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Re: Trying To Get To You

Sat Jan 19, 2013 6:17 am

While I enjoy Elvis' rendition of this song from 1968,I still favor the original studio version from 1955.

If I remember correctly, some accounts of Elvis' Sun recording career indicate that it would have been Elvis' next single on Sun had he continued on that label. While that could be a bit of revisionist history, one has to wonder if the song might not have made a dent nationally, especially given the success that artists like Bill Haley and Pat Boone were having with covers of R&B tunes.

"Tryin' To Get To You" wasn't as genre-shattering as "Heartbreak Hotel", but perhaps it could have been a pop hit for Elvis in 1956, especially if it had been promoted via a television appearance.

Re: Trying To Get To You

Sat Jan 19, 2013 2:10 pm

Rtn 2 Sndr wrote:While I enjoy Elvis' rendition of this song from 1968,I still favor the original studio version from 1955.

If I remember correctly, some accounts of Elvis' Sun recording career indicate that it would have been Elvis' next single on Sun had he continued on that label. While that could be a bit of revisionist history, one has to wonder if the song might not have made a dent nationally, especially given the success that artists like Bill Haley and Pat Boone were having with covers of R&B tunes.

"Tryin' To Get To You" wasn't as genre-shattering as "Heartbreak Hotel", but perhaps it could have been a pop hit for Elvis in 1956, especially if it had been promoted via a television appearance.

The last Sun Session, which was held on the 30th Oct, 1955. Was with the sole purpose of releasing a 6th Sun single. Both Elvis and Sam felt strongly about "Tryin' To Get To You", which was recorded earlier in the year 21st July, 1955 at the same session as "Baby Let's Playhouse". But they needed a B-Side...Sam apparently, suggested Billy Emerson's classic, which sam always loved, "When It Rains It Really Pours", which Elvis also loved. It's still not sure which was the intended A-Side.

But that day, was a particularly tense day for everyone in the tiny Sun Studio, as Elvis' contract with Sun Records was about to expire. And Elvis' signing over to RCA was very much on everyone's mind, that Elvis was leaving the label for good. So Elvis did a few takes of the classic, "When It Rains It Really Pours" the session broke down and that was the end of his time at Sun Records. :(

Re: Trying To Get To You

Sat Jan 19, 2013 9:12 pm

Blue River wrote:
Matthew wrote:
Tony.. wrote:The "Live on stage in Memphis" version can be best appreciated on the bootleg CD "Fifth time around". The FTD version was ruined with fake audience overdubs as you pointed out, plus overdone reverb on Elvis' voice.

Do you even own the FTD? There are no 'fake audience overdubs' on the FTD version. The 'fake audience overdubs' are on the original 1974 album.

Tony.., I was wondering the same thing that Matthew has asked you.

It's okay to admit that you made a mistake. I certainly hope you don't want to argue about the FTD release. However, now you have me curious about the "Fifth Time Around" boot (which I don't have).

For anyone who does have it - Is there anything outstanding about the sound on it compared to other releases of the same concert?


This was reviewed and discussed in detail when it came out. "Fifth time around" is not only unedited, it also doesn't have annoying 'swimming pool' reverb on Elvis' voice as applied to the FTD version and there is more depth / clarity to the drums. Just listen to the first minute or so of the "Trying to get to you" songs on both versions as a comparison.

Re: Trying To Get To You

Sun Jan 20, 2013 12:11 am

Superb song indeed. If I had to choose the highlight of Elvis's career, the 1968 version would be very strong candidate.

Re: Trying To Get To You

Sun Jan 20, 2013 2:23 am

mysterytrainrideson wrote:Oh yes, forgot all about the "Legendary Performer" LP...remember it being on there, which is were i first heard it. The best performance of the show and they don't include it in the final cut for TV in '68. :cry:


Director Steve Binder did include it in his original 90-minute show edit, but NBC did not believe one star could carry that time slot without guests, so he had to cut it back to a 60-minute edit.