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Re: Elvis beyond the 50s.

Wed Oct 31, 2012 9:22 pm

King Volcano wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
King Volcano wrote:Beauty School Dropout is not something I care about, but at least it's pretty witty. Elvis never did a witty movie song, the attempts at humour are all disastrous as far as I can recall.

True, but what is truly peculiar is that this song from 1971's "Grease" was ruefully claimed as the focus of some kind of untoward praise on this forum, when the truth of the matter is it was praised by no one, and only ever brought up by the person who complained about it. Very odd.


It sounds like the English playwrite Joe Orton, who to get people talking about his latest play, would write letters using a psuedonym to the press condemning the play, then a while later write another under a different name, defending the play & condemning the previous complaint (which was of course by him!) :)

Maybe Orton is one of his heroes. ;-)

Re: Elvis beyond the 50s.

Wed Oct 31, 2012 10:38 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Marc Haegeman wrote:
brian wrote:I thought the cover art for Elvis was okay during the 1960s.

It was during the 1970s that it completely sucked.

The CD re-issues or new compilations for TTWII, Aloha and Burning Love featured much better cover art than the original LP's.


You sure must like cut and paste work, Brian ;-) And what to make of that PHS cover with a pic of Elvis from three years earlier?

Most of the Presley LP designs in the 1960s were cheap, an insult to the artist and a reflection of the lack of thought put into the music inside. Most in the 1970s were no better. It is no surprise they were all designed by Tom Parker, someone for whom art direction was a foreign concept.


Exactly... while Parker was handling his scissors, the Beatles came up with something like Rubber Soul and Revolver.

Re: Elvis beyond the 50s.

Wed Oct 31, 2012 11:03 pm

Marc Haegeman wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Marc Haegeman wrote:
brian wrote:I thought the cover art for Elvis was okay during the 1960s.

It was during the 1970s that it completely sucked.

The CD re-issues or new compilations for TTWII, Aloha and Burning Love featured much better cover art than the original LP's.


You sure must like cut and paste work, Brian ;-) And what to make of that PHS cover with a pic of Elvis from three years earlier?

Most of the Presley LP designs in the 1960s were cheap, an insult to the artist and a reflection of the lack of thought put into the music inside. Most in the 1970s were no better. It is no surprise they were all designed by Tom Parker, someone for whom art direction was a foreign concept.


Exactly... while Parker was handling his scissors, the Beatles came up with something like Rubber Soul and Revolver.


Let's not forget that if the 1960s LP artwork was an insult to the artist, then the recordings inside were an insult to the fans.

Re: Elvis beyond the 50s.

Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:39 pm

There's a lot of (yustified)bad talk about his '60 work, but let's not forget
the amount of great songs El recorded in this period.
If we take a look at the (for example) box set "From Nashville to Memphis: The Essential 60's Masters"
you will be suprised about the amond of quality songs, ad some of the great movie songs (yes there are)
to it and you got a very impressive collection ot top songs wich most artists would envy.

Re: Elvis beyond the 50s.

Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:50 pm

hli wrote:There's a lot of (yustified)bad talk about his '60 work, but let's not forget the amount of great songs El recorded in this period.
If we take a look at the (for example) box set "From Nashville to Memphis: The Essential 60's Masters" you will be suprised about the amond of quality songs, ad some of the great movie songs (yes there are) to it and you got a very impressive collection ot top songs wich most artists would envy.

No one is arguing that Elvis managed to live up to his talent between 1960 and 1969, but the '60s box proves that his finest and most consistent work bookended the decade: Mar-Apr 1960, Nashville and Jan-Feb 1969, Memphis.

The point being made is that when Elvis stopped devoting himself to his craft, his music became irrelevant, his star faded, and those musicians and fans he left behind were shocked. And stunned.