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Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:36 pm

An excellent account of the impact Elvis had on the black community, and how he loved all people regardless of color, as documented here in these interviews in this awesome video.


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Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:14 pm

Excellent videos - thanks for highlighting them.

I especially loved Stevie Wonder's words ("caucasion brother"), Early Wrights view that Elvis could have fitted in with a particular group of singers, Bobby Womack's admiration, Three 6 Mafia's incorporation of In the Ghetto into Hip Hop to show Elvis could speak for African-Americans, Myrna Smith on what Elvis said in Texas, and Chuck Berry's clear statement.

It's a shame the two videos have been viewed only 1600 or 9000 times.
Last edited by Suds on Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:46 pm

Excellent viewing. Many thanks.

Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Thu Feb 14, 2013 3:23 am

Steve Morse wrote:Excellent viewing. Many thanks.

Youre welcome Steve.

Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Thu Feb 14, 2013 8:08 am

Great stuff..... ALWAYS great to see positive concerning Elvis and how he treated All people. If he were in any way bigoted it would certainly show; you can't hide that stuff. You can please some of the people some of the time, and there are some who will refuse to like you no matter what. Too bad more people can't be as accepting.

Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:12 pm

This version has been updated from the original documentary. I like very much what has been added. It definitely needs more views. If you're on FB or Twitter, spread it around! :D

Also: tumblr, blogs, etc.!

(thumbs up)

rjm

Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Thu Feb 14, 2013 5:05 pm

rjm wrote:This version has been updated from the original documentary. I like very much what has been added. It definitely needs more views. If you're on FB or Twitter, spread it around! :D

Also: tumblr, blogs, etc.!

(thumbs up)

rjm



I agree it needs to be spread around. Most black folks still buy into the Chuck D non-sense, unfortunately. Actually alot of people ignorantly push the "Elvis stole the black man's music" narrative. Makes my blood boil.

Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Thu Feb 14, 2013 5:11 pm

Great stuff, thanks promiseland!!

Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Fri Feb 15, 2013 7:53 pm

We all know from facts and recollected stories by those all around him that he was not in any way a racist. Every black person who ever worked with or for him, knew him or even met him personally has never had a bad thing to say about him, his music or his character. It's always praise and respect. The hip-hop culture has brainwashed young people to believe that he was racist or made the rumored shoe-shine comment, which we all know that he did not.

The problem really began as far back as the late 60's when groups like The Black Panthers came onto the scene and preached that the white man was the devil. Therefor Elvis would be the scapegoat in their attacks. Then hip-hop continued the ignorance and bigotry.

E.P.E. hasn't made it any better with the way that they have marketed, or should I say, refused to market Elvis towards the African-American community over the years. The only thing black about Graceland is the workers and staff. They have virtually ignored the influence that the blues and black culture had on Elvis' life and his music and style. But we know why too. Because the mass majority of visitors are not black and they cater to the majority even if the minority is omitted. It's all about one color. Not black or white. But about green, as in money.

But E.P.E. could change that and quickly. What they should do is include the roots of Elvis beyond just a mention here and there. There should be a permanent exhibit at Graceland covering the influence that black culture had on him. That's what makes him look like a thief more than anything. There's no coverage when they visit. How are young people of color supposed to believe that he wasn't a racist or thief if they're not shown any proof?

I will say though that in the past few years, E.P.E. is trying to reach the African-American community little by little and have even used black families visiting Graceland for advertisement. They recently as of last year, began honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr's birthday on their official site in the News section. That's at least a positive start. And more and more black families and young adults are visiting Graceland, even in rough economic times. So it's time for E.P.E. to start catering to them as well.

A friend and I were talking with the Graceland project manager during Elvis Week and we pitched an idea to him about them adopting the name 'Shake Rag' (the black community that Elvis grew up in as a child and first heard the blues in Tupelo) and developing an Elvis-themed blues cafe where it plays nothing but his blues and R&B music throughout his career. And is decked out with photos of Elvis and famous African-Americans. They thought it was a great idea and would consider it during their next board meeting for new projects. We'll see if it comes becomes a reality or just pushed under the rug like in the past.

Re: Elvis & The Black Community-That Echo Will Never Die

Sat Feb 16, 2013 12:01 am

Panthers? That would be historically incorrect, whatever you think of the politics.

http://books.google.com/books?id=NqCQo9nqVHYC&pg=PA7&lpg=PA7&dq=Eldridge+Cleaver+on+Elvis&source=bl&ots=BE2nnd1rjL&sig=L9YZfXDYSZ_8oCn1589U7IB3ceU&hl=en&sa=X&ei=5KAeUb6LLcG1iwLn_IDwDQ&ved=0CCMQ6AEwAQ

Eldridge Cleaver's well-known commentary, of course.

As I recall, The Rumor got a real second wind after he died. And then Chuck D. did what he did.

BTW, I love your Shake Rag idea!! That would be awesome. But also must be handled with care: middle class blacks are often sensitive in being reminded of the bad old days.

And when Elvis first arrived in Tupelo proper, it was because of dire circumstances. East Tupelo was already poor, so to be living on the fringes of a beleaguered black community by the tracks . . . hated by the whites over on the west side, is not a jolly story. They didn't even move to "Mill Town" (to the south east of Tupelo proper) then, so even THOSE whites would have looked at the Presleys in a very negative light. And, thus, this only highlights how blacks were viewed.

To romanticize poverty is not what they need to do, nor "teach" blacks about their roots. But, yes, Shake Rag should be appreciated. {sigh}

So, care must be taken so as not to suggest: "Come see when Elvis and family were SO bad off, they lived with YOU!" That's a danger.

It's been a problem with historical films: a lot of contemporary black folks feel shamed by the past. Don't like to see such films in a theater.

None of this is easy. But EPE must act any event.

rjm

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