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Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Thu Jan 10, 2013 9:33 pm

A. C. van Kuijk wrote: In his final years Elvis was an oldies-act.


Elvis was never an oldies act.

Chuck Berry was and still is an oldies act and so is Jerry Lee Lewis.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Thu Jan 10, 2013 11:23 pm

mysterytrainrideson wrote:Also, in the 70's, they screamed for what he once stood for and not for the performance he was giving at the time. So sad!!!

Did you see Elvis in the '70s? I did, and I disagree with your statement. Have you heard some of the ovations he got for the '70s songs he was doing? Listen to An American Trilogy from Atlanta on May 2, 1975 and tell me they did not scream for the performance he was giving at the time. Have you heard him doing Bridge Over Troubled Water both in Vegas and on the road and heard the ovation he was getting? How about How Great Thou Art? When he did the reprise a time or two, were they applauding for what he once was? Nonsense. Have you listened to America The Beautiful from the Rockin' Across Texas FTD release? When I saw him in Louisville in May '77, they were talking about My Way and Hurt before he ever took the stage. They were hoping like hell that he would perform them both that night (he did).

Trust me. They applauded (and screamed) for the performance he was giving at the time.
Last edited by Rob on Thu Jan 10, 2013 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Thu Jan 10, 2013 11:35 pm

brian wrote:
A. C. van Kuijk wrote: In his final years Elvis was an oldies-act.


Elvis was never an oldies act.

Chuck Berry was and still is an oldies act and so is Jerry Lee Lewis.


I agree about Chuck, but JLL probably had more country hits than rock hits. He is an oldies act for a few classics but most of his show is country (or was when I saw him in the 80's).

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 12:15 am

r&b wrote:
brian wrote:
A. C. van Kuijk wrote: In his final years Elvis was an oldies-act.


Elvis was never an oldies act.

Chuck Berry was and still is an oldies act and so is Jerry Lee Lewis.


I agree about Chuck, but JLL probably had more country hits than rock hits. He is an oldies act for a few classics but most of his show is country (or was when I saw him in the 80's).


But he did do some of those old oldies package tours with Chuck Berry and Little Richard in the 70s.

His new material that he's coming out with now is Jerry Lee doing covers of songs from the 50s to the 70s.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 12:25 am

Elvis' songs were not in American Graffiti because the licensing fee RCA wanted was too high. This is the same reason Elvis' hits were never on the oldies compilations of the era.

Somebody must have liked Elvis in the 1970s being that he charted more records in the decade than any artist in any decade and when everything was said and done was probably the decade's top record seller. And this was oldies and contemporary material. While the oldies of Chuck Berry needed to be peddled with the hits of other artists in the era to make a huge sales impact, a 1973 television album of Elvis' hits from 1956 to 1962 sold an astonishing five million units. Meanwhile Elvis' contemporary record Aloha From Hawaii made number one the same year and was the first album in the Quadrophonic format to move one million units, eventually on its way to five million units. Somebody must have liked him. 1971's Elvis Sings the Wonderful World of Christmas three million units. 1972's Elvis as Recorded at Madison Square Garden three million. Burning Love and Hits from His Movies two million. Aloha five million. Compare that to the pittance sold by Berry and Lewis.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 1:35 am

Rob wrote:
mysterytrainrideson wrote:Also, in the 70's, they screamed for what he once stood for and not for the performance he was giving at the time. So sad!!!

Did you see Elvis in the '70s? I did, and I disagree with your statement. Have you heard some of the ovations he got for the '70s songs he was doing? Listen to An American Trilogy from Atlanta on May 2, 1975 and tell me they did not scream for the performance he was giving at the time. Have you heard him doing Bridge Over Troubled Water both in Vegas and on the road and heard the ovation he was getting? How about How Great Thou Art? When he did the reprise a time or two, were they applauding for what he once was? Nonsense. Have you listened to America The Beautiful from the Rockin' Across Texas FTD release? When I saw him in Louisville in May '77, they were talking about My Way and Hurt before he ever took the stage. They were hoping like hell that he would perform them both that night (he did).

Trust me. They applauded (and screamed) for the performance he was giving at the time.


Spot On, well said.

likethebike wrote:Elvis' songs were not in American Graffiti because the licensing fee RCA wanted was too high. This is the same reason Elvis' hits were never on the oldies compilations of the era.

Somebody must have liked Elvis in the 1970s being that he charted more records in the decade than any artist in any decade and when everything was said and done was probably the decade's top record seller. And this was oldies and contemporary material. While the oldies of Chuck Berry needed to be peddled with the hits of other artists in the era to make a huge sales impact, a 1973 television album of Elvis' hits from 1956 to 1962 sold an astonishing five million units. Meanwhile Elvis' contemporary record Aloha From Hawaii made number one the same year and was the first album in the Quadrophonic format to move one million units, eventually on its way to five million units. Somebody must have liked him. 1971's Elvis Sings the Wonderful World of Christmas three million units. 1972's Elvis as Recorded at Madison Square Garden three million. Burning Love and Hits from His Movies two million. Aloha five million. Compare that to the pittance sold by Berry and Lewis.


Spot on as well.
It seems many are making flipant comments without sufficient knowledge of what was.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:28 am

likethebike wrote:Elvis' songs were not in American Graffiti because the licensing fee RCA wanted was too high. This is the same reason Elvis' hits were never on the oldies compilations of the era.

Somebody must have liked Elvis in the 1970s being that he charted more records in the decade than any artist in any decade and when everything was said and done was probably the decade's top record seller. And this was oldies and contemporary material. While the oldies of Chuck Berry needed to be peddled with the hits of other artists in the era to make a huge sales impact, a 1973 television album of Elvis' hits from 1956 to 1962 sold an astonishing five million units. Meanwhile Elvis' contemporary record Aloha From Hawaii made number one the same year and was the first album in the Quadrophonic format to move one million units, eventually on its way to five million units. Somebody must have liked him. 1971's Elvis Sings the Wonderful World of Christmas three million units. 1972's Elvis as Recorded at Madison Square Garden three million. Burning Love and Hits from His Movies two million. Aloha five million. Compare that to the pittance sold by Berry and Lewis.


Of course, his death gave him his bigggest sales since the 50's. Please be reasonable here. Elvis was not selling more records before he died than say Elton John or others. Those numbers you quote, many of those sales were posthumous.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:33 am

Well said likethebike and Rob.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:49 am

Also,he charted so many records because there were so many records released. His catalog was always flooded as it still is today. When all those records chart. of course his number of chartered records appear more than an artist who may release an album every other year. The numbers you quote on sales are not initial sales, (Im sure The WW of Christmas did not sell that much when released) but accumulative sales years later. Believe me, Elvis was not a popular record seller in the 70's. I worked part time in a store. Other than Aloha and Burning Love, the only records folks showed any interest in was The Sun Sessions in 1976. Of course after he died, sales exploded on all of them.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:58 am

r&b wrote:, Elvis was not a popular record seller in the 70's. I worked part time in a store. Other than Aloha and Burning Love, the only records folks showed any interest in was The Sun Sessions in 1976. Of course after he died, sales exploded on all of them.


Elvis sold more records than that though.

MSG, On stage and a few others did very well at the time.

You also have to take into consideration that after Aloha Elvis recorded more country type material and so he appealed more to that market.

Elvis sold well in the 1970s considering that it was his third decade in the business.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 3:40 am

The Christmas record had racked over 400,000 sales by 1972 according to Ernst. This is an impressive number being that the Christmas season is only five weeks long. Its lack of chart performance was solely due to the fact that Billboard segregated Christmas releases from the regular chart in this era. MSG was certified Gold almost over night. Aloha From Hawaii was a number one album. Its initial sales ranking in the 2 million range. The BL and hits from his movies 750,000. It would, like all of the Camdens, obtained a much higher chart position were it not for its low list price. The TV LP sold its millions mostly between 1973 and 1977. Elvis' death was only icing on the cake. The Legendary Performer sets again sold 750,000 in their first runs. By releasing so many LPs one could argue that Elvis cut into his own sales potential by not leaving any particular LP with enough time to rack up significant sales. Elvis-That's the Way it is and Elvis Country were released six weeks apart and yet both achieved Gold status prior to Elvis' death.The bottom line is that Elvis was selling in the hundreds of thousands and millions of units and scoring chart singles and LPs and Berry and Lewis were most decisively not.

If you take Elvis' cumulative album ansd single sales from 1970 to 1976, without the TV sales, he moved more than 25 million units domestically alone, and that's supposing that an LP like MSG sold nothing after its initial run and that his still available back catalog sold nothing either. It's worth noting that other highly certified albums like the Eagles' Greatest Hits racked up most of their tally after the 1970s as well.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Fri Jan 11, 2013 5:21 am

I remember reading somewhere that Elvis was the #1 seller of records in the 50's. Number 2 record seller in the 60s behind the Beatles and #3 in the 70s.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Sun Sep 22, 2013 3:58 pm

likethebike wrote:The Christmas record had racked over 400,000 sales by 1972 according to Ernst. This is an impressive number being that the Christmas season is only five weeks long. Its lack of chart performance was solely due to the fact that Billboard segregated Christmas releases from the regular chart in this era. MSG was certified Gold almost over night. Aloha From Hawaii was a number one album. Its initial sales ranking in the 2 million range. The BL and hits from his movies 750,000. It would, like all of the Camdens, obtained a much higher chart position were it not for its low list price. The TV LP sold its millions mostly between 1973 and 1977. Elvis' death was only icing on the cake. The Legendary Performer sets again sold 750,000 in their first runs. By releasing so many LPs one could argue that Elvis cut into his own sales potential by not leaving any particular LP with enough time to rack up significant sales. Elvis-That's the Way it is and Elvis Country were released six weeks apart and yet both achieved Gold status prior to Elvis' death.The bottom line is that Elvis was selling in the hundreds of thousands and millions of units and scoring chart singles and LPs and Berry and Lewis were most decisively not.

If you take Elvis' cumulative album ansd single sales from 1970 to 1976, without the TV sales, he moved more than 25 million units domestically alone, and that's supposing that an LP like MSG sold nothing after its initial run and that his still available back catalog sold nothing either. It's worth noting that other highly certified albums like the Eagles' Greatest Hits racked up most of their tally after the 1970s as well.


God bless you likethebike !!!

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Sun Sep 22, 2013 4:27 pm

minkahed wrote:
likethebike wrote:The Christmas record had racked over 400,000 sales by 1972 according to Ernst. This is an impressive number being that the Christmas season is only five weeks long. Its lack of chart performance was solely due to the fact that Billboard segregated Christmas releases from the regular chart in this era. MSG was certified Gold almost over night. Aloha From Hawaii was a number one album. Its initial sales ranking in the 2 million range. The BL and hits from his movies 750,000. It would, like all of the Camdens, obtained a much higher chart position were it not for its low list price. The TV LP sold its millions mostly between 1973 and 1977. Elvis' death was only icing on the cake. The Legendary Performer sets again sold 750,000 in their first runs. By releasing so many LPs one could argue that Elvis cut into his own sales potential by not leaving any particular LP with enough time to rack up significant sales. Elvis-That's the Way it is and Elvis Country were released six weeks apart and yet both achieved Gold status prior to Elvis' death.The bottom line is that Elvis was selling in the hundreds of thousands and millions of units and scoring chart singles and LPs and Berry and Lewis were most decisively not.

If you take Elvis' cumulative album ansd single sales from 1970 to 1976, without the TV sales, he moved more than 25 million units domestically alone, and that's supposing that an LP like MSG sold nothing after its initial run and that his still available back catalog sold nothing either. It's worth noting that other highly certified albums like the Eagles' Greatest Hits racked up most of their tally after the 1970s as well.


God bless you likethebike !!!


Ain't that the truth. I miss that man and the class and knowledge he brought to our forum and the Elvis world in general.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Tue Oct 08, 2013 4:30 am

Ive been reading these posts and had to add my 2 cents. I was a teen in the early seventies in both Texas and Canada we had 50's days in both junior high and high school. Yes Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee were both considered fairly cool amonst all of us. We had a 50's band in high school and played many gigs including all the Chuck,Jerry Lee and Elvis songs. American Graffitti was huge and the people wanted to see the 50's originals. That's what Rick Nelson's song Garden Party is about. He was doing modern stuff at a 50's revival show and he got booed off the stage. I saw all the 50's performers back in the 70's. I think Elvis was considered more of a MOR performer sort of like Dean Martin,Jones,Humperdink,etc. I saw him in Vegas so of course the crowd was different. He was still the King and the best I have ever seen, but different than the raw 50's guys. :)

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Wed Oct 09, 2013 4:46 am

Fairchild1171 wrote:"Elvis didn't have this crowd"


Yeah, Elvis had about 15,000 more at most of his concerts than what JLL had at this concert. At the end of EIC you can see two young girls 15? 18? crying like babies.


Hip teens and twenty somethings were few and far between at most Elvis concerts. There were some teens and twenties but not very many and they were more straight laced than the hippie crowds you see at this rock and roll revival concert. I know with my friends and kids I went to school with in the 70's, Chuck Berry was more popular than Elvis. I saw Chuck Berry live in the late 70's and although he played a theater, the audience was almost all white teens and twenty somethings.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:02 am

C'mon man. Chuck Berry and JLL more popular with young people than Elvis? There were plenty of twenty somethings at Elvis' shows. I was amongst them. The fact there were all ages there meant his appeal was broad. Give me a break. Elvis coming to town was an event.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Wed Oct 09, 2013 8:45 am

Age is not the only demographic difference you notice. Or that I noticed. While you can't tell from looking at people what their socioeconomic status is, of course, you make some educated guesses. And it jumps out, to me.

Look at how they are dressed. Look at the hairstyles. That's about all you can go on, aside from their apparent age. They are hipsters, and that often adds the element of social class into the demographic mix. Kids who were townies, instead of college students, would have to wear their hair cut "clean" for their jobs. And their clothing would also reflect that decision, and that they didn't always have the funds for the latest styles. And Elvis's shows were very affordable, too. Jerry's in a tux: looks like a "classy" show and venue.

I would say there were plenty of young people in Elvis's audience, but a lot of them didn't always "look" young. A tougher life ages a person, and also keeps them from having too much free time to keep up with all that is hip. If you look at Elvis's fans, and listen to what they say, you can see that the concert they are attending is a BREAK from their everyday lives that they really waited for, and for which sacrificed certain things. They didn't "know" they weren't hip. They just weren't. Also, poorer people, working people tend to marry younger, and have children younger - the works. Playtime is over, early.

Does anyone notice this, or does it hit you at all? These are middle class young adults, free to be . . . whatever they wanted to be. Elvis didn't necessarily attract that demographic, and it's one reason why he is still so loved by the same demographic who attended his shows. (There are exceptions, of course. At the Garden, it was a hipper crowd.) One look at the candlelight vigil, and that ought to be clear: those are not former hipsters (or "hippies," if you will). These are working people, broken down by life: some find it difficult to walk because they're now sick - and before their time.

There is much to understand about Elvis's audience, not just "age."

rjm

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Wed Oct 09, 2013 5:18 pm

Younger crowd -- when I was in my teens, I saw Elvis 20 times, and my brother David, 16 years old when Elvis died -- 10 times.

Re: Elvis didn't have this crowd

Thu Oct 10, 2013 10:29 am

stevelecher wrote:C'mon man. Chuck Berry and JLL more popular with young people than Elvis? There were plenty of twenty somethings at Elvis' shows. I was amongst them. The fact there were all ages there meant his appeal was broad. Give me a break. Elvis coming to town was an event.


Yes Elvis coming to town was an event; FOR ADULTS! I'm not saying that there were no young people at Elvis shows in the 70's but they were in the minority. The young people who WERE there were more straight laced and not as hip as the ones you see in the rock and roll revival film. You wouldn't find them at a Led Zeppelin concert. Now I'm talking in generalities. I was at 2 Elvis concerts in the 70's. One at 12 and one at 15 and I saw Led Zeppelin. Those 2 Elvis shows I saw, the majority of the audience was my parents age, in their late 30's to early 40's.