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New Book -Channeling Elvis

Sun Sep 28, 2014 6:52 am

My new book, Channeling Elvis: How Television Saved the King of Rock 'n' Roll, has been published by Beats & Measures Press LLC, and is available from Amazon in the U.S. (http://tinyurl.com/mhyaouz) and in the U.K. (http://tinyurl.com/kyolbnm)!

You can read parts of the book through Amazon's "Look Inside" feature and here is a full sample chapter from the book. Hope you like it!

http://tinyurl.com/nau2oxy

The Kindle e-book edition also will be available soon.

Please pass the word and the links to all of your Facebook friends and give the book a buzz on Twitter as well and "follow me" there (@AlamoBuff814)

Also please visit my Facebook Authors Page: http://tinyurl.com/pofg47v

and my Amazon Authors Page: http://tinyurl.com/po638bd

I hope that Elvis' millions of fans the world over will enjoy this new view of the King's career and, maybe, learn something new about it. I know i did.

Many thanks!!

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Sun Sep 28, 2014 8:00 am

Channeling Elvis wrote:My new book, Channeling Elvis: How Television Saved the King of Rock 'n' Roll, has been published by Beats & Measures Press LLC, and is available from Amazon in the U.S. (http://tinyurl.com/mhyaouz) and in the U.K. (http://tinyurl.com/kyolbnm)!

You can read parts of the book through Amazon's "Look Inside" feature and here is a full sample chapter from the book. Hope you like it!

http://tinyurl.com/nau2oxy

The Kindle e-book edition also will be available soon.

Please pass the word and the links to all of your Facebook friends and give the book a buzz on Twitter as well and "follow me" there (@AlamoBuff814)

Also please visit my Facebook Authors Page: http://tinyurl.com/pofg47v

and my Amazon Authors Page: http://tinyurl.com/po638bd

I hope that Elvis' millions of fans the world over will enjoy this new view of the King's career and, maybe, learn something new about it. I know i did.

Many thanks!!


What exactly is the "new view"?

Can you share with us what it is, and what is so new about this "new view"?

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Sun Sep 28, 2014 9:24 am

He had an earlier topic, and it sounds inviting. A look at the relationship between Elvis and television with fresh interviews, if I recall the earlier topic correctly.

I have to remember, because unfortunately the links don't work. You should surround all urls with the url tag when you compose the post. I am having a difficult time on a mobile device copying the links to see it.

Just select the whole link, and push the "url" button.

Oh, and please let us know when the Kindle version is available. I will get it then.

rjm

Sent via mobile

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Sun Sep 28, 2014 5:47 pm

Serves me right for being largely computer illiterate! Sorry for the non-functioning links! Here is a new posting of the same announcement. I tested the links in "Preview" and they all worked, so please accept my apology for that glitch.

Hope you all like the book!!

Allen

My new book, Channeling Elvis: How Television Saved the King of Rock 'n' Roll, has been published by Beats & Measures Press LLC, and is available from Amazon in the U.S. (http://tinyurl.com/mhyaouz) and in the U.K. (http://tinyurl.com/kyolbnm)!

You can read parts of the book through Amazon's "Look Inside" feature and here is a full sample chapter from the book. Hope you like it!

http://tinyurl.com/nau2oxy

The Kindle e-book edition also will be available soon.

Please pass the word and the links to all of your Facebook friends and give the book a buzz on Twitter as well and "follow me" there (@AlamoBuff814)

Also please visit my Facebook Authors Page: http://tinyurl.com/pofg47v

and my Amazon Authors Page: http://tinyurl.com/po638bd

I hope that Elvis' millions of fans the world over will enjoy this new view of the King's career and, maybe, learn something new about it. I know i did.

Many thanks!!

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Sun Sep 28, 2014 10:52 pm

To answer one of the questions above regarding what is new in the book: First, I conducted some 40 interviews with people who performed with Elvis (Scotty Moore, D.J. Fontana, Glen D. Hardin, Joe Guercio, Gordon Stoker, Bobby Ogdin, et al) or knew him well (like Jerry Schilling) as well as those outside of Elvis' group who produced, directed, or performed on those TV shows (Steve Allen, Imogene Coca, Steve Binder, Bones Howe, Marty Pasetta, et al). This gave me two points of view: from those inside Elvis' circle and those outside of it.

Second, I had no intention of reinventing the wheel and doing another full bio of the King. Instead, I wanted to look at his 20-year performing career (1956-1977) as a national star, trace how he got there, and how that career played out. I reviewed hours of TV footage and much other footage of him on stage, both officially released and not-officially-released. Elvis was perhaps the most famous, recognizable entertainer of the 20th century, yet surprisingly little official footage was shot of him, outside of the TV shows. There are the 2 1970s documentary films and some stuff from the Tupelo 1956 shows, an early, silent color clip and maybe a bit more stuff, which I'm sure most of you have seen, but not much else. No one had ever tried to look at Elvis' career through images of him actually doing what he loved most: performing live! By tracing the arc of his career through the TV shows, I thought I could capture a new view of it. After all, he really wasn't well known outside the south prior to his first TV appearances in early 1956. By the autumn of that year, the entire country, and much of the world, knew who he was, had seen him, and heard his records. Few events of the latter 20th century were as eagerly anticipated, talked about, and argued about, as his debut on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1956. That's quite a quantum leap in just a few months. His eleven TV appearances that year (not counting the Hy Gardner interview show or the final Sullivan show in 1957) are the only way I know of to recreate the impact Elvis had so quickly and what it looked like. The harder part was trying to convey what the United States was like in 1956, the midst of the conservative Eisenhower years, when a guy who looked and performed like Elvis really alarmed adult America, while simultaneously lighting a fire under the kids, and igniting the rock 'n' roll era, which is still going and still owes much to the King.

Third, in reviewing the literature, I found very little information about Elvis' final TV appearance, Elvis In Concert. Perhaps this is because the program has never been officially released on video and was only shown a few times on TV before largely vanishing into bootleg land. As I'm sure most of you have done, I spent much time viewing the two officially taped concerts that were used to create that special, as well as the special itself. I spent a lot more time viewing all of the concert footage I could get from 1969-1977, all of it unofficial stuff (beside the footage from That's the Way It Is and Elvis on Tour, and more recently released stuff, like Prince from Another Planet). I used that as a base on which to evaluate Elvis In Concert, while also retracing the King's performing career during the last 8 years of his life. That alone only told me so much, but I also spent a lot of time interviewing Gary Smith and Dwight Hemion, who produced and directed the show, Andy Zall who edited it, and others, including members of Elvis' band. Hemion was in the unique position of having directed the Steve Allen Show when Elvis appeared on it as well as this final show, so his perspective was very interesting. I spend nearly 3 chapters on that special alone and I think much of it will be quite new to readers, even long-time Elvis fans. Similarly, I found a lot that was new to me about the Aloha from Hawaii special, even after reading about it in other books and I spend two of the longer chapters describing what happened to that special and how the concert itself differed from the televised special that most people saw, especially the bloated version aired in the U.S. months after the concert had been taped.

Although this is not a Presley biography, I did attempt to fill in the long gaps between his TV appearances, which were often years apart. I inserted chapters that bridge those periods by filling in essential information about what Elvis was doing during those times. These include chapters on his military service, his years spent in Hollywood, and his years on stage after he returned to live performances. These chapters lend greater perspective to the television shows by putting them in the broader context of his career. Television captured him at major moments when his career took sharp turns in various directions. Television also has left us the most coherent visual record of his performing style and ability throughout his career.

Allen

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:10 pm

Think you are promoting your book in the wrong place, Allen.

Everything you want to know about Elvis you will find on this forum, and its totally free.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:45 pm

My pleasure.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Mon Sep 29, 2014 1:13 am

Channeling Elvis wrote:Third, in reviewing the literature, I found very little information about Elvis' final TV appearance, Elvis In Concert.


It's amazing really. So little is actually known about EIC, it's like a lost weekend in the Presley story.


Channeling Elvis wrote:Hemion was in the unique position of having directed the Steve Allen Show when Elvis appeared on it as well as this final show, so his perspective was very interesting.


So, Hemion would have been witness to both the first, and the last times Elvis was to be challenged in front of TV cameras.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Mon Sep 29, 2014 3:02 am

Hemion was there at both ends, yes; very unique in that respect. I don't think the Allen show was the first time he was challenged by the TV cameras. Elvis (and his band) didn't like doing TV, partly because it restricted his movements, and this was true from the beginning. But he (and, even more so, the Colonel) understood how important TV was to him, especially in the early going, and Elvis understood that he had to learn to adapt to it. It paid off big time.

As to Elvis In Concert, I was very surprised at how scant the info on that was, even in Peter Guralnick's book. It's as if no one really wants to think or talk about that show, and for pretty obvious reasons. But I think it's very important and documents Elvis' end just as sharply as Stage Show preserves his early energy and charisma. I think a lot more will now be known about the show from my book. Everyone in Elvis' circle hated it and thought it should never be aired; it's never been released on home video. I understand that, but it is interesting that Jerry Schilling, who actually phoned Colonel Parker to protest the special being aired and still hates it, had a slight change of heart regarding Elvis' performance of "Unchained Melody" in Rapid City. In the book, I mention this:

"Nonetheless, Schilling bent a bit where 'Unchained Melody' was concerned. While producing the video retrospective Elvis: The Great Performances, he was asked to view the 'Unchained Melody' clip. Although initially skeptical, he agreed to watch it. 'I got choked up until I cried, and I said it is one of the great performances, and I don’t believe in changing history.' He included it in the video but still believes 'there was nothing creative' in the TV special. 'That was a money date.'”

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Mon Sep 29, 2014 4:17 am

For those of you already slagging a book you haven't read, how many of you have actually written a book about anything? I would like to know so I can read your book on whatever topic it is so I can give an opinion on it. Do you know how hard it is to write a book? The hours of research, interviews, and writing? Seriously? I'm personally looking forward to it and will be happy to give my informed assessment AFTER I've read it.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Mon Sep 29, 2014 5:21 am

johngael wrote:For those of you already slagging a book you haven't read, how many of you have actually written a book about anything? I would like to know so I can read your book on whatever topic it is so I can give an opinion on it. Do you know how hard it is to write a book? The hours of research, interviews, and writing? Seriously? I'm personally looking forward to it and will be happy to give my informed assessment AFTER I've read it.

Right on. If yo don't want it don't buy it , sheesh.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Mon Sep 29, 2014 6:05 am

Thanks guys. I hope to post some excerpts and blogs in the coming weeks.

A lot of people are asking for the Kindle e-book edition; I've been told that should be up by October 10, but I'll keep checking.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Mon Sep 29, 2014 8:49 pm

New blog up today:

http://allenwienerblog.blogspot.com/201 ... elvis.html

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 12:00 am

Channeling Elvis wrote:To answer one of the questions above regarding what is new in the book: First, I conducted some 40 interviews with people who performed with Elvis (Scotty Moore, D.J. Fontana, Glen D. Hardin, Joe Guercio, Gordon Stoker, Bobby Ogdin, et al) or knew him well (like Jerry Schilling) as well as those outside of Elvis' group who produced, directed, or performed on those TV shows (Steve Allen, Imogene Coca, Steve Binder, Bones Howe, Marty Pasetta, et al). This gave me two points of view: from those inside Elvis' circle and those outside of it.

Second, I had no intention of reinventing the wheel and doing another full bio of the King. Instead, I wanted to look at his 20-year performing career (1956-1977) as a national star, trace how he got there, and how that career played out. I reviewed hours of TV footage and much other footage of him on stage, both officially released and not-officially-released. Elvis was perhaps the most famous, recognizable entertainer of the 20th century, yet surprisingly little official footage was shot of him, outside of the TV shows. There are the 2 1970s documentary films and some stuff from the Tupelo 1956 shows, an early, silent color clip and maybe a bit more stuff, which I'm sure most of you have seen, but not much else. No one had ever tried to look at Elvis' career through images of him actually doing what he loved most: performing live! By tracing the arc of his career through the TV shows, I thought I could capture a new view of it. After all, he really wasn't well known outside the south prior to his first TV appearances in early 1956. By the autumn of that year, the entire country, and much of the world, knew who he was, had seen him, and heard his records. Few events of the latter 20th century were as eagerly anticipated, talked about, and argued about, as his debut on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1956. That's quite a quantum leap in just a few months. His eleven TV appearances that year (not counting the Hy Gardner interview show or the final Sullivan show in 1957) are the only way I know of to recreate the impact Elvis had so quickly and what it looked like. The harder part was trying to convey what the United States was like in 1956, the midst of the conservative Eisenhower years, when a guy who looked and performed like Elvis really alarmed adult America, while simultaneously lighting a fire under the kids, and igniting the rock 'n' roll era, which is still going and still owes much to the King.

Third, in reviewing the literature, I found very little information about Elvis' final TV appearance, Elvis In Concert. Perhaps this is because the program has never been officially released on video and was only shown a few times on TV before largely vanishing into bootleg land. As I'm sure most of you have done, I spent much time viewing the two officially taped concerts that were used to create that special, as well as the special itself. I spent a lot more time viewing all of the concert footage I could get from 1969-1977, all of it unofficial stuff (beside the footage from That's the Way It Is and Elvis on Tour, and more recently released stuff, like Prince from Another Planet). I used that as a base on which to evaluate Elvis In Concert, while also retracing the King's performing career during the last 8 years of his life. That alone only told me so much, but I also spent a lot of time interviewing Gary Smith and Dwight Hemion, who produced and directed the show, Andy Zall who edited it, and others, including members of Elvis' band. Hemion was in the unique position of having directed the Steve Allen Show when Elvis appeared on it as well as this final show, so his perspective was very interesting. I spend nearly 3 chapters on that special alone and I think much of it will be quite new to readers, even long-time Elvis fans. Similarly, I found a lot that was new to me about the Aloha from Hawaii special, even after reading about it in other books and I spend two of the longer chapters describing what happened to that special and how the concert itself differed from the televised special that most people saw, especially the bloated version aired in the U.S. months after the concert had been taped.

Although this is not a Presley biography, I did attempt to fill in the long gaps between his TV appearances, which were often years apart. I inserted chapters that bridge those periods by filling in essential information about what Elvis was doing during those times. These include chapters on his military service, his years spent in Hollywood, and his years on stage after he returned to live performances. These chapters lend greater perspective to the television shows by putting them in the broader context of his career. Television captured him at major moments when his career took sharp turns in various directions. Television also has left us the most coherent visual record of his performing style and ability throughout his career.

Allen


Hi Allen -

Appreciate the reply.

Looking at your interview subjects, this is a project a long time coming, as more than a few of these people passed away a long time ago. For example, Steve Allen died in 2000, Imogene Coca in 2001. Dwight Hemion passed in 2008, and we lost Gordon Stoker in 2013. Did you have the book project in mind fourteen years ago?

One point of concern, is that I question whether Dwight Hemion directed the 7-01-1956 broadcast of "The Steve Allen Show." He directed Allen in the Monday-Friday "Tonight Show," and later is credited for handling episodes of the final Allen NBC season in 1959-1960, done in Los Angeles and called "The Steve Allen Plymouth Show," but the Sunday night variety program seems to be unclear. Where did you determine Hemion was there for the Presley appearance in 1956?

I did learn, though, that Hemion and his producing partner, Gary Smith, moved to England in 1972 to produce TV specials for ATV, and worked there as well for U.S. specials. For "Elvis In Concert" they not only edited the program in the U.K., but also had apparently wanted to expand the program from sixty to ninety minutes.

Thank God their pitch to CBS was not accepted.


770921_St. Petersburg Evening Independent p 8-B.JPG
St. Petersburg Evening Independent - Wednesday, September 21, 1977
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 12:40 am

Channeling Elvis wrote:......I don't think the Allen show was the first time he was challenged by the TV cameras

Thanks. I didn't say he was challenged by the TV cameras. I said in front of TV cameras:

mike edwards66 wrote:.........Elvis was to be challenged in front of TV cameras.


I suggest that the first time Elvis was challenged in front of TV cameras, was by Steve Allen. Elvis, of course, rose to the challenge, and ended up enjoying the experience.

By the time of the "Range Rounup", Elvis had, as Peter Guralnick put it ".....entered into the spirit of fun, beating out a rythm easily on the body of his guitar, throwing a couple of patented, self-referential moves into his cowboy sashay, and singing out his lines with good humor........"

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 5:22 am

Ah, some great questions!

First, yes, indeed, this project began around 1999-2000 while I was doing a series of articles on Elvis' early years for Discoveries magazine, which I believe has now been subsumed by Goldmine. I did most of the interviews over the next two years, taping all of them, and had written (as I recall) roughly up to or including the Sinatra chapter when I started floating the idea to agents and publishers, none of whom had any interest in it. I dropped it for years while I worked on other projects, including two other books that have since been published. I returned to the project about two years ago. I am glad that I did all those interviews earlier, not realizing it would be 15 years before the book would be completed and never thinking that many of my subjects would either die or age to the point where they didn't want to be interviewed anymore.

Dwight Hemion did, indeed, direct the Allen show, which can clearly be seen in the closing credits of the program. Allen was very generous with his time and resources and sent me a VHS copy of the entire show. And, of course, both he and Hemion spoke at some length about Hemion's direction of the show and their ideas about using the dog during "Hound Dog," which I relate in detail.

I don't want to cast aspersions on the people who wrote that 1977 article, but it is filled with erroneous info. First, the show was shot and edited in the United States by Smith, Hemion and their staff. I interviewed Andy Zall, who edited Elvis In Concert, at some length and got some interesting information from him, including how both the Omaha and Rapid City shows were used in the final cut, despite a general belief that most, if not all, of the Omaha show was scrapped. The idea of Smith or Hemion suggesting a 90-minute show is ludicrous. First, the show had already been slugged for a one-hour slot by CBS. Second, Smith and Hemion were actually seriously concerned about how they were going to manage to fill the one-hour slot! They had seen Elvis perform in Chicago earlier that year as preparation for the shoot and were seriously alarmed by his appearance and performance. Smith actually said that, as bad as the Omaha show was, he thought Chicago was worse. It was in Chicago that he got the idea of making the special more of documentary about Elvis and his fans and how that relationship played out at his concerts, which resulted in much air time being spent on interview footage and scenes in and around the arena, and an interview segment with Vernon shot in June (the second Vernon segment, shot after Elvis died, was added during some additional editing that followed Elvis' death).

Hemion and Smith both were vacationing in Europe when word of Elvis' death reached them. Smith (not Hemion) was called back to make some changes in the show that would acknowledge the King's passing, including a stop in Memphis to shoot the brief statement by Vernon. Meanwhile, Andy Zall told me that two songs that were originally in the special were cut, one of them to provide time for Vernon's closing statement (no one could recall which songs were cut). There was a hasty meeting with CBS and Smith during which the idea of canceling or postponing the special in light of Elvis' death was discussed, but no one pushed for either and there was general agreement to go ahead with the scheduled telecast on October 3, 1977, which had already been set and was on the CBS schedule. Smith suggested that, rather than postponing or canceling, they air the special as a tribute to Elvis, in his memory. The little card with Elvis' birth and death dates at the start of the show was Smith's idea. He told me that it was only then that he learned what Elvis' birth date was and realized that he had been born one day earlier.

By the way, Smith had some hilarious stories about the Colonel that I think you'll enjoy.

I would never disagree with Peter Guralnick on Elvis, but I think he was giving his impression of how Elvis looked on the Steve Allen show. He looked very relaxed, smiled a lot, and appeared to be enjoying himself, but his real attitude about the show could not have been less like that. According to Scotty, D.J., and Gordon Stoker, he hated every minute of it, believed he was deliberately being humiliated and ridiculed, and despised the show for the rest of his life.

Here's an excerpt from my book about this:

". . . Elvis resented Steve Allen’s treatment of him for the rest of his life, forever seeing his appearance that night as a public humiliation. To the day he died, he forbade those around him from mentioning the incident. 'He never viewed that again, and we never even saw it until after his death,' Jordanaire Gordon Stoker said. 'He hated it and cussed that thing. You just didn’t mention it around him, period. It would piss him off even to mention it.' In a 1972 interview, sixteen years after the fact, Presley criticized 'Steve Allen’s humor. To me it was about as funny as a crutch'. . . .”

So Mike is right; that was the first time Elvis was challenged on TV in that way. I was thinking of his general discomfort with TV from the beginning, and also the nightmare version of "Heartbreak Hotel" on Stage Show when the Dorsey orchestra attempted to play along with him and, in the process, created a musical train wreck. But Elvis got on well with the Dorseys (despite their dislike of his music), Milton Berle, and Ed Sullivan during that first year on TV. Only the Allen show left a bad taste.

Allen

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 6:58 am

Channeling Elvis wrote:Ah, some great questions!

First, yes, indeed, this project began around 1999-2000 while I was doing a series of articles on Elvis' early years for Discoveries magazine, which I believe has now been subsumed by Goldmine. I did most of the interviews over the next two years, taping all of them, and had written (as I recall) roughly up to or including the Sinatra chapter when I started floating the idea to agents and publishers, none of whom had any interest in it. I dropped it for years while I worked on other projects, including two other books that have since been published. I returned to the project about two years ago. I am glad that I did all those interviews earlier, not realizing it would be 15 years before the book would be completed and never thinking that many of my subjects would either die or age to the point where they didn't want to be interviewed anymore.

Dwight Hemion did, indeed, direct the Allen show, which can clearly be seen in the closing credits of the program. Allen was very generous with his time and resources and sent me a VHS copy of the entire show. And, of course, both he and Hemion spoke at some length about Hemion's direction of the show and their ideas about using the dog during "Hound Dog," which I relate in detail.


Thank you.

To my knowledge, the entire show is not known to exist in collector's circles. And the general quality of the kinescope segments we have is fair, at best. Any chance you can share your gift from Steve Allen with the fans, perhaps via contacting Elvis Presley Enterprises?


Channeling Elvis wrote:I don't want to cast aspersions on the people who wrote that 1977 article, but it is filled with erroneous info. First, the show was shot and edited in the United States by Smith, Hemion and their staff. I interviewed Andy Zall, who edited Elvis In Concert, at some length and got some interesting information from him, including how both the Omaha and Rapid City shows were used in the final cut, despite a general belief that most, if not all, of the Omaha show was scrapped. The idea of Smith or Hemion suggesting a 90-minute show is ludicrous. First, the show had already been slugged for a one-hour slot by CBS. Second, Smith and Hemion were actually seriously concerned about how they were going to manage to fill the one-hour slot! They had seen Elvis perform in Chicago earlier that year as preparation for the shoot and were seriously alarmed by his appearance and performance. Smith actually said that, as bad as the Omaha show was, he thought Chicago was worse. It was in Chicago that he got the idea of making the special more of documentary about Elvis and his fans and how that relationship played out at his concerts, which resulted in much air time being spent on interview footage and scenes in and around the arena, and an interview segment with Vernon shot in June (the second Vernon segment, shot after Elvis died, was added during some additional editing that followed Elvis' death).

Hemion and Smith both were vacationing in Europe when word of Elvis' death reached them. Smith (not Hemion) was called back to make some changes in the show that would acknowledge the King's passing, including a stop in Memphis to shoot the brief statement by Vernon. Meanwhile, Andy Zall told me that two songs that were originally in the special were cut, one of them to provide time for Vernon's closing statement (no one could recall which songs were cut). There was a hasty meeting with CBS and Smith during which the idea of canceling or postponing the special in light of Elvis' death was discussed, but no one pushed for either and there was general agreement to go ahead with the scheduled telecast on October 3, 1977, which had already been set and was on the CBS schedule. Smith suggested that, rather than postponing or canceling, they air the special as a tribute to Elvis, in his memory. The little card with Elvis' birth and death dates at the start of the show was Smith's idea. He told me that it was only then that he learned what Elvis' birth date was and realized that he had been born one day earlier.

By the way, Smith had some hilarious stories about the Colonel that I think you'll enjoy.


If you revisit the article you'll see it is written by long-time Detroit Free Press entertainment columnist Shirley Eder.

It was syndicated across the U.S. for years, and she was known for her integrity. It is surprising to note your claim that everything she writes about the 1977 TV Special is inaccurate. She met and knew everyone, including Elvis Presley.


690801_W Shirley Eder_Las Vegas.JPG
With Shirley Eder, Las Vegas - Friday, August 1, 1969

More on Shirley Eder:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0249166/bio
http://articles.latimes.com/2005/jun/03/local/me-passings3.1
http://www.amazon.com/Not-this-time-Cary-Grant/dp/0385028547



Channeling Elvis wrote:I would never disagree with Peter Guralnick on Elvis, but I think he was giving his impression of how Elvis looked on the Steve Allen show. He looked very relaxed, smiled a lot, and appeared to be enjoying himself, but his real attitude about the show could not have been less like that. According to Scotty, D.J., and Gordon Stoker, he hated every minute of it, believed he was deliberately being humiliated and ridiculed, and despised the show for the rest of his life.


The Guralnick quote you see is misrepresentative of his take on the appearance, which actually aligns with your view. That other member is convinced that Allen loved Elvis, loved having him do his new music on the program, and Elvis loved the "challenge" presented to him. In other words, he's a Glenn Altschuler devotee. So he selected that passage to support his corner-case belief.
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Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 11:13 am

In any event, please let us know when the Kindle version is available. Thanks. I really want to read it!

rjm

Sent via mobile

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 12:35 pm

rjm wrote:In any event, please let us know when the Kindle version is available. Thanks. I really want to read it!

Me too.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:32 pm

I was very surprised that the Allen show had never shown up in collectors circles. I have no rights to the show and the copy I received is a "viewer's copy" that has numbers on the screen and would not really be suitable for commercial release. I'm also surprised that EPE hasn't reached out to Allen's office and sought a way to obtain and release the show on video.

I can't account for Eder's column and can only guess (and it is just a guess) that the info she got at that point (not long after Elvis' death and less than a month before the special was aired) may have gotten muddled. I don't know how available Smith or Hemion would have been at the time. I can only tell you what I learned from my own research & interviews. It's surprising that Colonel elected to put Elvis on television at that point in his career when he was clearly performing at a sub-par level. Looking at the two concerts that were filmed, I think Smith & Hemion would have been hard-pressed to stretch that to 90 minutes. As it is, the 50-or-so air minutes are filled with a lot of non-concert interview footage. Ironically, Steve Binder pushed hard to get the '68 "comeback" special expanded to 90 minutes and he had an edit ready to go (75 minutes of air time, as I recall, which has been issued on video), but was overruled and had to keep it to the one-hour time slot. At one point, he also considered using nothing but the pit segments in the special and was happy when HBO aired the "One Night With You" special that was an hour's worth of only pit stuff.

I think the Allen show is pretty complex and not as black and white as it's usually portrayed. I spend two chapters on it, let everyone have their say, and formed my own conclusions about it. I don't think Steve Allen intended to embarrass Elvis and neither did the rest of Elvis' group (Scotty, D.J., Stoker), but they were aware that Elvis was very unhappy with the way Allen was presenting him. They urged Elvis to tell Allen that and reminded him that he was a star, a guest, and had all the power in the world to weigh in on how he would perform. But Elvis refused to say anything and went along with it in silence. Allen swore that he had no idea that Elvis was so unhappy with the show, and I believe him. However, Allen did do an awful lot of backpedaling in later years, after the show became so controversial, and changed his story a few times. For one thing, he told me that he was totally unaware of the controversy that followed Elvis' performance of "Hound Dog" on Milton Berle's show. Really, Steve???? Are you kidding me???? NO ONE was unaware of that, least of all TV people. He even spoke openly about the Berle show on the "Tonight" show, prior to Elvis' appearance with him and was quoted in newspapers regarding Elvis' upcoming appearance. Elvis' attitude about the experience is better detected from Hy Gardner's TV interview with him later that evening on "Hy Gardner Calling!" than his performance with Allen. After all, Elvis was a pro and he wasn't going to perform as anything less on a national TV show, but he was himself on Gardner's show. Although he didn't criticize Allen or anyone else to Gardner, he was clearly worn out by the Allen experience and somewhat confused about why he had become and object of controversy and criticism.

Oh - regarding the Kindle edition: I spoke to them yesterday and they are still looking at October 10 as the date for its release. I'll let you know if I hear anything different. I'm really surprised that so many people are asking for the Kindle. Times have changed!

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:42 pm

Channeling Elvis wrote:I was very surprised that the Allen show had never shown up in collectors circles. I have no rights to the show and the copy I received is a "viewer's copy" that has numbers on the screen and would not really be suitable for commercial release. I'm also surprised that EPE hasn't reached out to Allen's office and sought a way to obtain and release the show on video.

I can't account for Eder's column and can only guess (and it is just a guess) that the info she got at that point (not long after Elvis' death and less than a month before the special was aired) may have gotten muddled. I don't know how available Smith or Hemion would have been at the time. I can only tell you what I learned from my own research & interviews. It's surprising that Colonel elected to put Elvis on television at that point in his career when he was clearly performing at a sub-par level. Looking at the two concerts that were filmed, I think Smith & Hemion would have been hard-pressed to stretch that to 90 minutes. As it is, the 50-or-so air minutes are filled with a lot of non-concert interview footage. Ironically, Steve Binder pushed hard to get the '68 "comeback" special expanded to 90 minutes and he had an edit ready to go (75 minutes of air time, as I recall, which has been issued on video), but was overruled and had to keep it to the one-hour time slot. At one point, he also considered using nothing but the pit segments in the special and was happy when HBO aired the "One Night With You" special that was an hour's worth of only pit stuff.

I think the Allen show is pretty complex and not as black and white as it's usually portrayed. I spend two chapters on it, let everyone have their say, and formed my own conclusions about it. I don't think Steve Allen intended to embarrass Elvis and neither did the rest of Elvis' group (Scotty, D.J., Stoker), but they were aware that Elvis was very unhappy with the way Allen was presenting him. They urged Elvis to tell Allen that and reminded him that he was a star, a guest, and had all the power in the world to weigh in on how he would perform. But Elvis refused to say anything and went along with it in silence. Allen swore that he had no idea that Elvis was so unhappy with the show, and I believe him. However, Allen did do an awful lot of backpedaling in later years, after the show became so controversial, and changed his story a few times. For one thing, he told me that he was totally unaware of the controversy that followed Elvis' performance of "Hound Dog" on Milton Berle's show. Really, Steve???? Are you kidding me???? NO ONE was unaware of that, least of all TV people. He even spoke openly about the Berle show on the "Tonight" show, prior to Elvis' appearance with him and was quoted in newspapers regarding Elvis' upcoming appearance. Elvis' attitude about the experience is better detected from Hy Gardner's TV interview with him later that evening on "Hy Gardner Calling!" than his performance with Allen. After all, Elvis was a pro and he wasn't going to perform as anything less on a national TV show, but he was himself on Gardner's show. Although he didn't criticize Allen or anyone else to Gardner, he was clearly worn out by the Allen experience and somewhat confused about why he had become and object of controversy and criticism.

Oh - regarding the Kindle edition: I spoke to them yesterday and they are still looking at October 10 as the date for its release. I'll let you know if I hear anything different. I'm really surprised that so many people are asking for the Kindle. Times have changed!


Any idea what the setlist/setup for the 90 minute version of EIC would be?

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:45 pm

Meanwhile, any thoughts or reactions to the Barbra Streisand "duet" with Elvis on "Love Me Tender," from her new Partners album? Here's an item about the success she's having with the album, which (kind of) puts Elvis back on the charts again.

http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/567988/2 ... Cqz80sQdG4

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:47 pm

Johnny2523 wrote:
Any idea what the setlist/setup for the 90 minute version of EIC would be?


I don't think there ever was one; no idea where the story came from.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 4:54 pm

Channeling Elvis wrote:
Johnny2523 wrote:
Any idea what the setlist/setup for the 90 minute version of EIC would be?


I don't think there ever was one; no idea where the story came from.


For my taste, If you love me let me know, and Unchained Melody should have been included at least, Considering both were from his latest album ''Moody Blue''.

Re: New Book -Channeling Elvis

Tue Sep 30, 2014 5:00 pm

The absence of "Unchained Melody" is a real puzzler. For me, it is a high point of those concerts, despite Elvis' diminished abilities. I feel the same way about it that Jerry Schilling did, once he sat down and watched it. No one seemed to know why the number wasn't included, but Zall and Smith suggested it might have been because they thought "My Way" was better and "Unchained Melody" was thus not needed. It was left off the album, too, and relegated to a single that didn't even chart. I think you need the visual with the song to feel the real power of the moment.