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Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:25 am

The sound quality of the show is amazing. I had it cranked in the car.

There is a truly charming moment, during Love Me Tender, when Elvis recognizes his former employers, Crown Electric's Mr. & Mrs. Tipler. Elvis greets them warmly, and Mrs. Tipler exclaims, "That's my boy!" Very sweet.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:51 am

elvisjock wrote:The sound quality of the show is amazing. I had it cranked in the car.

There is a truly charming moment, during Love Me Tender, when Elvis recognnizes his former employers, Crown Electric's Mr. & Mrs. Tipler. Elvis greets them warmly, and Mrs. Tipler exclaims, "That's my boy!" Very sweet.


The same thing happened at the August 22, 1969 DS -- Gladys and Jim Tipler were there and Elvis saw them.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:58 am

And even though it was probably a little "tongue-in-cheek," there was something touching about the way Elvis said to them "Thanks for the job." It seemed oddly sincere.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 5:29 am

srlogicom wrote:And even though it was probably a little "tongue-in-cheek," there was something touching about the way Elvis said to them "Thanks for the job." It seemed oddly sincere.


Elvis' sincerity was most evident in the first moment of recognition. "Hallo Miz Tipler!"

The Tiplers were in the house, way back at the first Eagle's Nest gigs. They were obviously proud of their boy.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 6:55 am

elvisjock wrote:The sound quality of the show is amazing. I had it cranked in the car.

There is a truly charming moment, during Love Me Tender, when Elvis recognizes his former employers, Crown Electric's Mr. & Mrs. Tipler. Elvis greets them warmly, and Mrs. Tipler exclaims, "That's my boy!" Very sweet.



I quite agree elvisjock. In addition to being a super show, Elvis brings a really classy moment by introducing the Tiplers. He seems to appreciate how they reached out to him during those humble years.

rlj

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 10:33 am

:lol: Just had a chance to listen to this release today. Its EXACTLY as 'good' as Rock Legend said a while ago. The sound on the 'good' 12/8/72 D/S IS improved and a pleasure to hear.... Yes he runs through a list of his 'hits' in a perfunctary way but otherwise its a strong show.The rehearsal is 'simply great' always a DREAM to listen to any unheard rehearsals!~ :D
i like the way he's still joking a bit and changing words during 'until its time for you to go' and a surprizingly good 'burning love' with a reprise ending- yet he didn't perform it in his show.!'youv'e lost that loving feeling ' IS a full blooded version and very good! most part of rest of the rehearsal is very good too~!blueberry hill being another clear 'highlight' :D after version #2 of my way we get the dialogue heard b4 on another bootleg release after this song...... so this version has been heard b4 great release in good listenable sound i am going to be playing a lot this week THANKS ERNST~! :smt007

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 10:35 am

elvisjock wrote:There is a truly charming moment, during Love Me Tender, when Elvis recognizes his former employers, Crown Electric's Mr. & Mrs. Tipler. Elvis greets them warmly, and Mrs. Tipler exclaims, "That's my boy!" Very sweet.

Elvis thanking them for the job is humorous -- and classy.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 10:42 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:The same thing happened at the August 22, 1969 DS -- Gladys and Jim Tipler were there and Elvis saw them.

A wonderful moment available on FTD's In Person release. I love how Elvis' demeanor changes from showman to old friend.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 11:31 am

RonBaker2003 wrote:I hope it's the one from July31/August 1, 1973. Take a look at the list of songs on that one!!!


Forget it. The remaining rehearsals obtained from Don Lance are reportedly just more of the same (also from 08/72) with no real surprises.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:13 pm

Rock Legend wrote:
RonBaker2003 wrote:I hope it's the one from July31/August 1, 1973. Take a look at the list of songs on that one!!!


Forget it. The remaining rehearsals obtained from Don Lance are reportedly just more of the same (also from 08/72) with no real surprises.

well thats 'ok' Rock Legend.... :wink:
Elvis in August 1972 was in top form so i have Zero problem with hearing 'more of the similar' type of rehearsals!~ :D
This release is being 100% ENJOYED by me this week and a reason why i am still a FTD collector..... more of similar is quite ok in my book!~ :smt007

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:59 pm

r&b wrote:
GuitarKing wrote:No I'm not bored with those oldies, Elvis was, and he didn't like doing them so he'd rush thru it or just mumble the words to get it over then he should have switch it. That all I'm saying.



'I am not in the least bit ashamed of Hound Dog and Heartbreak Hotel' So says Elvis at the MSG press conf, yet he performed them terribly with no respect. If you saw any of the 12-12-12 concert, you saw performers twice Elvis' age giving their 'oldie' standard songs the full monty. No excuse.


First of all, 12/12/12 was a special event so of course they are performing with with the "full monty"! He obviously didn't like Don't Be Cruel and Teddy Bear any more and you remember Elvis saying he didn't want to be 40, up on stage singing Hound Dog. The only reason he kept doing them is that they were fan favorites and got great crowd reaction. There was also the fear of being seen as just an oldies act. He didn't want to be like Chuck Berry and other had become and just be an oldies act that just comes out and sings their past hits the same way they were done 20 years earlier. Elvis wanted to be a current artist and if he had his way, he probably would have never performed any of those 50's songs again! There really isn't the "oldies" stigma with most of the current artists anymore.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 9:59 pm

I was able to sit down and give this package a propper listen & look... It is pure class all around! GOOD JOB FTD TEAM!

JEFF d
EP fan

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Tue Jan 01, 2013 10:02 pm

I, too think that it is almost a close up..very well done and carefully researched..

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 12:10 am

HoneyTalkNelson wrote:
likethebike wrote:I'm not sure a nearly 70 year old man "rocking" out on something like "Jumping Jack Flash" is the height of dignity. What sense of menace does a 70-year-old bring to "Jumping Jack Flash"? What sense does it make for a 70 year old multi-millionaire to sing a song like "Satisfaction" (not performed at 12-12-12) other than audiences overwhelmingly, desperately wanting to witness the iconic image of the Rolling Stones singing their most famous song? That's an important thing and it's great they give the effort, but inherently that man on that stage could not possibly represent the lyrics in that song. He is old, he has had his every desire in his lifetime satiated. (These concerns apply less to Springsteen because so many of his songs deal with adult concerns or are direct narrative tales.) Mick Jagger and that song do not go together anymore and they haven't for decades. That's kind of the contradiction that Elvis was dealing with in the 1970s with his 1950s hits. He's not 21 anymore, yet he's iconic for these songs and they must be performed even if he doesn't relate to them anymore. Maybe these other performers have found a better middle ground, but it's not as if there were not a legitimate dilemma. If you think about it, a 70 year old Mick Jagger prowling around the stage like he's the hot young wolf is kind of an absurd and pitiful figure. If any of us engaged in the same sort of age inappropriate behavior we would be pilloried. It's not that you should fold up and die or surrender life when you get old, but at minimum you should have learned something. Mick Jagger trying to perform "Satisfaction" the way he did when he was 25 shows us he's gained what exactly?

"Hound Dog" is a perfect example of the dilemma Elvis as the first rocker to maintain a career in the mainstream faced. Elvis initially added the song as a burlesque, a joke, a bit of on stage fun. His outrageous performance on the Milton Berle Show, the performance of a young iconoclast, made sense for a guy who's making his mark by tearing up the system that previously had shut him out. It also demanded a record. The Steve Allen incident added another layer- anger. That force of nature that's on record is a large result of that anger. So what you have is a number added to the show as a bit of fun, a bit of outlandish farce and made into a record very much the sign post of one moment in the singer's life. The record performance is immortalized and frozen in time. (By that I don't mean bound by time, but the same forever and ever.) The singer is very clearly not. So it's a dilemma you have an iconic record and you have a singer who no longer has the power to deliver that song the way he did when he was 21. But it must be performed. Did Elvis want to be 70 years old and still swinging his hips to "Hound Dog" or did he see that as an indignant fate? It's a very important question and it's one that's too often ignored. An important element in the later Elvis' show- and Elvis himself mentioned this in his relatively few press conferences- was to demonstrate that he was not the same man he was in 1956. He had grown, he had learned, he had changed. Maybe sometimes your audience has to move with you.

I interviewed Billy Vera awhile back and he made an interesting comment to me. He said that the 1950s rockers at least wanted to grow up while the '60s rockers acted as if you could stay young forever. I think Elvis' later show, for all its imperfections, was a reflection of that desire, the idea that you couldn't, or more importantly, shouldn't rock forever. In the rock music choices that Elvis made in the 1970s you can at least see that these lyrics relate to a middle aged man. You still get horny. You still have a past, and the country is still full of possibilities as reflected in Berry's "Promised Land." But how many 40-year-olds feel comfortable asking to be someone's teddy bear?

Now this is not to excuse the fact that Elvis, for whatever reason, had a relatively short attention span. He constantly needed new input and new challenges to perform at his peak. Of course, this is another argument against some of the old songs. What did "Don't Be Cruel" have new to offer Elvis?

On some of the tracks, though, other types of context are extremely relevant. In a show that Elvis has decided- again for better or worse- to make about sensory overload, what role does a song like "In the Ghetto" play? And when Elvis is singing 20 songs a night does he really want to tear up his voice with "If I Can Dream?"

The song listing thing is made too much of anyway. He kept the lineup because it worked and there's something like 200 songs that were performed live between 1969 and 1977. That's a big catalog. The intent was not for folks to listen to 100 or 200 shows. If you listened to the half dozen or so (save EIC) that Elvis released in that time, complaints are few.


One of the most informative posts I have ever read on this site.

EXCELLENT work and I agree 100%!

Bob




Did Elvis want to be 70 years old and still swinging his hips to "Hound Dog" or did he see that as an indignant fate? It's a very important question and it's one that's too often ignored.



Elvis answered this himself when he said that he didn't want to be up on some stage at 40 singing Hound Dog. At his College Park concert in 1974, he announces to the crowd right before Hound Dog, "I dread this dude, I dread this song with a passion!" He then goes on to say that it's because he's afraid of ripping his suit but I think that was a quick save to edit what he just said and was really feeling.

Also concerning his lackluster singing of these songs: when you get a huge audience reaction to a half assed performance, why perform it with any more effort?

True music artists that still feel that they have something to say don't want to keep singing songs they can no longer relate to. A few years ago Bowie announced he was no longer going to perform his back catalogue. I don't know if he's kept to that but he obviously had more and new things to say and was tired of retreading his past work. The acts that have nothing more to say are the ones that just become purely oldies acts that come out, sing their hits and leave.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 12:30 am

Had Elvis actually written his songs, I think he would have treated even the oldies with respect. He didn't have the emotional connection to Don't Be Cruel, that McCartney might have with I Want To Hold Your Hand.

He was entitled to his feelings about them. If he wanted to completely remake his image, and get away from the nostalgia part of his act, that was his prerogative. But, if he kept the songs in the show, he should have treated them properly.

Still, it was only a handful of songs that suffered this fate. He didn't really screw around with That's All Right or Little Sister. He seemed to hold those songs, and a few others, in higher regard than Hound Dog, Teddy Bear and Don't Be Cruel.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 12:38 am

elvisjock wrote:Had Elvis actually written his songs, I think he would have treated even the oldies with respect. He didn't have the emotional connection to Don't Be Cruel, that McCartney might have with I Want To Hold Your Hand.

He was entitled to his feelings about them. If he wanted to completely remake his image, and get away from the nostalgia part of his act, that was his prerogative. But, if he kept the songs in the show, he should have treated them properly.

Still, it was only a handful of songs that suffered this fate. He didn't really screw around with That's All Right or Little Sister. He seemed to hold those songs, and a few others, in higher regard than Hound Dog, Teddy Bear and Don't Be Cruel.


yeah but little sister, and thats allright mama werent performed almost every night, little sister was mostly in 1972 a setlist standart, after that it became less and only on occasion. same goes for thats allright mama, mostly sung in 1971, after that only on occasions. Teddy Bear-Dont Be Cruel and Houndog, been kept from 71 till 77 on almost every show there is. So somehow its normal that elvis treats That's Allright & Little sister with more care then he did to the almost every night Teddy Bear/Dont Be Cruel and Hound Dog.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 2:02 am

Johnny2523 wrote:
elvisjock wrote:Had Elvis actually written his songs, I think he would have treated even the oldies with respect. He didn't have the emotional connection to Don't Be Cruel, that McCartney might have with I Want To Hold Your Hand.

He was entitled to his feelings about them. If he wanted to completely remake his image, and get away from the nostalgia part of his act, that was his prerogative. But, if he kept the songs in the show, he should have treated them properly.

Still, it was only a handful of songs that suffered this fate. He didn't really screw around with That's All Right or Little Sister. He seemed to hold those songs, and a few others, in higher regard than Hound Dog, Teddy Bear and Don't Be Cruel.


yeah but little sister, and thats allright mama werent performed almost every night, little sister was mostly in 1972 a setlist standart, after that it became less and only on occasion. same goes for thats allright mama, mostly sung in 1971, after that only on occasions. Teddy Bear-Dont Be Cruel and Houndog, been kept from 71 till 77 on almost every show there is. So somehow its normal that elvis treats That's Allright & Little sister with more care then he did to the almost every night Teddy Bear/Dont Be Cruel and Hound Dog.


That's All Right opened most if not all shows from 69 into 72. Yet, even when Elvis performed it in 76 and 77, he did it right.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 3:03 am

elvisjock wrote:That's All Right opened most if not all shows from 69 into 72. Yet, even when Elvis performed it in 76 and 77, he did it right.
[/quote][/quote]

In 1969 it was Blue Suede Shoes.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 3:23 am

L Ray wrote:
elvisjock wrote:That's All Right opened most if not all shows from 69 into 72. Yet, even when Elvis performed it in 76 and 77, he did it right.


In 1969 it was Blue Suede Shoes.


True, but it is also true Elvis seemed to care about his first single when doing it on stage in this period.

Ditto for these Sun-era tracks: "Mystery Train," "Tiger Man" and "Tryin' to Get to You."

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 5:11 am

He thought Hound Dog was "silly." He even said so, in '75.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 10:41 am

When you go back to the 70'th, from 1974 till the beginning of the 80th
There was a rock 'n Roll Revival , That was the atmosphere at that time.
In 1974 the sitcom Happy Day's came very populair , and in 1978 Grease was a big hit
. Elvis introduce in 1975 Little Darling ( a silly song as he mention in his show) and at the memphis show in 1976 Elvis said
That some people said he can't do some songs as That's Alright , and he just said " watch me".

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 4:51 pm

elvisjock wrote:He thought Hound Dog was "silly." He even said so, in '75.


Well, our man made a big difference that year putting Little Darlin' on the set list. If I had to choose one silly song...

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 9:03 pm

Agreed. One wonders what might have been the inspiration for adding the song. Perhaps it was something that he and the singing groups goofed around on. Indulgent as he was, it wouldn't be out of character for Little Darlin' to find its way in to the show.

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 9:11 pm

I don't mean to be cynical, but could it be that Little Darlin was just a simple song which didn't require a lot of effort?
Or possibly, Elvis just wanted to have fun and play around with it with the fans. I always thought the tenors were awful on this one.

rlj

Re: 3000 South Paridise Road

Wed Jan 02, 2013 9:51 pm

elvisjock wrote:Agreed. One wonders what might have been the inspiration for adding the song. Perhaps it was something that he and the singing groups goofed around on. Indulgent as he was, it wouldn't be out of character for Little Darlin' to find its way in to the show.


Even though he didn't treat some of his own catalog material with respect, and
as much as he wanted to do modern material , he did gravitate towards material he learned in the early days from other artists.

Here are more examples of pulling old songs by other artists from the good old days and recording them or using them in concert.

There is a pattern if you can see it. The criteria for my in-complete list is: none of these songs were recorded in the studio before 1970, and yet they originate long before Elvis attempted them in the studio or live, and the originals had been out for years when when Elvis attempted them.

Runaway
Hurt
Promised land
Unchained Melody
Pledging my love
Johnny b. Goode
My babe
He'll have to go
Faded love
Your the reason I'm Living
The wonder of you
Shake a hand


Footnotes: A song that nearly qualifies my criteria because it was recorded in 1970, but it surely seems to come from out of nowhere is his
live take on "rags to riches".

And technically "auld lange syne" should be on the list but they were probably expected given the night they were done.