Anything about Elvis
More than 30 Million visitors can't be wrong

Re: Painful viewing

Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:01 pm

skatterbrane wrote:I much prefer the undubbed version of Unchained Melody used on The Great Performances, than the over-dubbed 45 single version

As noted previously - it is not undubbed on The Great Performances, it is just less-dubbed than the 1978 single.

Re: Painful viewing

Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:13 pm

Matthew wrote:
skatterbrane wrote:I much prefer the undubbed version of Unchained Melody used on The Great Performances, than the over-dubbed 45 single version

As noted previously - it is not undubbed on The Great Performances, it is just less-dubbed than the 1978 single.


true
The undubbed version will be on the cbs concerts CD by gravelroad ::rocks

Re: Painful viewing

Fri Jun 07, 2013 4:49 pm

poormadpeter wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
Wiebe wrote:Poormanpeter you are so right about Baker. Unbelievable what came out of him even when after they knocked his teeth out in 68. I guess Elvis was an amateur musically compared to him. But then I still listen to him more often than I do to Baker. I guess his great voice and ability to touch people, until the very end, is what makes me come back to his music. This is what I find monumental. No matter what state he was in there was always a moment during his show where managed to do that. And during Rapid City there are many moments where he still touched me, no matter the imperfections.


Couldn't disagree more with that.


It depends how you grade musicality. Could Elvis play an instrument as well as Baker? No. Did Elvis have a working knowledge of musical theory that Baker must have had to partake in the form of jazz that he did? No. Could Elvis take a melody, and take it through an endless series of variations over the same chord progression? Not really. Don't Think Twice is the nearest record we have of him doing that, and it's certainly Presley's most jazz-like performance in terms of form.

While a swing musician could, theoretically, sit down and play what's in front of him and it still be jazz (as a member of a big band would), Baker belonged to a different school of jazz entirely, which was virtually all about improvisation. The tunes they were improvising over were often complex chord progressions that were typical of the writers of standards during the 1930s and 1940s, and not three chord rock n roll songs. Bearing that in mind, Baker had to have more musical knowledge than Elvis in order to survive.

From a performing point of view, Baker may well be classed as more "amateur" in that he sometimes didn't show up, was sometimes stoned, etc. But then Elvis himself barely showed up for some shows, leaving you wondering why he bothered. Presley's shows were slicker, of course, but a jazz performance is a more informal affair anyway for the most part.

How would you say that Presley was more professional than Baker, Doc?


Another request to hear the basis of a point of view ignored. Surprise!