the way to go - it would simply add another handful of compilations to the 70+ available from Sony. In this current day and age, it's not even possible to cull a vast number of those 70 compilations as the harm has been done, and they will now always be present on the pages of Amazon, whether available new or secondhand.

That said, it is genuinely worrying that a significant number of original albums, good and bad, are not available at retail (or via Amazon etc). Even the worst of the soundtracks are still by the most important figure so far in popular music - that doesn't make them good, but it does give them some importance, and they should be out there.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:19 pm

SuspiciousMind wrote:
That's a total of 8 new album projects that would define the true essence of Elvis post the 50's ..:

and why only post(!!!!) 50s Elvis?

I mean..do you really think that the general listening non Elvis audience prefer your 17track album from 1976 with mostly maudlin ballads and several weak vocal performances over really shining performances from the 50s?
funny.

and shine a light on his work


so I guess the 1976 material shines more than any 50s compilation album.
cause his 50s work is essential and appealing to a general audience. well, not in your list.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 10:35 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
SuspiciousMind wrote:I was with a friend last night at my local mall and went into a music store that sells cds of all artists, and while in there took a quick peak at the Elvis section. What I noticed disturbed me as a life long fan. All they had were compilations of greatest hits and live albums along with the Legacy sets. [color=#BF0000]But when you take a look at that and then see other artists from the same era or modern day, you see a mixture of greatest hits and actual conceptual albums.[/color]


Like who?


Well, we often mention Sinatra here for one reason or another, but his catalogue is certainly more sensibly maintained than Presley's. Nothing can be done about public domain companies, but the Columbia, Capitol and Reprise years have all original albums (with the exception of greatest hits and a couple of the pick-up albums) out on CD.

Bobby Darin, also from the Presley's period, is in a position where all but 1 of his albums have been on CD, and currently all but four are available.

All of Ricky Nelson's albums have been released on CD, and only a couple of exceptions are not out there today.

The same isn't true for Jerry Lee Lewis, but BGO records are slowly but surely releasing twofers of his Mercury and Smash recordings.

There also only very few original albums by Ray Charles that have yet to see the light of day on CD.

Johnny cash is in a position quite like Elvis, with his catalogue suffering from compilationitis, but at least the original albums are now all available in one reasonably priced boxed set, and the compilations do generally have a sensible theme.

I don't SuspiciousMind's solution is the way to go - it would simply add another handful of compilations to the 70+ available from Sony. In this current day and age, it's not even possible to cull a vast number of those 70 compilations as the harm has been done, and they will now always be present on the pages of Amazon, whether available new or secondhand.

That said, it is genuinely worrying that a significant number of original albums, good and bad, are not available at retail (or via Amazon etc). Even the worst of the soundtracks are still by the most important figure so far in popular music - that doesn't make them good, but it does give them some importance, and they should be out there.

How many of the above can be found in the average cd-store-at-the-mall? I doubt very little. For example, the Ricky Nelson Imperial albums that were released on cd a dozen years ago NEVER turn up in cd stores today, unless they're in the used bin. Most of Rick's Decca albums never got a stateside CD release.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 11:15 pm

Lonely Summer wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
SuspiciousMind wrote:I was with a friend last night at my local mall and went into a music store that sells cds of all artists, and while in there took a quick peak at the Elvis section. What I noticed disturbed me as a life long fan. All they had were compilations of greatest hits and live albums along with the Legacy sets. [color=#BF0000]But when you take a look at that and then see other artists from the same era or modern day, you see a mixture of greatest hits and actual conceptual albums.[/color]


Like who?


Well, we often mention Sinatra here for one reason or another, but his catalogue is certainly more sensibly maintained than Presley's. Nothing can be done about public domain companies, but the Columbia, Capitol and Reprise years have all original albums (with the exception of greatest hits and a couple of the pick-up albums) out on CD.

Bobby Darin, also from the Presley's period, is in a position where all but 1 of his albums have been on CD, and currently all but four are available.

All of Ricky Nelson's albums have been released on CD, and only a couple of exceptions are not out there today.

The same isn't true for Jerry Lee Lewis, but BGO records are slowly but surely releasing twofers of his Mercury and Smash recordings.

There also only very few original albums by Ray Charles that have yet to see the light of day on CD.

Johnny cash is in a position quite like Elvis, with his catalogue suffering from compilationitis, but at least the original albums are now all available in one reasonably priced boxed set, and the compilations do generally have a sensible theme.

I don't SuspiciousMind's solution is the way to go - it would simply add another handful of compilations to the 70+ available from Sony. In this current day and age, it's not even possible to cull a vast number of those 70 compilations as the harm has been done, and they will now always be present on the pages of Amazon, whether available new or secondhand.

That said, it is genuinely worrying that a significant number of original albums, good and bad, are not available at retail (or via Amazon etc). Even the worst of the soundtracks are still by the most important figure so far in popular music - that doesn't make them good, but it does give them some importance, and they should be out there.

How many of the above can be found in the average cd-store-at-the-mall? I doubt very little. For example, the Ricky Nelson Imperial albums that were released on cd a dozen years ago NEVER turn up in cd stores today, unless they're in the used bin. Most of Rick's Decca albums never got a stateside CD release.


I don't think we can talk about CD stores any more as there are so few (although my local HMV in UK stocks a significant amount of the Sinatra and Ray Charles catalogue). But they are currently in print, and there is nothing stopping those Stateside importing them via amazon etc if they want them, or buying them secondhand (if that avoids shipping costs), in the same way that those of us in Europe have to buy in stuff from America that is not released here. The fact remains they are in print as stand alone albums (or twofers) in a way that Kissin Cousins, Speedway, Harum Scarum, Spinout and a batch of the 1970s albums are not when it comes to Elvis. And, in the case of the soundtracks I have mentioned, they have never been issued on CD in their original album format, let alone being available now.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 11:19 pm

matilda wrote:
SuspiciousMind wrote:
That's a total of 8 new album projects that would define the true essence of Elvis post the 50's ..:

and why only post(!!!!) 50s Elvis?

I mean..do you really think that the general listening non Elvis audience prefer your 17track album from 1976 with mostly maudlin ballads and several weak vocal performances over really shining performances from the 50s?
funny.

and shine a light on his work


so I guess the 1976 material shines more than any 50s compilation album.
cause his 50s work is essential and appealing to a general audience. well, not in your list.


The 50s stuff is more difficult. As the has been conceded on here in the past, it simply doesn't sell as well as the 1968-77 material. The best RCA material in the 50s is bundled up on the Legacy edition of the first album. That leaves the soundtrack material from the 50s which should, and could, be put together as a double disc package (and quite why it hasn't been is anybody's guess). Besides that, there are relatively few tracks left out when one takes into account the Gold Records series which are available individually or as a boxed set for about £15.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Fri Jun 28, 2013 11:24 pm

Lonely Summer wrote:How many of the above can be found in the average cd-store-at-the-mall? I doubt very little. For example, the Ricky Nelson Imperial albums that were released on cd a dozen years ago NEVER turn up in cd stores today, unless they're in the used bin. Most of Rick's Decca albums never got a stateside CD release.


All very true. Which goes back to my original query to "SuspiciousMind" -- who are these artists with all the amazing CD collections in the "local mall"?

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 1:27 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Lonely Summer wrote:How many of the above can be found in the average cd-store-at-the-mall? I doubt very little. For example, the Ricky Nelson Imperial albums that were released on cd a dozen years ago NEVER turn up in cd stores today, unless they're in the used bin. Most of Rick's Decca albums never got a stateside CD release.


All very true. Which goes back to my original query to "SuspiciousMind" -- who are these artists with all the amazing CD collections in the "local mall"?


If you must know, the artists I was referring to was basically ALL artists.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 2:44 am

SuspiciousMind does have a point, certainly going by the shops in the UK. The Elvis section is just cluttered up with endless banal compilations as opposed to original albums, and that's not just referring to PD releases. Elsewhere, I can go to the Sinatra section and choose from 20 original albums in my local store, which also stocks the aforementioned Nelson releases (albeit on a rota basis, but they are there). Likewise, the Ray Charles section today contained around a dozen original albums, with the Cash section containing roughly the same. The problem with the Elvis catalogue is that there are more compilations out there than original albums. Add to that the problem that three or four issues of the same album are all available at the same time in many cases (at least three releases of Aloha and On Stage are currently available, not counting boxed sets), and the poor people buying stock at local stores must wonder where to start.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 3:02 am

SuspiciousMind wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Lonely Summer wrote:How many of the above can be found in the average cd-store-at-the-mall? I doubt very little. For example, the Ricky Nelson Imperial albums that were released on cd a dozen years ago NEVER turn up in cd stores today, unless they're in the used bin. Most of Rick's Decca albums never got a stateside CD release.


All very true. Which goes back to my original query to "SuspiciousMind" -- who are these artists with all the amazing CD collections in the "local mall"?


If you must know, the artists I was referring to was basically ALL artists.


Really? That is some "local mall."

Frankly, it's obvious you did not visit any mall. Thanks.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 3:16 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
SuspiciousMind wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Lonely Summer wrote:How many of the above can be found in the average cd-store-at-the-mall? I doubt very little. For example, the Ricky Nelson Imperial albums that were released on cd a dozen years ago NEVER turn up in cd stores today, unless they're in the used bin. Most of Rick's Decca albums never got a stateside CD release.


All very true. Which goes back to my original query to "SuspiciousMind" -- who are these artists with all the amazing CD collections in the "local mall"?


If you must know, the artists I was referring to was basically ALL artists.


Really? That is some "local mall."

Frankly, it's obvious you did not visit any mall. Thanks.


It's obvious that you're an obnoxious arrogant idiot too. FYI, the store was a MUSICAL store at a mall. How about minding your own personal business and not act like a total jackoff. Thanks.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 3:17 am

poormadpeter wrote:SuspiciousMind does have a point, certainly going by the shops in the UK. The Elvis section is just cluttered up with endless banal compilations as opposed to original albums, and that's not just referring to PD releases. Elsewhere, I can go to the Sinatra section and choose from 20 original albums in my local store, which also stocks the aforementioned Nelson releases (albeit on a rota basis, but they are there). Likewise, the Ray Charles section today contained around a dozen original albums, with the Cash section containing roughly the same. The problem with the Elvis catalogue is that there are more compilations out there than original albums. Add to that the problem that three or four issues of the same album are all available at the same time in many cases (at least three releases of Aloha and On Stage are currently available, not counting boxed sets), and the poor people buying stock at local stores must wonder where to start.



For once, we agree on something. Firs time for everything.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 3:35 am

SuspiciousMind wrote:It's obvious that you're an obnoxious arrogant idiot too. FYI, the store was a MUSICAL store at a mall. How about minding your own personal business and not act like a total jackoff. Thanks.


I do not find your story credible, and such replies indicate I am correct.

Have fun!
Last edited by drjohncarpenter on Sat Jun 29, 2013 4:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 3:36 am

poormadpeter wrote:SuspiciousMind does have a point, certainly going by the shops in the UK. The Elvis section is just cluttered up with endless banal compilations as opposed to original albums, and that's not just referring to PD releases. Elsewhere, I can go to the Sinatra section and choose from 20 original albums in my local store, which also stocks the aforementioned Nelson releases (albeit on a rota basis, but they are there). Likewise, the Ray Charles section today contained around a dozen original albums, with the Cash section containing roughly the same. The problem with the Elvis catalogue is that there are more compilations out there than original albums. Add to that the problem that three or four issues of the same album are all available at the same time in many cases (at least three releases of Aloha and On Stage are currently available, not counting boxed sets), and the poor people buying stock at local stores must wonder where to start.

Franks and Nelsons are there collecting dust because they are not sold out like Presley's.

Here in the states there are numerous places that stock Elvis' original LP CD's but they are hard to come by because -----> PEOPLE BUYS THEM...aka... SOLD OUT! :roll:

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 4:25 am

If only SuspiciousMind was managing the catalogue, if only.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 4:33 am

Suspiciousmind must be another one here that is obsessed with Graceland sessions.
People quit obsessing over 1976/1977 era!

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:08 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
SuspiciousMind wrote:It's obvious that you're an obnoxious arrogant idiot too. FYI, the store was a MUSICAL store at a mall. How about minding your own personal business and not act like a total jackoff. Thanks.


I do not find your story credible, and such replies indicate I am correct.

Have fun!


So you don't believe that I went to my local mall? Really? You're a piece of work.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:09 am

ritchie valens wrote:Suspiciousmind must be another one here that is obsessed with Graceland sessions.
People quit obsessing over 1976/1977 era!


What gives you that impression? Just because I included his last session? It's not like I said they should re-release Elvis In Concert with a picture of the Omaha show on the cover. :roll:

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:26 am

SuspiciousMind wrote:So you don't believe that I went to my local mall? Really? You're a piece of work.

You're changing the subject. What is not credible in your story is that EVERY artist had a decent catalogue selection in the racks.

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:47 am

Matthew wrote:
SuspiciousMind wrote:So you don't believe that I went to my local mall? Really? You're a piece of work.

You're changing the subject. What is not credible in your story is that EVERY artist had a decent catalogue selection in the racks.


You miss the point of what I was saying. Apparently your language isn't English. But from the ones that I viewed they all had a more balanced selection of REAL albums compared to that of Elvis. How hard is that to understand?

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:54 am

Why is everyone so aggressive on here? Does anyone get along?

Re: It's past time for a major catalog upgrade

Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:58 am

SuspiciousMind wrote:
Matthew wrote:
SuspiciousMind wrote:So you don't believe that I went to my local mall? Really? You're a piece of work.

You're changing the subject. What is not credible in your story is that EVERY artist had a decent catalogue selection in the racks.


You miss the point of what I was saying. Apparently your language isn't English. But from the ones that I viewed they all had a more balanced selection of REAL albums compared to that of Elvis. How hard is that to understand?

I think he is meaning --> WHO?
Because Elvis' 80+ LP releases from 56-77 is kind of hard to compare with everyone else's library of maybe 10-15. How do you balance that?