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Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:17 pm

Leiber and Stoller have written arguably the best rock and roll songs in history, rivaled only by Lennon/McCartney IMO. Which brings us to Three Corn Patches. Fans usually mock this song. While it is not up to par with their other material, is it really that bad of a song or is it Elvis, with one of the worst vocal of his career that makes it seem worse than it is? Picture the song being recorded in 1957 or 1960 and you may get what I mean. Even though it still would not be a classic , I believe if it was recorded at the same time as Dirty, Dirty Feeling (also not a classic) it would have fared much better. What do others think?

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:32 pm

I love 'Three Corn Patches'. Great back beat. The only negative aspect is the words which are not really suitable for Elvis. Leiber and Stoller certainly wrote many classic rock 'n' roll songs.

Brian

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:34 pm

Lennon/Mc Cartney did not write may rock´n roll songs, but they wrote a lot of pop songs.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:36 pm

I enjoy three corn patches, i never skip it.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:37 pm

samses wrote:Lennon/Mc Cartney did not write may rock´n roll songs, but they wrote a lot of pop songs.


I do not agree. It all falls under the umbrella of rock and roll which if you look at the Hall Of Fame, now includes rappers and pop stars like Madonna. The Beatles were certainly more rock and roll than most of the artists that have been inducted lately and they were certainly singing more rock and roll than Elvis was in the 60's.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:38 pm

r&b wrote:Leiber and Stoller have written arguably the best rock and roll songs in history, rivaled only by Lennon/McCartney IMO. Which brings us to Three Corn Patches. Fans usually mock this song. While it is not up to par with their other material, is it really that bad of a song or is it Elvis, with one of the worst vocal of his career that makes it seem worse than it is? Picture the song being recorded in 1957 or 1960 and you may get what I mean. Even though it still would not be a classic , I believe if it was recorded at the same time as Dirty, Dirty Feeling (also not a classic) it would have fared much better. What do others think?


It's not a top-shelf Leiber and Stoller song, and both the 1973 vocal and arrangement at the Elvis session does it no favors.


T-Bone Walker's original 1973 cut is better, enjoy a sample --> HERE.


T-Bone Walker - Three Corn Patches
http://www.poplartunes.nl/three_corn_patches.html

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:46 pm

I for myself had never a problem with the album Raised On Rock. So I like the song.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:49 pm

It is an awful recording. Elvis is out of breath throughout the song. He doesn't seem to be interested in recording it either. I can imagine Felton saying, "It's a gas, Elvis."

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:53 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:It's not a top-shelf Leiber and Stoller song, and both the 1973 vocal and arrangement at the Elvis session does it no favors.

BINGO!

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:53 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
r&b wrote:Leiber and Stoller have written arguably the best rock and roll songs in history, rivaled only by Lennon/McCartney IMO. Which brings us to Three Corn Patches. Fans usually mock this song. While it is not up to par with their other material, is it really that bad of a song or is it Elvis, with one of the worst vocal of his career that makes it seem worse than it is? Picture the song being recorded in 1957 or 1960 and you may get what I mean. Even though it still would not be a classic , I believe if it was recorded at the same time as Dirty, Dirty Feeling (also not a classic) it would have fared much better. What do others think?


It's not a top-shelf Leiber and Stoller song, and both the 1973 vocal and arrangement at the Elvis session does it no favors.


T-Bone Walker's original 1973 cut is better, enjoy a sample --> HERE.


T-Bone Walker - Three Corn Patches
http://www.poplartunes.nl/three_corn_patches.html


Sure is a better arrangement.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:54 pm

Posted the information below before, but it's some cool background on where Elvis found "Three Corn Patches." Sadly, this may well be the final Leiber and Stoller song Presley ever cut in a studio. Is that all there is? I guess so.

At the 1973 Stax sessions, Elvis cut "If You Don't Come Back," "Three Corn Patches" and "Just A Little Bit" in July, all of which had just been cut by T-Bone Walker in a June date produced by Leiber and Stoller. All three would be slotted on Walker's double LP:


731020_Reprise 6483_01.JPG
731020_Reprise 6483_02.JPG
T-Bone Walker, Very Rare (Reprise 2XS 6483, October 20, 1973)
Note: Backing vocals were provided by the Sweet Inspirations!

Side 1
1. Striking On You, Baby (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
2. Please Send Me Someone To Love (Percy Mayfield)
3. Brother Bill (The Last Clean Shirt) (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Evening (Harry White, Mitchell Parish)
5. The Come Back (L. C. Fraser)

Side 2
1. Your Picture Done Faded (Paul Howard)
2. Don't Give Me The Run Around (T-Bone Walker)
3. Hard Times (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Everyday I Have The Blues (Peter Chatman)
5. Person To Person (Charles Singleton, Teddy McRae)

Side 3
1. Fever (Eddie Cooley, John Davenport)
2. Three Corn Patches (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
3. I'm Still In Love With You (T-Bone Walker)
4. Just A Little Bit (Earl Washington, John Thornton, Pitney Brown, Ralph Bass)
5. James Junior (Charles Otis)

Side 4
1. Been Down So Long (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
2. If You Don't Come Back (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
3. Kansas City (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Well, I Done Got Over It (Eddie "Guitar Slim" Jones)
5. Stormy Monday (T-Bone Walker)


Walker's album was not issued until October:


Billboard - Oct 27 1973 p64.JPG
Billboard - October 27, 1973


Elvis' album with his recordings was out only two weeks after T-Bone's set:


Billboard - Nov 10 1973 p76.JPG
Billboard - November 10, 1973
Note: Review of Presley LP reads in part that "The raucous edge is gone from his voice."


Unlike Raised On Rock, Very Rare was an ambitious record:

This release, one of the last recordings put down by T-Bone Walker two years before his death, is exceptional by design alone.

Produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, these 20 tracks were recorded in 1973 with the A-line of early 70's LA session players, quite a number of sidemen already major jazz artists themselves, a big band horn-section and The Sweet Inspirations as the vocal backing.

Musicians like Wilton Felder, Michael Omartian, James Booker, Jom Gordon, Dean Parks and Larry Carlton are heard together with jazz-legends like Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Zoot Sims, Al Cohn, Herbie Mann and blues singer Charles Brown is heard on piano only.

Throughout the 20 tracks the musicians are shuffled from track to track, which actually makes the records more equal than one could expect - but unfortunately also equally neat, more blues by definition than by feeling.

Here again with a horn section - as he often was on his 50s Imperial recordings - one could have hoped for more of that receipt, slow, toned and soaked in brass, but instead of a late-night club feeling, you end up with a feeling just as was the most likely the atmosphere during recordings: blues by broad daylight.

Impressive credits though.

http://www.discogs.com/T-Bone-Walker-Very-Rare/release/2091488

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Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 8:59 pm

r&b wrote:Leiber and Stoller have written arguably the best rock and roll songs in history, rivaled only by Lennon/McCartney IMO. Which brings us to Three Corn Patches. Fans usually mock this song. While it is not up to par with their other material, is it really that bad of a song or is it Elvis, with one of the worst vocal of his career that makes it seem worse than it is? Picture the song being recorded in 1957 or 1960 and you may get what I mean. Even though it still would not be a classic , I believe if it was recorded at the same time as Dirty, Dirty Feeling (also not a classic) it would have fared much better. What do others think?


I think it is an average song with an average delivery. I do not dislike it but dont find it on my turntable too often. Of course raised on rock has strange lyrics for Elvis....

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:05 pm

The song itself is not that bad. Elvis' delivery leaves a lot to be desired. Had he been a little more focused and committed to the song, such as he was on say...."Cindy Cindy" (another fun song) in June 1970, it may be received a little better than it is.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 9:10 pm

samses wrote:Lennon/Mc Cartney did not write may rock´n roll songs, but they wrote a lot of pop songs.


Nah. Their catalog is filled to the brim with incredible rock 'n' roll songs, as befitting the #1 rock 'n' roll group of all time.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:01 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
r&b wrote:Leiber and Stoller have written arguably the best rock and roll songs in history, rivaled only by Lennon/McCartney IMO. Which brings us to Three Corn Patches. Fans usually mock this song. While it is not up to par with their other material, is it really that bad of a song or is it Elvis, with one of the worst vocal of his career that makes it seem worse than it is? Picture the song being recorded in 1957 or 1960 and you may get what I mean. Even though it still would not be a classic , I believe if it was recorded at the same time as Dirty, Dirty Feeling (also not a classic) it would have fared much better. What do others think?


It's not a top-shelf Leiber and Stoller song, and both the 1973 vocal and arrangement at the Elvis session does it no favors.


T-Bone Walker's original 1973 cut is better, enjoy a sample --> HERE.


T-Bone Walker - Three Corn Patches
http://www.poplartunes.nl/three_corn_patches.html


Nice post!
Didn't know that original version, sounds quite cool.
I've never been too happy with Elvis' version. EP's vocal bothers me here..

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:04 pm

Robert wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
r&b wrote:Leiber and Stoller have written arguably the best rock and roll songs in history, rivaled only by Lennon/McCartney IMO. Which brings us to Three Corn Patches. Fans usually mock this song. While it is not up to par with their other material, is it really that bad of a song or is it Elvis, with one of the worst vocal of his career that makes it seem worse than it is? Picture the song being recorded in 1957 or 1960 and you may get what I mean. Even though it still would not be a classic , I believe if it was recorded at the same time as Dirty, Dirty Feeling (also not a classic) it would have fared much better. What do others think?


It's not a top-shelf Leiber and Stoller song, and both the 1973 vocal and arrangement at the Elvis session does it no favors.


T-Bone Walker's original 1973 cut is better, enjoy a sample --> HERE.


T-Bone Walker - Three Corn Patches
http://www.poplartunes.nl/three_corn_patches.html


Nice post!
Didn't know that original version, sounds quite cool.
I've never been too happy with Elvis' version. EP's vocal bothers me here..


You're most welcome. It's always nice to share what we know. ;-)

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:06 pm

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Last edited by Juan Luis on Mon Sep 15, 2014 5:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:14 pm

r&b wrote:
samses wrote:Lennon/Mc Cartney did not write may rock´n roll songs, but they wrote a lot of pop songs.


I do not agree. It all falls under the umbrella of rock and roll which if you look at the Hall Of Fame, now includes rappers and pop stars like Madonna. The Beatles were certainly more rock and roll than most of the artists that have been inducted lately and they were certainly singing more rock and roll than Elvis was in the 60's.


Rock and Roll was a marketing term. You can call it what you want; Rock, Pop, It's music with a beat.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:41 pm

It's not a Presley classic, for sure, but the full ending is the point at which the performance comes to life: it's a shame the official master was edited.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:00 pm

samses wrote:Lennon/Mc Cartney did not write may rock´n roll songs, but they wrote a lot of pop songs.


Three Corn Patches is the worst song EP recorded. Its so bad, it could have been written by lennon/mccartney.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:06 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:Posted the information below before, but it's some cool background on where Elvis found "Three Corn Patches." Sadly, this may well be the final Leiber and Stoller song Presley ever cut in a studio. Is that all there is? I guess so.

At the 1973 Stax sessions, Elvis cut "If You Don't Come Back," "Three Corn Patches" and "Just A Little Bit" in July, all of which had just been cut by T-Bone Walker in a June date produced by Leiber and Stoller. All three would be slotted on Walker's double LP:


731020_Reprise 6483_01.JPG
731020_Reprise 6483_02.JPG
T-Bone Walker, Very Rare (Reprise 2XS 6483, October 20, 1973)
Note: Backing vocals were provided by the Sweet Inspirations!

Side 1
1. Striking On You, Baby (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
2. Please Send Me Someone To Love (Percy Mayfield)
3. Brother Bill (The Last Clean Shirt) (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Evening (Harry White, Mitchell Parish)
5. The Come Back (L. C. Fraser)

Side 2
1. Your Picture Done Faded (Paul Howard)
2. Don't Give Me The Run Around (T-Bone Walker)
3. Hard Times (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Everyday I Have The Blues (Peter Chatman)
5. Person To Person (Charles Singleton, Teddy McRae)

Side 3
1. Fever (Eddie Cooley, John Davenport)
2. Three Corn Patches (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
3. I'm Still In Love With You (T-Bone Walker)
4. Just A Little Bit (Earl Washington, John Thornton, Pitney Brown, Ralph Bass)
5. James Junior (Charles Otis)

Side 4
1. Been Down So Long (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
2. If You Don't Come Back (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
3. Kansas City (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Well, I Done Got Over It (Eddie "Guitar Slim" Jones)
5. Stormy Monday (T-Bone Walker)


Walker's album was not issued until October:


Billboard - Oct 27 1973 p64.JPG
Billboard - October 27, 1973


Elvis' album with his recordings was out only two weeks after T-Bone's set:


Billboard - Nov 10 1973 p76.JPG
Billboard - November 10, 1973
Note: Review of Presley LP reads in part that "The raucous edge is gone from his voice."


Unlike Raised On Rock, Very Rare was an ambitious record:

This release, one of the last recordings put down by T-Bone Walker two years before his death, is exceptional by design alone.

Produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, these 20 tracks were recorded in 1973 with the A-line of early 70's LA session players, quite a number of sidemen already major jazz artists themselves, a big band horn-section and The Sweet Inspirations as the vocal backing.

Musicians like Wilton Felder, Michael Omartian, James Booker, Jom Gordon, Dean Parks and Larry Carlton are heard together with jazz-legends like Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Zoot Sims, Al Cohn, Herbie Mann and blues singer Charles Brown is heard on piano only.

Throughout the 20 tracks the musicians are shuffled from track to track, which actually makes the records more equal than one could expect - but unfortunately also equally neat, more blues by definition than by feeling.

Here again with a horn section - as he often was on his 50s Imperial recordings - one could have hoped for more of that receipt, slow, toned and soaked in brass, but instead of a late-night club feeling, you end up with a feeling just as was the most likely the atmosphere during recordings: blues by broad daylight.

Impressive credits though.

http://www.discogs.com/T-Bone-Walker-Very-Rare/release/2091488



In 1973, for those of us who were around & into Elvis then, we all heard about a new rock/blues album Elvis was planning to cut. There was even an article in Elvis Monthly about it and we were all hoping for another album like FEIM after several years of lackluster albums. Well Raised On Rock came out and we all went huh? I can only imagine if the T-Bone Walker album had become the Elvis album with L&S producing. It would have been a reuniting of genius on all sides, but would Elvis have been up to the task? Perhaps if he reached out to Jerry & Mike it could have happened. Only Elvis was going to make a project like this happen as L&S were done with Parker's bulls#) many years before and would never approach the Presley team again. If only, if only, if only. Words used too often to describe Elvis' career.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:10 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:It's not a top-shelf Leiber and Stoller song, and both the 1973 vocal and arrangement at the Elvis session does it no favors.

T-Bone Walker's original 1973 cut is better…


I have no argument with this assessment; but I will note that, while T-Bone Walker had the original release, the song had actually been recorded earlier by O. C. Smith with the Count Basie Band in a Frank Foster arrangement. Unfortunately, the recording was unissued, and the acetate has been lost; I don't know if Foster's chart still exists. I'll also note that Walker was near the end of his life at the time of the Very Rare sessions, and had very little voice left. The only other versions I've heard are amateur recordings by Elvis tribute artists.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:35 pm

PStoller wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:It's not a top-shelf Leiber and Stoller song, and both the 1973 vocal and arrangement at the Elvis session does it no favors.

T-Bone Walker's original 1973 cut is better…


I have no argument with this assessment; but I will note that, while T-Bone Walker had the original release, the song had actually been recorded earlier by O. C. Smith with the Count Basie Band in a Frank Foster arrangement. Unfortunately, the recording was unissued, and the acetate has been lost; I don't know if Foster's chart still exists. I'll also note that Walker was near the end of his life at the time of the Very Rare sessions, and had very little voice left. The only other versions I've heard are amateur recordings by Elvis tribute artists.


What a shame that acetate is lost. O.C. Smith had a great voice. Always nice to see you here, Peter!

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:47 pm

I also like Three Corn Patches,I have played it frequently,along with Find Out Whats Happening and If you don't Come Back.The only songs on Raised On rock that I am not crazy about are Girl Of Mine and Sweet Angeline.

Re: Three Corn Patches - really that bad?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 11:53 pm

While the song is probably not worthy of a single release, I like the song. It's just a fun, non-complicated song which musically appeals to me. Obviosuly, the song was never meant to be a rock 'n' roll classic.

rlj