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Re: ACCEPT ELVIS

Sun Dec 30, 2012 5:23 pm

jurasic1968 wrote:Elvis liked Berry because he recorded Johnny B.Goode, Memphis and Promised Land (to me Elvis sounds better in this one than Chuck). BTW, exists any Johnny B.Goode version of Elvis when he sang it with all the verses?

I've not heard any recorded version of Elvis singing Johnny B Goode from August 3, 1969 onward that contained the "gunny sack" verse. Not sure if he attempted the song prior to that or if any rehearsals for the August '69 engagement were recorded.

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Re: ACCEPT ELVIS

Mon Dec 31, 2012 10:53 am

elvis-fan wrote:I've not heard any recorded version of Elvis singing Johnny B Goode from August 3, 1969 onward that contained the "gunny sack" verse. Not sure if he attempted the song prior to that or if any rehearsals for the August '69 engagement were recorded.


Elvis ran down a bit of the "carry his guitar in a gunny sack" verse in late 1974:

Elvis Presley, "Johnny B. Goode"
South Bend, Indiana, Monday, September 30, 1974

http://jordans-elvis-world.com/audio/rare/new/47.ram

Chuck Berry was clearly someone Elvis loved very, very much!

Re: ACCEPT ELVIS

Wed Jan 02, 2013 8:07 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:
elvis-fan wrote:I've not heard any recorded version of Elvis singing Johnny B Goode from August 3, 1969 onward that contained the "gunny sack" verse. Not sure if he attempted the song prior to that or if any rehearsals for the August '69 engagement were recorded.


Elvis ran down a bit of the "carry his guitar in a gunny sack" verse in late 1974:

Elvis Presley, "Johnny B. Goode"
South Bend, Indiana, Monday, September 30, 1974

http://jordans-elvis-world.com/audio/rare/new/47.ram

Chuck Berry was clearly someone Elvis loved very, very much!


Wasn't aware of that one... thanks DJC! A bit of a mess with the lyrics but still interesting to hear.

Re: ACCEPT ELVIS

Wed Jan 02, 2013 9:06 pm

likethebike wrote:I accept that Elvis got fat, addicted to drugs and died and that the performer in 1976/1977 despite the moment of occasional genius, was only a shadow of the performer from five years earlier let alone 20 years earlier. It's just this idea that he was somehow an underachiever that consistently rankles me. And that somehow there was some magic bullet that would have saved him. It was genuinely tragic that we were denied the potential work he may achieved in a middle and old age and that he did not see the true accolades that would come his way. However, in the 20 plus years of his career, he built up what's a staggering body of work. The only medium where he truly failed was in film and even in that he scored some truly memorable moments. There's no reason to pine for what could have been done because what was done was so powerful and deep.

And more importantly, there was no magic bullet to save him. There were frustrations with his work from time to time, but they were not the cause of his death, although it could have been one of many elements. However, when an artist dies of drugs in a hot streak like Amy Winehouse, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin or even Jim Morrison we never think that. Or look at James Dean, on top of the world but self-destructive as hell. Elvis had a ton of problems and touring the world would have only done so much to solve them, same for an Oscar. He had an unusually short attention span which led him to problems that other artists might not have had. He had a lifestyle problem in that he lived unlike other people and he was the sole support system in his personal universe. The magnitude of his celebrity may have retarded his ability to develop a committed one to one relationship with a woman, not only because of the utter magnitude of women at his disposal but because nearly all of those women saw him as Elvis first, as a person second. Going from poverty to obscene wealth was also a problem. He was hell bound to draw in as much experience and pleasure as he could and drugs were a big way to help with that. He was big on uppers because they helped you stay awake and party more. That he spent his money as fast as he got it was another reason he may have burned out. Instead of relaxing in his final years, he was constantly forced to go on tour to make more money. The stimulation in work that we see could also have been achieved had Elvis gotten involved with some causes like Civil Rights. That would have been an area to focus his concentration. He may have been clinically depressed. At the very worst moment of his young life, he did not get time to mourn his mother properly as he had to deal immediately with the stress of his armed forces incarceration which was far worse for him than it would have been for an average recruit because the time in the service could have taken away everything he'd earned to that point.

So there's much that goes into it, that it's a mistake to look for a magic bullet that would have saved him. Yes, 42 is far too young to die, but it's important to remember that despite dying in a down moment in his career that he left a towering legacy. When we remember Elvis Presley it is important to remember that helpless performer struggling through some of those 1977 shows, as only a cautionary tale that fame, and power and success are not the only keys to happiness. But it's more important to remember first all he gave to us. Above all Elvis Presley should be that young athlete sliding across the floor singing "Jailhouse Rock" in the movie of the same name, the young dynamo burning out of the gate on the Dorsey shows, the man sending up an entire culture with his performance of "Hound Dog," on Milton Berle, the same young man showing his religious roots on Ed Sullivan and on the same show responding to an insane level of enthusiasm with self-deprecating humor, the ambitious want to do everything artist of Elvis is Back, the humility and light-hearted grace of the man who did His Hand in Mine, the rolliciking stud sexing up the silver screen with Ann Margaret in Viva Las Vegas, the singer who gave almost a religious power to a ballad like "Can't Help Falling in Love," the singer who redefined genre in his own image covering an astonishing array of American musical styles and fusing them into his own individual entity, the young man thinking he might be run out of town for singing "That's All Right Mama" in a style that bridged black and white culture, the man who made a television special that is to this day a a standard of greatness in the medium, the live performer who redefined the live concert experience in the 1950s as well as in the late 1960s and early 70s, creating outrage in the first and plaudits in the second, that preacher who crossed the line between the secular and the religious on that glorious bridge to "Suspicious Minds," the 37 year old rocker who turned out "Burning Love" showing you could still rock in middle age and at the same session churned out two divorce ballads that acknowledged the passage of time and the changing concerns of that time, the sincere singer who paid tribute to one of the nation's greatest heroes with "If I Can Dream," and on and on.

Far more than that bloated pathetic figure in his last concerts or the bored neutered mannequin in some of his worst films, ALL THAT was Elvis Presley.






Excellent post! :D

Re: ACCEPT ELVIS

Wed Jan 02, 2013 10:30 pm

elvis-fan wrote:
drjohncarpenter wrote:
elvis-fan wrote:I've not heard any recorded version of Elvis singing Johnny B Goode from August 3, 1969 onward that contained the "gunny sack" verse. Not sure if he attempted the song prior to that or if any rehearsals for the August '69 engagement were recorded.


Elvis ran down a bit of the "carry his guitar in a gunny sack" verse in late 1974:

Elvis Presley, "Johnny B. Goode"
South Bend, Indiana, Monday, September 30, 1974

http://jordans-elvis-world.com/audio/rare/new/47.ram

Chuck Berry was clearly someone Elvis loved very, very much!


Wasn't aware of that one... thanks DJC! A bit of a mess with the lyrics but still interesting to hear.


You're most welcome. Always happy to help!