Anything about Elvis
More than 30 Million visitors can't be wrong

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:24 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
greystoke wrote:It's galling that copyright issues are keeping the original, Johnny B Goode introduction from being used on Elvis On Tour ...

This reasoning has been bandied about for over two years, but we have yet to see even a single verification of this from an official source. Do you have one?


I don't. But why else would the film's opening be altered? Such has clearly been the general consensus any time this release has been discussed, and if Warner Bros. were interested in offering a new edit of On Tour, this surely wouldn't have extended to the opening credits alone. And we know that copyright issues have previously been imposed upon other Elvis releases, so this wouldn't be a precedent. Still, this doesn't make the current Blu-ray release worthless, even if the integrity of the original narrative is compromised -- you may not agree, but it could be a long time before we see another HD release of this particular film. And what we have is, otherwise, very good.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:34 am

People are talking about big cash. But if Time Warner cannot do anything with the footage because it will not earn back the money put into it, than what's the worth of the footage to Time Warner? They should then sell it and the rights too for a reasonable price or let somebody work on it and release for historical reasons in my opinion.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:55 am

nicolaas wrote:People are talking about big cash. But if Time Warner cannot do anything with the footage because it will not earn back the money put into it, than what's the worth of the footage to Time Warner? They should then sell it and the rights too for a reasonable price or let somebody work on it and release for historical reasons in my opinion.

Right on!

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 13, 2012 11:02 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:The opening sets up the entire film, it was carefully edited by Adidge and Abel to specifically match the images we see on the screen. And the Golden Globe was given for the film people saw in 1972-1973. Period.

I love the original introduction. It grabs you right away, from the sound of Elvis' own voice, to the 1937 image that comes up out of the darkness. Maybe someday we'll be able to own it on DVD and Blu-ray.

phpBB [video]


Elvis On Tour (2010 Release with Original Intro)
Uploaded by Anton Jeldres Tiselj on Aug 31, 2010
I hated the new "Don't Be Cruel" intro with all my guts, so I restored it back to
the original version that includes "Johnny B. Goode"...
This is what I see on my DVD player now :)


I did that, so I can say have the original release in DVD quality :D
And that's why I'm not complaining so much.
But I think we really need to have the original film on DVD/Blu-Ray, and a Special Edition too.
There's still hope... Image

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:21 pm

Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:27 pm

poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!

How do "we" know this?

Do "we" know how many were pressed in the first run?

And do "we" also know the expectations at physical retail for this product?

These are key facts to consider in any credible evaluation of this release.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:39 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!

How do "we" know this?

Do "we" know how many were pressed in the first run?

And do "we" also know the expectations at physical retail for this product?

These are key facts to consider in any credible evaluation of this release.


We know this because the numbers in question have been published with regards to how many items were sold over the last week including pre-orders. The expectations are unimportant in relation to this thread. Even if Sony's expectations were 7500 (as an example), that expectation shows that EOT would never be a viable venture when 5 times that amount would have to be sold to cover costs.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:42 pm

poormadpeter wrote:We know this because the numbers in question have been published with regards to how many items were sold over the last week including pre-orders.

Sony publishes their U.S. and U.K. sales numbers? Where?

And the other items of note are key in any credible analysis of the product.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:46 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:We know this because the numbers in question have been published with regards to how many items were sold over the last week including pre-orders.

Sony publishes their U.S. and U.K. sales numbers? Where?

And the other items of note are key in any credible analysis of the product.


Not in relation to this topic, they're not. If Sony try their damnedest to make a viable product and only expect to sell a few thousand, then there is no way in hell Warner would risk the product being asked for in this thread. And yes, other threads have listed the numbers being sold of this product in order for it to reach the chart number stated.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:55 pm

poormadpeter wrote:anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Warner in conjunction with FTD could make something available related to Elvis On Tour with a print run of 5,000 numbered copies only, with packaging and pricing along the lines of Boy From Tupelo (maybe higher) and then hit the mass market with a much cheaper version or versions to sell a few months later during the Christmas market, but not interferring with the FTD collector`s version for the real diehards! Just a thought :lol:

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 10:59 pm

sweetangeline wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Warner in conjunction with FTD could make something available related to Elvis On Tour with a print run of 5,000 numbered copies only, with packaging and pricing along the lines of Boy From Tupelo (maybe higher) and then hit the mass market with a much cheaper version or versions to sell a few months later during the Christmas market, but not interferring with the FTD collector`s version for the real diehards! Just a thought :lol:


I have already shown quite clearly in this thread, that this venture would cost more between millions to produce - especially if the set you are talking of is produced. Selling 5000 copies at $100 a copy would make a mere half a million.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 11:31 pm

poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 11:38 pm

Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.


On the contrary. You can only go by GUARANTEED sales. The only guaranteed sales is that of fans. This release of Prince was bought by most fans not for the video, but for the remastered and remixed sound we have been crying out for for decades. To suggest that there are approximately 30,000 non-hardcore fans ready to buy a relatively costly DVD or boxed set of Elvis On Tour is simply not feasible. If you were the head of warner how could you possibly be convinced of this? Had Prince sold, maybe 20,000-25,000 copies, then you would have a case that the general public has an appetite for quality Elvis product. But that isn't what happened. The figures show that only a couple of thousand people bought this who do not buy FTDs. there is no appetite for Elvis product amongst record/dvd buyers at the moment. if I was head of warner, I wouldn't invest in this venture either.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Mon Nov 19, 2012 11:45 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.


On the contrary. You can only go by GUARANTEED sales. The only guaranteed sales is that of fans. This release of Prince was bought by most fans not for the video, but for the remastered and remixed sound we have been crying out for for decades. To suggest that there are approximately 30,000 non-hardcore fans ready to buy a relatively costly DVD or boxed set of Elvis On Tour is simply not feasible. If you were the head of warner how could you possibly be convinced of this? Had Prince sold, maybe 20,000-25,000 copies, then you would have a case that the general public has an appetite for quality Elvis product. But that isn't what happened. The figures show that only a couple of thousand people bought this who do not buy FTDs. there is no appetite for Elvis product amongst record/dvd buyers at the moment. if I was head of warner, I wouldn't invest in this venture either.


I think you are wrong here Peter, Warner should look at the sales figures of Aloha and '68 Comeback DVD's, and they sold a heap, and base on those figures whether it would be feasible.
TTWII Special Edition sales figures were disappointing in the States but that's because some moron decided to air the film on national TV the day before the DVD release. Most people taped it and were happy with that.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 20, 2012 11:28 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:We know this because the numbers in question have been published with regards to how many items were sold over the last week including pre-orders.

Sony publishes their U.S. and U.K. sales numbers? Where?

And the other items of note are key in any credible analysis of the product.


Not in relation to this topic, they're not. If Sony try their damnedest to make a viable product and only expect to sell a few thousand, then there is no way in hell Warner would risk the product being asked for in this thread. And yes, other threads have listed the numbers being sold of this product in order for it to reach the chart number stated.

I see you have no answer for my queries, making your conclusions untenable. Thank you.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 20, 2012 11:33 pm

Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.


On the contrary. You can only go by GUARANTEED sales. The only guaranteed sales is that of fans. This release of Prince was bought by most fans not for the video, but for the remastered and remixed sound we have been crying out for for decades. To suggest that there are approximately 30,000 non-hardcore fans ready to buy a relatively costly DVD or boxed set of Elvis On Tour is simply not feasible. If you were the head of warner how could you possibly be convinced of this? Had Prince sold, maybe 20,000-25,000 copies, then you would have a case that the general public has an appetite for quality Elvis product. But that isn't what happened. The figures show that only a couple of thousand people bought this who do not buy FTDs. there is no appetite for Elvis product amongst record/dvd buyers at the moment. if I was head of warner, I wouldn't invest in this venture either.


I think you are wrong here Peter, Warner should look at the sales figures of Aloha and '68 Comeback DVD's, and they sold a heap, and base on those figures whether it would be feasible.
TTWII Special Edition sales figures were disappointing in the States but that's because some moron decided to air the film on national TV the day before the DVD release. Most people taped it and were happy with that.


The Aloha and 68 Comeback DVDs were released nearly a decade ago. No executive in their right mind would look at sales from nearly ten years earlier and suggest they are a good bet for sales figures today. What's more, they were very different product. Elvis On Tour has been issued on DVD and Blu-Ray already (minus two minutes), where as Aloha and the 68 comeback had not had been released on DVD in good quality at that time. Many non-hardcore fans will be quite satisifed with the EOT DVD, and not feel the need to buy the extra footage.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 20, 2012 11:51 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
jurasic1968 wrote:Ok, let's say the 4 concerts restored will cost 3 million dollars to put them on 3 or 4 DVD discs (with also the original release) . So doesn't EPE have these money???? When the estate makes tens of milion of dollars profit every year because of us, the fans????? These concerts are a very important Elvis's legacy and maybe the final one, because Elvis in concert 1977 is far away from that. So it's not excuse for them to not put all the efforts in such project (sooner or later it must be released and it's once in a lifetime, not every year or so). I am sick and tired about those money figures, and questions like if the release of these 4 DVD's will lose money or not. Those people are fans or Colonel Parker or what???


EPE HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH ELVIS ON TOUR.
perhaps if we put it in large print, it might sink in.


But I doubt it.
THEY CAN LICENSE IT!!!

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Tue Nov 20, 2012 11:55 pm

samses wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
jurasic1968 wrote:Ok, let's say the 4 concerts restored will cost 3 million dollars to put them on 3 or 4 DVD discs (with also the original release) . So doesn't EPE have these money???? When the estate makes tens of milion of dollars profit every year because of us, the fans????? These concerts are a very important Elvis's legacy and maybe the final one, because Elvis in concert 1977 is far away from that. So it's not excuse for them to not put all the efforts in such project (sooner or later it must be released and it's once in a lifetime, not every year or so). I am sick and tired about those money figures, and questions like if the release of these 4 DVD's will lose money or not. Those people are fans or Colonel Parker or what???


EPE HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH ELVIS ON TOUR.
perhaps if we put it in large print, it might sink in.


But I doubt it.
THEY CAN LICENSE IT!!!


Not really. To licence the material would also result in them giving up the rights to EOT the movie as well, I would think. And, as has been stated before, if EPE did get hold of the material, it would still need to go through the same restoration processes as it would at Warner. Except it would cost EPE more as they don't have the facilities inhouse.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:15 am

poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.


On the contrary. You can only go by GUARANTEED sales. The only guaranteed sales is that of fans. This release of Prince was bought by most fans not for the video, but for the remastered and remixed sound we have been crying out for for decades. To suggest that there are approximately 30,000 non-hardcore fans ready to buy a relatively costly DVD or boxed set of Elvis On Tour is simply not feasible. If you were the head of warner how could you possibly be convinced of this? Had Prince sold, maybe 20,000-25,000 copies, then you would have a case that the general public has an appetite for quality Elvis product. But that isn't what happened. The figures show that only a couple of thousand people bought this who do not buy FTDs. there is no appetite for Elvis product amongst record/dvd buyers at the moment. if I was head of warner, I wouldn't invest in this venture either.


I think you are wrong here Peter, Warner should look at the sales figures of Aloha and '68 Comeback DVD's, and they sold a heap, and base on those figures whether it would be feasible.
TTWII Special Edition sales figures were disappointing in the States but that's because some moron decided to air the film on national TV the day before the DVD release. Most people taped it and were happy with that.


The Aloha and 68 Comeback DVDs were released nearly a decade ago. No executive in their right mind would look at sales from nearly ten years earlier and suggest they are a good bet for sales figures today. What's more, they were very different product. Elvis On Tour has been issued on DVD and Blu-Ray already (minus two minutes), where as Aloha and the 68 comeback had not had been released on DVD in good quality at that time. Many non-hardcore fans will be quite satisifed with the EOT DVD, and not feel the need to buy the extra footage.


The Aloha show and even the Rehearsal show were already released on DVD in the late Nineties, 1998 if I remember correctly. Still very many fans bought the Box set. Warner could even put a complete On Tour concert together and air it on TV, new TV specials also cost a lot of money, restoration costs should not be a problem then. And I can't believe that not enough people would turn on their TV to watch a never before seen show of Elvis. It's more a question of not being interested in such a project I fear.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:16 am

it sold 7000 copies?, somewhere else i read this set would only be limited to 5000 copies

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:28 am

Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.


On the contrary. You can only go by GUARANTEED sales. The only guaranteed sales is that of fans. This release of Prince was bought by most fans not for the video, but for the remastered and remixed sound we have been crying out for for decades. To suggest that there are approximately 30,000 non-hardcore fans ready to buy a relatively costly DVD or boxed set of Elvis On Tour is simply not feasible. If you were the head of warner how could you possibly be convinced of this? Had Prince sold, maybe 20,000-25,000 copies, then you would have a case that the general public has an appetite for quality Elvis product. But that isn't what happened. The figures show that only a couple of thousand people bought this who do not buy FTDs. there is no appetite for Elvis product amongst record/dvd buyers at the moment. if I was head of warner, I wouldn't invest in this venture either.


I think you are wrong here Peter, Warner should look at the sales figures of Aloha and '68 Comeback DVD's, and they sold a heap, and base on those figures whether it would be feasible.
TTWII Special Edition sales figures were disappointing in the States but that's because some moron decided to air the film on national TV the day before the DVD release. Most people taped it and were happy with that.


The Aloha and 68 Comeback DVDs were released nearly a decade ago. No executive in their right mind would look at sales from nearly ten years earlier and suggest they are a good bet for sales figures today. What's more, they were very different product. Elvis On Tour has been issued on DVD and Blu-Ray already (minus two minutes), where as Aloha and the 68 comeback had not had been released on DVD in good quality at that time. Many non-hardcore fans will be quite satisifed with the EOT DVD, and not feel the need to buy the extra footage.


The Aloha show and even the Rehearsal show were already released on DVD in the late Nineties, 1998 if I remember correctly. Still very many fans bought the Box set. Warner could even put a complete On Tour concert together and air it on TV, new TV specials also cost a lot of money, restoration costs should not be a problem then. And I can't believe that not enough people would turn on their TV to watch a never before seen show of Elvis. It's more a question of not being interested in such a project I fear.


The quality of the late 1990s dvds of the two tv specials was far below that of the later release - and I'm not even sure of their legality either, to be honest. It's not about interest, it's about money. If there was money in the venture, it would be done by now.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:35 am

poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.


On the contrary. You can only go by GUARANTEED sales. The only guaranteed sales is that of fans. This release of Prince was bought by most fans not for the video, but for the remastered and remixed sound we have been crying out for for decades. To suggest that there are approximately 30,000 non-hardcore fans ready to buy a relatively costly DVD or boxed set of Elvis On Tour is simply not feasible. If you were the head of warner how could you possibly be convinced of this? Had Prince sold, maybe 20,000-25,000 copies, then you would have a case that the general public has an appetite for quality Elvis product. But that isn't what happened. The figures show that only a couple of thousand people bought this who do not buy FTDs. there is no appetite for Elvis product amongst record/dvd buyers at the moment. if I was head of warner, I wouldn't invest in this venture either.


I think you are wrong here Peter, Warner should look at the sales figures of Aloha and '68 Comeback DVD's, and they sold a heap, and base on those figures whether it would be feasible.
TTWII Special Edition sales figures were disappointing in the States but that's because some moron decided to air the film on national TV the day before the DVD release. Most people taped it and were happy with that.


The Aloha and 68 Comeback DVDs were released nearly a decade ago. No executive in their right mind would look at sales from nearly ten years earlier and suggest they are a good bet for sales figures today. What's more, they were very different product. Elvis On Tour has been issued on DVD and Blu-Ray already (minus two minutes), where as Aloha and the 68 comeback had not had been released on DVD in good quality at that time. Many non-hardcore fans will be quite satisifed with the EOT DVD, and not feel the need to buy the extra footage.


The Aloha show and even the Rehearsal show were already released on DVD in the late Nineties, 1998 if I remember correctly. Still very many fans bought the Box set. Warner could even put a complete On Tour concert together and air it on TV, new TV specials also cost a lot of money, restoration costs should not be a problem then. And I can't believe that not enough people would turn on their TV to watch a never before seen show of Elvis. It's more a question of not being interested in such a project I fear.


The quality of the late 1990s dvds of the two tv specials was far below that of the later release - and I'm not even sure of their legality either, to be honest. It's not about interest, it's about money. If there was money in the venture, it would be done by now.


But how on earth is that possible Peter (not saying it isn't so) but 600.000 people stroll through Graceland each year, about 50.000!! people were in Memphis this year August 16th, common sense would dictate that these people who go through all the trouble of going to Memphis would be interested in buying a new concert on DVD. I understand that not all 600.000 people are hardcore Elvis fans but even if half of them are, then I can't understand why such a DVD wouldn't sell. By the way the nineties releases of Aloha and Rehearsal were legal, they were released in conjunction with EPE. And I still say that if Aloha and '68 sold well, and they did, that a new April '72 concert would also sell well.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:47 am

Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.


On the contrary. You can only go by GUARANTEED sales. The only guaranteed sales is that of fans. This release of Prince was bought by most fans not for the video, but for the remastered and remixed sound we have been crying out for for decades. To suggest that there are approximately 30,000 non-hardcore fans ready to buy a relatively costly DVD or boxed set of Elvis On Tour is simply not feasible. If you were the head of warner how could you possibly be convinced of this? Had Prince sold, maybe 20,000-25,000 copies, then you would have a case that the general public has an appetite for quality Elvis product. But that isn't what happened. The figures show that only a couple of thousand people bought this who do not buy FTDs. there is no appetite for Elvis product amongst record/dvd buyers at the moment. if I was head of warner, I wouldn't invest in this venture either.


I think you are wrong here Peter, Warner should look at the sales figures of Aloha and '68 Comeback DVD's, and they sold a heap, and base on those figures whether it would be feasible.
TTWII Special Edition sales figures were disappointing in the States but that's because some moron decided to air the film on national TV the day before the DVD release. Most people taped it and were happy with that.


The Aloha and 68 Comeback DVDs were released nearly a decade ago. No executive in their right mind would look at sales from nearly ten years earlier and suggest they are a good bet for sales figures today. What's more, they were very different product. Elvis On Tour has been issued on DVD and Blu-Ray already (minus two minutes), where as Aloha and the 68 comeback had not had been released on DVD in good quality at that time. Many non-hardcore fans will be quite satisifed with the EOT DVD, and not feel the need to buy the extra footage.


The Aloha show and even the Rehearsal show were already released on DVD in the late Nineties, 1998 if I remember correctly. Still very many fans bought the Box set. Warner could even put a complete On Tour concert together and air it on TV, new TV specials also cost a lot of money, restoration costs should not be a problem then. And I can't believe that not enough people would turn on their TV to watch a never before seen show of Elvis. It's more a question of not being interested in such a project I fear.


The quality of the late 1990s dvds of the two tv specials was far below that of the later release - and I'm not even sure of their legality either, to be honest. It's not about interest, it's about money. If there was money in the venture, it would be done by now.


But how on earth is that possible Peter (not saying it isn't so) but 600.000 people stroll through Graceland each year, about 50.000!! people were in Memphis this year August 16th, common sense would dictate that these people who go through all the trouble of going to Memphis would be interested in buying a new concert on DVD. I understand that not all 600.000 people are hardcore Elvis fans but even if half of them are, then I can't understand why such a DVD wouldn't sell. By the way the nineties releases of Aloha and Rehearsal were legal, they were released in conjunction with EPE. And I still say that if Aloha and '68 sold well, and they did, that a new April '72 concert would also sell well.


And then not Hampton Roads '72 because that concert is almost complete in video terms. Altough it might be cheaper to release that show in its entirity because its almost complete. They would only need to master the remaining songs.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:58 am

Johnny2523 wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:
Simon1 wrote:
poormadpeter wrote:Now that we know that Prince from Another Planet has sold a measly 7000 units between Britain and America, anyone still want to bet that 40,000 units can be sold of an EOT concert in order to make it a viable venture?!


Absolutely. You cannot compare crisp professionally multi camera angle filmed 16mm footage to out of focus terribly grainy snippets of amateur 8mm footage Peter.


On the contrary. You can only go by GUARANTEED sales. The only guaranteed sales is that of fans. This release of Prince was bought by most fans not for the video, but for the remastered and remixed sound we have been crying out for for decades. To suggest that there are approximately 30,000 non-hardcore fans ready to buy a relatively costly DVD or boxed set of Elvis On Tour is simply not feasible. If you were the head of warner how could you possibly be convinced of this? Had Prince sold, maybe 20,000-25,000 copies, then you would have a case that the general public has an appetite for quality Elvis product. But that isn't what happened. The figures show that only a couple of thousand people bought this who do not buy FTDs. there is no appetite for Elvis product amongst record/dvd buyers at the moment. if I was head of warner, I wouldn't invest in this venture either.


I think you are wrong here Peter, Warner should look at the sales figures of Aloha and '68 Comeback DVD's, and they sold a heap, and base on those figures whether it would be feasible.
TTWII Special Edition sales figures were disappointing in the States but that's because some moron decided to air the film on national TV the day before the DVD release. Most people taped it and were happy with that.


The Aloha and 68 Comeback DVDs were released nearly a decade ago. No executive in their right mind would look at sales from nearly ten years earlier and suggest they are a good bet for sales figures today. What's more, they were very different product. Elvis On Tour has been issued on DVD and Blu-Ray already (minus two minutes), where as Aloha and the 68 comeback had not had been released on DVD in good quality at that time. Many non-hardcore fans will be quite satisifed with the EOT DVD, and not feel the need to buy the extra footage.


The Aloha show and even the Rehearsal show were already released on DVD in the late Nineties, 1998 if I remember correctly. Still very many fans bought the Box set. Warner could even put a complete On Tour concert together and air it on TV, new TV specials also cost a lot of money, restoration costs should not be a problem then. And I can't believe that not enough people would turn on their TV to watch a never before seen show of Elvis. It's more a question of not being interested in such a project I fear.


The quality of the late 1990s dvds of the two tv specials was far below that of the later release - and I'm not even sure of their legality either, to be honest. It's not about interest, it's about money. If there was money in the venture, it would be done by now.


But how on earth is that possible Peter (not saying it isn't so) but 600.000 people stroll through Graceland each year, about 50.000!! people were in Memphis this year August 16th, common sense would dictate that these people who go through all the trouble of going to Memphis would be interested in buying a new concert on DVD. I understand that not all 600.000 people are hardcore Elvis fans but even if half of them are, then I can't understand why such a DVD wouldn't sell. By the way the nineties releases of Aloha and Rehearsal were legal, they were released in conjunction with EPE. And I still say that if Aloha and '68 sold well, and they did, that a new April '72 concert would also sell well.


And then not Hampton Roads '72 because that concert is almost complete in video terms. Altough it might be cheaper to release that show in its entirity because its almost complete. They would only need to master the remaining songs.



............................................

yes Johnny thats a cool answer you have given my friend - I agree with you - Turner or EPE must own the Rights to EOT - The Hampton Roads concert - is more or less in its entirety I agree with you buddy - With the sales of new release - Prince from Another Planet - I feel that soon MGM - / Sony should release EOT with the interests from all the fans around the world buying the new deluxe edition and Legacy cd - This could be a stepping stone for Eot - ( Are you listening Ernst Jorgensen ) and Sony - Its about time i think EOT should be released on dvd -

''Its Been A Long Time Comn ''
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Re: Time Warner and Elvis On Tour

Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:59 am

I think if Elvis's concerts were all very different, there would be more interest. How many people other than hard core fans care to see him in a different jumpsuit doing basically the same show over & over, especially in 1972? EOT gives fans a pretty good overview of what an Elvis show was like then and now you have the MSG set giving 2 complete shows on CD and 20 mins of DVD footage. To be honest, I am not sure there would be much interest in a 1972 show by the overall public with all this product available already.