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Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 21, 2016 6:37 am

At the University of Kent next year, there is an academic conference about how Elvis has continued to be successful since his death both from the point of view of his music (the releasing of unheard performances etc) and as a commodity (Graceland, exhibitions, egg cups - whatever). I have put forward to do a paper, but won't know until the new year whether or not it is accepted. However, it will probably get written either way.

I would like, if possible, to get input from yourselves as well via the ten-question survey below. I'm posting this now rather than later as it seems to be a time when people are talking about the good, bad and the ugly of posthumous release on the board anyway, from the discussion of the West Texas FTD, through to the recent threads on Collector's Gold, and also, of course, the RPO albums.

So, if you have time, and can answer the following ten questions, I would be very thankful. I have tried not to make them leading in any way.

You are welcome to post your answers here, or within a private message to me if you prefer your views to not be known amongst other members. Answers given will be used anonymously in any paper or article.

Please note that all questions are about OFFICIAL releases and not bootlegs.

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

Thank you for your time.

I should add that, beyond thanking people, I won't be getting involved in discussions about answers given on here.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 21, 2016 7:41 am

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
At the time I can remember that the "Legendary Performer" releases were the only ones I expected to have any outtakes/unreleased material to be released on the official label (RCA).

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
1977 because all the material was being re-released because of his death, and was for the first time I could remember all the soundtracks as well as the studio, and live LP's were all in one place for sale at the same time .

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.
That would have to be 'The Complete 50's Masters" as well as the 60's and 70's boxes. These opened a lot of doors to the newer fans who for the first time got to hear all his studio work in the order it was recorded and shown how he had progressed musically through-out all those decades.

4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
Most have been professionally presented in a historically aspect such as "A Prince From Another Planet" as an example.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
That would all depend on subject and quality..

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
The material that is being offered by FTD would not make sense on a buisness level to be released mainstream since the interest in such material is limited to a hardcore fan base of listeners and collectors. If they were to end the series today I think we have received more material than anyone would have expected.

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.
No

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
The quality is not there on Youtube and I don't believe by any means that those who have uploaded these FTD releases will cause those who watch and listen not to buy the product or keep any from buying who collects it just for that reason.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?
It's not hurting the original masters in any way, they are still safely sitting in the vaults. If if causes someone to like a particular song because of a newer feel or sound that's not hurting the legacy by no means.

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.
I think they are what keeps Elvis alive. They are what keeps the fans interested and certianly the reason we have FECC. :wink:

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 21, 2016 10:13 am

Answers in-line.


poormadpeter2 wrote:At the University of Kent next year, there is an academic conference about how Elvis has continued to be successful since his death both from the point of view of his music (the releasing of unheard performances etc) and as a commodity (Graceland, exhibitions, egg cups - whatever). I have put forward to do a paper, but won't know until the new year whether or not it is accepted. However, it will probably get written either way.

I would like, if possible, to get input from yourselves as well via the ten-question survey below. I'm posting this now rather than later as it seems to be a time when people are talking about the good, bad and the ugly of posthumous release on the board anyway, from the discussion of the West Texas FTD, through to the recent threads on Collector's Gold, and also, of course, the RPO albums.

So, if you have time, and can answer the following ten questions, I would be very thankful. I have tried not to make them leading in any way.

You are welcome to post your answers here, or within a private message to me if you prefer your views to not be known amongst other members. Answers given will be used anonymously in any paper or article.

Please note that all questions are about OFFICIAL releases and not bootlegs.

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

In 1977, I didn't know much about possibilities of unreleased material. In 1978, I began to discover the import LP world, and soon realized there was a LOT of material RCA either didn't possess, or didn't plan to release. The official releases that year were ... uninspired at best. The following year was even less so. At that point, my searching for releases of outtakes, concerts, or rehearsals was strictly via the underground. RCA had nothing to offer.


2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?

Within the first ten years of Ernst Jørgensen's hiring as producer. His analysis of retail titles, research and recovery of lost session reels, savvy compilations and stunning box sets, and creation of the collector's label allowed the Presley recordings to finally be seen as a series of artistic achievements, and helped to restore the musical legacy as extremely valuable.


3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

Way, way too many to name. Among the most notable:

- Tiger Man (RCA) / Memories: The '68 Comeback Special (RCA)
- A Boy From Tupelo (FTD)
- Elvis The King of Rock 'N' Roll: The Complete '50s Masters (RCA)
- Rock Around The Bloch (FTD)
- The Complete Elvis Presley Masters (RCA)
- Jailhouse Rock Volume 2 (FTD)
- ELV1S: 30 #1 Hits (RCA)
- From Elvis In Memphis (FTD) / Back In Memphis (FTD) / From Elvis At American Sound Studios (FTD)
- Elvis Aron Presley (RCA)
- In A Private Moment (FTD)
- Elvis: A Golden Celebration (RCA)
- Writing For The King (FTD)
- Young Man With The Big Beat (RCA)
- Elvis Is Back! (FTD)
- From Nashville to Memphis: The Essential '60s Masters (RCA)
- The Return To Vegas (FTD)
- Elvis at Sun (RCA) / The Complete Million Dollar Quartet (RCA)
- Elvis Presley (FTD)

These either broke new ground in terms of Presley releases, sold incredibly well to garner attention, compiled a session and/or era in superb fashion, top-to-bottom, represented a musical high-water mark, or all of the above.



4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc

It's done as well as possible in terms of 21st century retail realities.


5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

I get them all.


6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

FTD is the best thing to happen to Elvis' music in the past 17 years. The label has expanded our knowledge of Presley's creative process while giving an even sharper focus on how the magic happened. I don't see much fault with their release process, pricing or selections. And the fact that the label is keeping in print material that otherwise would be officially unavailable is simply wonderful. Bottom line: enjoy it while it lasts.


7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

Not yet.


8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

YouTube videos are a very small percentage of what is out there in terms of outtakes or official material. Torrent sites which cannibalize entire official releases the day they appear and put them up for downloading are far more damaging. It hinders a company's interest in supporting more releases by a legacy artist, especially if a great financial investment had been made on the product. The thievery of official audio by grey market labels serve the same nefarious purpose, and ultimately hurts what may be issued in the future.


9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

If done with respect and care, and garners fresh ears and eyes, it is a good thing.


10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

There's not too much left to say, forty years after his death.


Thank you for your time.

I should add that, beyond thanking people, I won't be getting involved in discussions about answers given on here.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 21, 2016 3:13 pm

Had a go. hope its useful


1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
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I hoped for them but assumed from comments that came out in the Elvis Monthly that there was very little in the way of new songs. I did know that there were unreleased concerts from the Having Fun On Stage record although at the time I knew nothing about soundboards or multi tracks but i hoped that would be the source for "new" material. I also believed that he may have recorded other studio tracks that had yet to be discovered; albeit I had hoped for whole sessions!



2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
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Probably the 90's at retail and the release of the 50's/60's/70's box sets and the Elvis in the 90's campaign. Double feature soundtracks and the other box sets like Platinum, Close Up etc


3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.
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The first demos...My Happiness etc
Shake Rattle and Roll / Fool Fool Fool tracks Hayride material (Tweedle Dee, Maybelline, Little Mama etc)
The TV Shows 56-57
Movie soundtrack finds Danny, Plantation Rock, Black Star, I'm a Roustabout, Youre The Boss, Lady Loves Me et al
The Lost Album rightfully compiling the 63 /64 sessions to an album that could/should have been
Ditto "Elvis Sings Guitar Man" FTD released retail (sort of ) as "Tomorrow is a Long Time"
Tiger Man
Standing Room Only FTD giving an insight as to what could have been
Elvis at Stax-long overdue re-appraisal of some of my favourite and often overlooked tracks
Jungle Room Sessions FTD / Way Down In The Jungle Room. FTD for being the first to show Elvis in a different light to what I had always believed


4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
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I have liked and enjoyed the Legacy releases but would like to see sets that celebrate other aspects of his career i.e 53-55, TV Shows, Movie Outakes/actual soundtrack versions, a proper Comeback set 66-69 etc. At general retail level though there are plenty of options to purchase the standard catalogue at a reasonable price


5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
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Available funds mean I have to pick an choose and there have been FTD's such as Hits Of 70's, This is Elvis, Xmas Album and others that have not offered anything new so I have passed on. Studio recordings, rehearsals are my priority. Soundboards have to have rare songs or be well reviewed performance and quality wise before I will buy. I would welcome more live compilations with rare tracks (even audience recordings)


6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
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FTD has been a revelation but some live soundboards have been poor and have deterred me from buying them without knowing about the standard of performance and audio. I do feel the cost of the FTD's could be reduced for single disc soundboards. Missed opportunities Box Sets, More Opening Night-Closing Night sets, Movie Soundtrack Versions set, TTWII Rehearsals, On Tour outtakes, Last Concert. I have no problem with outlets


7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.
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No although some better shows from 76 / 77 could have been chosen. they exist

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
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Its the way of the world but I dont think it impacts because only people who are interested watch the stuff anyway. And they are the same people who would buy the material if its available in better quality or better format.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

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no problem as long as it is done sympathetically and I do feel it helps bring in new fans and keeps Elvis current. its helped to make available otherwise little known tracks to the general public. I would like to see more sets with a themed overdub i.e bluegrass/country, rock, roots and a producer like Rick Rubin bought in. Also utilise home recorded tapes, live songs, outakes to form new tracks

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

Other artists have had Official Bootleg Series released mainstream. The Essential series came close to that but I think the market would better accept them now

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 21, 2016 3:19 pm

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
When Elvis died, my first reaction was that I would never hear anything new. Then we were bombarded with a huge number of song titles that were said to be unreleased, although only a handful were correct. My thoughts then were that we would get a trickle of out-takes as proved true in those first couple of years after he was gone.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
I think that would apply to the present day. I know all of Elvis' original albums are not available to buy individually but retailers cannot and would not contemplate stocking that many titles. We have the Legacy series and the box sets available cheaper than ever, plus the big box of albums should people want to indulge that deeply.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.
Elvis - A legendary Performer Vol.3 (1978)
Elvis Aron Presley (1980)
The Million Dollar Quartet (1981)
Essential Elvis (1988)
Essential Elvis Vol.2 (1989)
Essential Elvis Vol.3 (1990)
Collectors Gold (1990)
The Complete Fifties Masters (1992)
An Afternoon In The Garden (1997)
Elvis at Sun (2004)


4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
I think it is as good as the retail market will stand. Unfortunately the market in Europe is bogged down with public domain releases which confuse the general public.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
I buy as many as finances will allow, that is the only reason I pick and choose. My favourites are those in the Classic Album series.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
Although hard to keep up with the release schedule, I do not think there have been too many releases. All things considered, I do think that FTD releases offer value for money, when they started issuing 2-CD sets the price remained the same as the single discs. Thinking about missed opportunities, I would have liked stand alone CD releases of the 1961 Hawaiian concert and the Sun material released on A Boy From Tupelo. FTD releases are available from a multitude of mail order companies, even Amazon, so people should have no problem in tracking them down.

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.
Not so far.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
I don't think the perception of Elvis by the general public will be lowered by hearing anything he said or sang, any damage has already been done by the fat man in a jumpsuit stereotype and television programmes that only ever focus on one thing, the circumstances of his death.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?
They are not particularly to my taste, but they do get Elvis back into the charts and raise his profile through reason of his music which can only ever be a good thing.

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.
People love to throw stones at EPE/RCA/BMG/Sony but considering how long ago it is since Elvis last recorded, I think the fans have been well served by those in charge of his catalogue of recordings.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 21, 2016 4:38 pm

I was outside of the States for summer vacation 1977. When Elvis died I naively assumed that his last record was FEPB. A bittersweet surprise in September when I discovered a new album that went by the name of the single I had purchased that last December of 1976!

Fast forward to 1980 with (in my case) "A Legendary Performer Volume 3" under my belt (with absolutely zero knowledge of bootlegs). The 8 LP set titled Elvis Aron Presley was a dream come true thanks to Joan Deary! With 65 unreleased performances to boot! I was saddened to read (cannot recall magazine review) that RCA had exhausted its vaults for this project.

I believe, it is beyond the wildest dreams of any fan, the immense amount of previously unreleased material from Elvis. Impossible to imagine then, that we would have so much at our disposal today. I try to remember this when the inevitable thirst or hunger for more, pops up in my head. For I remember only too well the 1980's and early 1990's, when there were YEARS (not months) between releases. The list for me to thank is not too long. But only one person (easily) is at the top of it for me. That person is Ernst Jorgensen. Thank you.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 21, 2016 7:36 pm

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

Whilst I was around, at 5 years of age, if anything, I must’ve thought that would be it.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?

For me it was from 1992 to the turn of the new century, CD was in its heyday and as well as remastering Elvis’ core catalogue with new bonus tracks in a more coherent way (side-lining the lesser soundtracks into their own series, compiling Christmas and Gospel sets away from the secular recordings) there seemed to be a plethora of new performances ie : Home Recordings, Matinee show at Madison Square Garden and the NBC special recordings.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

A Golden Celebration
Elvis Aron Presley
The King of Rock N Roll
Nashville to Memphis
Walk a Mile in My Shoes

The first two gave me recordings I never dreamed existed, the next three gave Elvis fans and the ‘casual fan/music lover’ an in depth appreciation of what made Elvis great in coherent fashion, in luxurious box sets with all fully remastered recordings.


4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc.

With the apparent decline of physical media, I think the current catalogues new releases are fantastic and more than could be asked for, what doesn’t help is the fact that many old versions of the same albums are also being repressed and still available at retail which could confuse the general buyer.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

I purchase all of the CD releases at the moment, because it’s financially possible. If anything, some of the books are the ones that I may skip on. I buy no vinyl at all.


6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

FTD is a godsend. Full stop. As a fan being selfish, of course I would like the multi-track recordings to be released over the soundboards. I do think they are value for money, naturally if they were cheaper, I wouldn’t complain! There’s no missed opportunities in my opinion and as for availability I have no issues. Again, in the current market of declining physical media sales, I'm just grateful I can pick these kind of releases up at all. Nothing lasts forever.

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

Frankly, no.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

If a person is interested in something, they’ll seek out the best bits and make up their own mind. I personally do not think this will harm the Elvis legacy, there’s too much positive stuff to wade through before you hit the lesser recordings.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

If it brings in new fans, great. If it brings in new fans, who then seek out the originals, even better. If even a portion of the profits in some way go back into maintaining the Elvis legacy, even better still. It's all good.

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

Keep ‘em coming, none of us are getting any younger!

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 21, 2016 9:48 pm

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
Not applicable, was just a young kid, not yet an Elvis enthusiast.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
It has never been well-organized. There have been periods of time where attempts have been made to give the catalogue coherence and greater accessibility. The late-1990’s Artist of The Century campaign period, and slightly before it, was probably the most aggressive attempt at establishing a sensible, organized catalogue – with very mixed results. Starting with An Afternoon At The Garden, there were a multitude of reissues of catalogue albums, soundtracks, classic box sets and hits collections with upgraded artwork, attempts at upgraded sound, and extended track-listings. Additionally, there were some well-done archival and expanded releases of major artistic achievements, regarded sessions, and projects such as: The Home Recordings; Essential Elvis Volumes 4-6; Suspicious Minds –The Memphis 1969 Anthology; Tiger Man; Memories – The ’68 Comeback Special; TTWII – Special Edition audio set. And of course, there were some very well-done box sets such as Platinum and Today, Tomorrow & Forever. That said, this catalogue reorganization campaign was somewhat abbreviated and never reached a conclusion, and ultimately left the overall catalogue in a perpetual disorganized state with a mixture of reissue product, new product, inferior CD pressings from the early 1990’s, and an obscene amount of hits and themed compilations. Nevertheless, for a few years, it seemed like BMG was headed in the right direction before reality set in.

A similar attempt at reorganizing the mainstream catalogue has taken place by Sony Legacy, and possibly in superior fashion due to the new reissues containing significant sonic improvements because of the highly skilled engineers working on the releases. Some choice titles have been expanded, and Sony has produced some intriguing box sets like Young Man With The Big Beat, That’s The Way It Is, and The RCA Albums Collection. That said, there has been too much of a focus on Elvis’ 1970’s period, and while a faction of the fan-base loves the final years, Elvis’ greatness is often better represented from prior eras. Additionally, the liner notes in many recent releases attempt to rewrite history, which is a disturbing development. Still, Sony should be commended for what it has started, particularly in an era where there are considerable limitations at retail.

So, which period is better? Probably the Sony Legacy period due to sound quality and aesthetics, but the late-90’s/early-00’s campaign had its successes as well.


3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

Tiger Man/Memories - The ’68 Comeback Special (BMG):
The two complete sit-down shows from Burbank 1968. Some of the finest rock and roll ever captured on tape. The artistry of Elvis Presley on full-display. The rest of the Comeback performances on the Memories set celebrating what became one of his greatest achievements as a vocalist and artist.

A Boy From Tupelo (FTD):
The book is an informative milestone about Elvis Presley’s foundational rise and one of the most important, crucial, pioneering periods in rock and roll history. The audio is an expansive presentation and celebration of this essential and critical period of Elvis’ artistry.

Elvis: A Golden Celebration (RCA/BMG):
A major archival breakthrough in the mid-1980’s when Elvis’ essential contributions to rock and roll history needed reevaluation and refocus by a faction of music scholars and the public, when his legacy needed to be rehabilitated due to the aftermath of Elvis In Concert and catalogue mismanagement.

Elvis Is Back! (FTD):
One of Elvis’ greatest albums, a session of dynamic vocal work, many vocal outtakes matching the master performances. A display of vocal virtuosity and a musical genius at work.

Young Man With The Big Beat (Sony):
A celebration of Elvis’ early genius as a recording artist and performer, when he was truly the King of Rock and Roll. The music in glorious sound.

Elvis Presley (FTD):
A seminal album in rock and roll history, expanded with session outtake material, showcasing the creative process of a rock and roll pioneer. Sound quality is sensational.

From Elvis In Memphis/Back In Memphis/From Elvis At American Sound (FTD):
Elvis’ last, truly great recording sessions from American Sound in Memphis, celebrated and spanning six discs. As a commercial artist, he fully rebounded from his artistic demise in Hollywood with these sessions.

The Complete Elvis Presley Masters (RCA/BMG):
A magnum opus of box sets at the time of its release. It has been superseded by subsequent releases of the same material, but its importance as a showcase for Elvis’ artistic achievement and legacy still makes it a very noteworthy title. It was a game-changer.

Today, Tomorrow & Forever (BMG):
This may not be the milestone other releases are, but it is important because it is one that provides an opportunity to see Elvis’ recording career through an alternate path. It is a back-channel route showcasing the artistic genius and creative process of Elvis Presley. An underrated, essential work.

In A Private Moment (FTD):
A rare, fairly expansive glimpse into one of music’s greatest, most perceptive interpreters of music. Elvis behind the scenes, in private exploring and celebrating music. Invaluable.

The Return To Vegas (FTD):
The closest document to Elvis’ opening night performance in Las Vegas 1969 that anyone has heard. An improvement on the bootleg. By the time RCA started recording a few weeks later, Elvis had already lost a bit of his edge – and this only shows how great this recording is because Elvis is sensational during the August RCA recordings. Elvis at his finest as a live performer.

The Wonder Of You (FTD):
This may not be the best of the August 1970 multitracks, but no other Elvis concert recording from the 1970’s is mixed as well as this show. Elvis’ live work from the 1970’s was a major part of his final chapter as an artist, and no release presents it as well. The balance of the instrumentation and large stage ensemble that is achieved is no small feat. This is Elvis in the 1970’s.

Elvis Aron Presley (RCA/BMG):
Flawed, yet very important. It assisted in laying a blue-print of what could be done with the archives, and also what not to do. Without it, there may not have been the subsequent Golden Celebration box set, which was an important, artistic milestone. The Hawaii live tape from 1961 is one of the greatest-ever archival Elvis gems ever issued.

Jailhouse Rock (FTD) and Loving You (FTD) have to be mentioned because Elvis was at his very best during that period and during those sessions. This music contributed to Elvis changing the world, and these FTD editions provide a treasured look into parts of the sessions and his exceptional talent.


4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
Acceptable. Discussed to some degree in answer number two.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
Typically acquire all of them. Only skipped the Best of British book series.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
FTD is the finest collectors label for one specific artist in the music industry, matched only by the archival work done by The Grateful Dead. Has every release been perfect? No. Have there been missed opportunities? Yes. Still, the overall amount of releases and depth of content is really astonishing. Too many releases? Not really, any serious fan of Elvis Presley should embrace the opportunity to be able to explore and analyze Elvis’ creative process. Granted, there are a couple of pointless titles like Hits Of The 70’s, which wasn’t even an accurate reissue, that serve little purpose, but for the most part, the expansive FTD catalogue is indispensable. The inner-workings of the distribution model have not been revealed to the public, and the label allegedly does not make much profit, so there are certainly rumors about why the retail pricing remains at a premium.

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.
There have been too many complete concert soundboards released from 1976. Elvis’s craft and live show had significantly deteriorated by 1976. In general, most of these concerts present Elvis at his worst. While it is important to represent all eras of Elvis’ musical career through FTD, greater care should be given to this challenging, unflattering period of work. Compilations in the style of Southern Nights or Spring Tours could do an effective job of extracting redeeming and salvageable moments from various tour shows while bypassing all the unappealing concert bloat in the process. A few complete concerts are fine, fourteen+ is a bit much.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
With or without FTD, archival performances were going to be widespread throughout sites like YouTube. If anything, at least the quality via a FTD source is going to be a respectable representation on a site like YouTube, which is less harmful to Elvis' legacy. Aside from most of the 1975-1977 soundboard material, many studio outtakes or live shows/tapes from the 1969-1973 period represent Elvis well. Now, with regard to illegal downloading of FTD product or the theft of FTD recordings by grey market labels, that is despicable, and much more egregious than a YouTube stream which does not have the same negative financial impact of future investment and production by FTD.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?
They serve a purpose. However, their appeal may have limited returns in the long run. If a casual consumer likes the sound and presentation of a manipulated Elvis recording, there is no guarantee he or she is going to find the original performances and overall standard body of work as accessible, and therefore may not delve much deeper in the catalogue.

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.
No.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey

Mon Nov 21, 2016 10:06 pm

Thanks for an interesting topic and here are my replies:

1 I was born late 1977 so no input.

2 I agree with the previous posters who claim that the catalogue was at its most coherent around the Artist of the Century campaign in 1999-2000. By then, most of the back catalogue had been re-released in upgraded versions. There seemed to be an enormous will from BMG's side to place Elvis at the very top. Unfortunately, BMG's campaign wasn't endorsed fully by the EPE and this led to some lost opportunities regarding video material.

3 For me personally and I believe also from an international perspective, it was definitely the release of The King of Rock n Roll - The Complete 50's Masters in the late summer of 1992. For once, BMG adopted a full scale promotional campaign which helped rekindling Elvis' flame. Prior to this release, almost nothing from RCA had been organized in terms of presenting a full-fledged product and most compilations looked like poor replicas of previos releases. Everything changed for the absolute best after this set. I'm forever grateful towards EJ, RS and BMG.

4 The Legacy releases are all great and the Sony engineers are doing fantastic jobs with the tape transfers to present an authentic sound as heard on the original RCA releases.

5 Initially I bought every FTD up until His Hand in Mine. I have developed a pick and choose mentality, mostly due to economic reasons, so I lack about 40 titles (including LPs and books). In all honesty, I don't miss any of the ones I don't have and I can definitely live without all the post-1973 soundboards.

6 As for value for money, definitely. At $ 30, we get 2CDs and a lovely booklet so we have nothing to complain about. Regarding the outlets, I think it is a way of also keeping the fan clubs active. It's a win-win situation.

7 In my opinion, there have been way too many post-1973 soundboard releases. Generally, these products do not show Elvis at his very best. Of course I am aware that there is an interest from the market but perhaps it would have been better to focus on quality rather than quantity.

8 Seeing how youtube has an enormous impact on today's youth, I think it's OK that some people pitch certain releases there. However, I can also understand that things like the ethnical dialogue during the 1974 summer season in Vegas can create problems.

9 I personally believe that the originals are already done and can never be improved. I have listened to most of those re-recordings and nothing is better than the original cuts. The market rules so I'm glad for Sony and EPE of course, but imho they are not interesting.

10 Let's hope EJ and RS keep on going a few more years, or at least through next year with the 40th memorial of Elvis' passing. Perhaps Sony has something cool planned!

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Tue Nov 22, 2016 1:38 am

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

Since I was just 11 at the time with virtually no money of my own the thought of future or unreleased material wasn't even a thought.I listened to what my older brothers and parents brought into the house.At that time,even for them,a previously released album that we hadn't heard yet was as good as unreleased material.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?

I think the Complete 50's box set was the point where it seemed as though Elvis was getting his due.Followed by the 60's and 70's sets and then the double feature which started putting the movie soundtracks in perspective.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

The Golden Celebration box.
Complete 50's Masters.
Jailhouse Rock Volume 2.
A Boy From Tupelo (FTD).
Elvis Is Back.
Elvis Aron Presley "Silver Box Set".
Elvis Presley.
68 Comeback Special Box.
From Elvis In Memphis(FTD).
The Complete Million Dollar Quartet.

I think these releases cover Elvis's most productive years.I think releases that contain many alternate versions of the same song would be mostly uninteresting to buyers in the mainstream.The releases where the target audience is in the mainstream very clearly outline the basic catalog and in a sense wets the whistle of the listener and then it's up to them to be satisfied with that or explore further into FTD land.

4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc

With The Golden Celebration,Elvis Aaron Presley and the 50's ,60's and 70's box sets,I think they have done an outstanding job of setting the record straight

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

When FTD started I bought every release and then had to slow down because they were coming out faster then the funds were.I've been playing catchup over the last year or 2 trying to fill in as much as possible. Having them all though would be the way to go if possible.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

There is much value for the money and I don't think there have been too many releases .I do wish some releases wouldn't be deleted so soon because there have been a couple missed opportunities .One being The Best Of British Vol 1.I think the FTD's being only available through certain outlets is fine for those who purchase them .They are very easy to locate and can still be found by the mainstream .

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

I've enjoyed every release I've heard so far.The alternative to complaining about what we have is complaining about not having any so I take every release as another gift.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

I think it is important.I think free downloads of FTD's cheapen the legacy of Elvis Presley.Elvis isn't a pile of songs to listen to and disguard when something new comes along.It's an unfolding story with each release.The hardcore fans understand this and respect the musical legacy of Elvis Presley the way it's meant to be enjoyed.Downloading just sucks the fun out of it.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

It all depends on how it's presented and sometimes time changes how they are heard.I didn't like the Elvis medley,I didn't like the Guitar Man album when it was first released but have since changed my mind.The RPO albums have so far,for the most part been well done.But in the end they help keep the fire burning.If they are done honestly and with the goal to present Elvis in the best light possible then I listen to them and give them a chance.

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

Just that every release is welcome.They all tell the story .Every release is one more release we didn't have before.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Tue Nov 22, 2016 9:07 pm

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
I was not alive in 1977. I was not born until 1988 and did not become an Elvis fan until 2001.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
Today, because nearly all of the masters and even many of the commercial box sets are available digitally for either purchase or streaming. It has never been easier or more affordable to dip into Elvis's catalogue and, particularly with the help of the internet, to understand when releases came out, why they included the songs they did, and additional information that was not originally present on the first releases e.g. session musicians, recording dates.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

Box Sets:
1. The King of Rock and Roll: The 50s Masters (1992)
2. The Complete Sun Sessions (1987)
3. The RCA Albums Collection (2016)

The King of Rock and Roll box set was a key release to start shifting public opinion on the topic of the merits of Elvis's music. While the Sun Sessions album in 1976 finally collected all of Elvis' Sun masters on a single album, it was the Complete Sun Sessions that really put the recordings into context and allowed listeners a fly on the wall experience to the early rumblings of rock and roll history. The Complete Masters was as close to a definitive collection of Elvis's works as I imagine the general public is likely to get, but I consider the RCA Albums Collection a better, more important collection because not only did it adhere to the original album structures (something that the Complete Masters did for its live tracks and got slammed for) but was substantially more affordable. Yes there were niggling things about it but as an overall work, taking into consideration presentation, affordability and the solid press surrounding its release, I feel the RCA Albums Collection was more important.

Albums:
1. Elvis 30 #1 Hits (2002)
2. Elvis at Sun (2004) -
3. The Complete Million Dollar Quartet (2006)

Elvis 30 #1 Hits has been, in my opinion, the single most important Elvis release of the 21st Century. Despite questionable replacements on a couple masters and some audio issues taken up by hardcore fans, 30 #1 Hits reasserted Elvis' relevance in the new millenium and to a new generation of listeners. Much like The Sun Sessions and The Complete Sun Sessions before it, Elvis at Sun was another step forward in the presentation of Elvis's Sun material, with superb quality on all of the recordings and best of all, widely available to the public. With a firm marketing push supported by the celebration of the That's All Right 50th and launch of Elvis Radio, Elvis at Sun was the foundation upon which the more complete but less accessible A Boy From Tupelo was built. Finally the legendary jam session was available "complete" instead of piecemeal. That it as a standard retail release and not a premium product was even better. The MDQ has only been received better with time and of course led to the smash musical and an upcoming miniseries. This was the perfect companion piece to any other "Complete" Elvis collection out there and helped highlight again the brilliant musicality of these young men.

Tracks:
1. My Happiness
2. A Little Less Conversation (JXL Remix)
3. Unchained Melody (Undubbed, Rapid City, June 21, 1977)

My Happiness, being the first recording Elvis ever made, was an important release historically and that's enough to justify that as "most important." A Little Less Conversation, like the album it appeared on, was a reassertion of Elvis's staying power in the next century, and set a precedent for risky remixes & re-arrangements that, while it had previously been undertaken to some success on Guitar Man and The Elvis Medley, really broke out to the mainstream here. ALLC paved the way directly for both successes like If I Can Dream, The Wonder of You and Christmas Duets, as well as flops like Viva Elvis. I picked Unchained Melody as my third most important because important is not the same as "good." Despite not being on either the Elvis in Concert album or TV special, its inclusion in The Great Performances video series led to an appreciation among fans that despite how rough things looked in 1977, mere weeks before his death, he certain still "had it." By allowing it to exist on its own merits, with neither support nor condemnation, EPE and the record company have shown a level of trust in the audience to draw their own conclusions and that's significant.

#10 - Honorable mention: Elvis at Stax. Recontextualizing Elvis's Stax recordings as a fun, funky release was, if not a wide success commercially, an incredibly important one for the fandom. It's no secret the original releases were haphazardly put together and Elvis at Stax is far more cohesive and entertaining.



4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
The Legacy Editions have been solid, providing good quality product at a reasonable price - often giving casual fans a taste of what FTD is like without the premium required to get into FTD. The box sets have been outstanding, albeit difficult to find if you're not specifically looking for it, particularly Young Man with the Big Beat, Elvis at Stax, Prince from Another Planet, and the RCA Albums Collection. Compilation-wise, a lot of the compilations out there are catalogue discs, things like Heart and Soul, Elvis 56, the Playlist series, the Uncovered volumes, and of course the annual Christmas releases. These are good, affordable releases. I hate to say it, but there is some validity in the old company line that a good chunk of Elvis's demographic is middle-aged women from the south or midwest who won't pay more than $5-10 for an Elvis CD, and these are appealing compilations for that demographic, with a good mix of hits, recognizable cover songs and occasionally an obscure tune. I don't see anything wrong with the approach they've taken, clearly it works for them and sales of these surely help offset the costs associated with more collector-friendly releases. The only thing I would take issue with is a need to better market special releases like If I Can Dream or The Wonder of You on a retail level to distinguish them from mere compilations.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
I pick and choose based on where my interests lie. I have no normal FTD purchasing habits. There is just certain material that appeals to me and I will pick those up, and the rest I don't.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
Overall, FTD has been great for the fan community from 1999-present. There are many types of Elvis fans with a variety of interests in different portions of his career. There are concert collectors and there are movie soundtrack buffs and there are classic album lovers. All are equally valid and FTD has done a good job appealing to all of them. Where I fault FTD is not appearing to have any desire to cater to the next generation of fans. I understand that it's Ernst's baby and the product is intended to appeal to people like him - fans who like physical product, with liner notes, photos, and detailed session/concert information. Unfortunately, even within the Elvis world, that type of mentality is shifting. When I was a young fan, I could not afford FTDs (and still have a tough time justifying it) so I would turn to streaming bootlegs in low-quality RealAudio on a number of Elvis fansites to explore Elvis's outtakes, alternates and rare recordings. I see there's a question coming up about this more so I'll elaborate more but I think there should be plans in place to consider, if not digital streaming, then at least premium digital purchases of FTD content to keep the music alive among the next generation of fans who are far more tech savvy.


7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

No, because here's the thing: they would be released somehow anyway, either as a bootleg product or leaked online. It's inevitable. It's far better to let something stand on its own, even if it's rough to listen to or experience, and get PAID for having it out there, then to have it out there illigimately and not gain anything from it in any way.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
Having FTD/outtake content accessible for streaming online only strengthens Elvis' legacy. People are inherently social creatures and like to share what they find interesting. If not on YouTube, then peer to peer torrents. If not torrents, then burned CDs. If not burned CDs, copied cassettes. If not all of those, physically shipping hard drives and flash drives and SD cards to each other. I mean this goes back decades and will continue from here on out. It's human nature. That there's this hesitancy to embrace sharing culture is not surprising for corporations like Sony/EPE but something will have to change in the dynamic between company and individual if there is to be a continued interest in Elvis's deeper catalogue of recorded content throughout the next 4 decades in the way there was in the last 4.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?
As I stated before, the rewards outweigh the risks. The original music is not being replaced on the marketplace, only supplemented with additional releases. One might argue that new mixes and digitally restored/cleaned up audio is as much, if not more so, a "replacement" of the original music as the remixes & rearrangements since digital masters literally have replaced, in the retail environment, the vinyl medium on which the recordings originally appeared. That there have been valid successes like ALLC and the RPO albums is a testament to the power of Elvis's vocal performances and the quality of the songs themselves more than the gimmick used to present them. As long as the "original" content is available and easily or equally accessible, I say let them take risks and let those rise or fall on their own merits, just as the original music did in its day. A song like ALLC did not resonate in 1968 but did in 2002, to the point that the original 1968 master is now revered, included in hits compilations like The Essential Elvis Presley and in video games like Mafia III. Perhaps there are other catalogue songs that are waiting to be rediscovered by the general public in the same manner.

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

Nah, I think I've covered everything.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:59 pm

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
I was pretty young at the time of Elvis' death but I do recall my first exposure to some of the Import LP's available at that time. Past the few albums that I owned at that time, Elvis was very much an unknown to me. I did feel that I wanted to know more about him and his music. I recall receiving Legendary Performer Volume 3 and As Recorded at Madison Square Garden the following Christmas in '78. The Legendary Performer series is what set me off to pursue more releases with outtakes. The best I came across in the early 80's was the Rare Elvis 3 volume LP's by RCA... I believe these were German Imports. Past that, RCA had little else to offer in terms of outtakes at the time. My expectations were more optimistic at the prospect of unreleased material becoming available at the bootleg level rather than with RCA. (at that time anyway)

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
I'm somewhat with midnightx on this... It's difficult to trace any specific point in time when Elvis' catalog was organized or coherent in terms of product availability. I would say that a step in the right direction came when they started to re-release his LP's on CD using the 2007 Anesini remasters... I believe that started in 2008. I own a number of those but it seems as though they didn't follow through on completing that project as some LP's were still unavailable and/or not part of the "remastered" series. That's what I mean... it seems the catalog is done in piece-meal. Some LP's done one way... then others part of a different series. I guess if you were a new fan and wanted exposure to Elvis (at the mainstream level) currently your most direct approach is the 60CD album collection... if you're willing to make the steep investment.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level?
In no particular order:
I'm A Roustabout - once lost acetate, excellent recording by Elvis
Young Man With The Big Beat - complete 1956 studio recordings in remastered sound, includes previously unreleased Louisiana Hayride concert from December 1956
A Boy From Tupelo - limited edition - complete SUN studio recordings with tracks fully restored, includes live tracks from '54-'55 and a beautifully researched and documented hard cover book
A Little Less Conversation (Remix) - Elvis's first #1 recording since 1969 certainly brought Elvis' legacy back into the limelight with positive exposure to new fans
1961 Hawaii Benefit show on the 8LP set Elvis Aron Presley - Elvis' complete live performance from March 25, 1961 USS Arizona Memorial benefit show (previously unreleased)
Elvis Rocks Little Rock (Import CD 1989) - first release of a 1956 live show
The complete June 1968 stand up and sit down shows
Essential Elvis, 6 volume series


4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
I do like several of the Legacy Edition series but even that seems to have fallen off the tracks with the latest "Elvis Today" release including a compilation mono soundboard concert from May-June 1975. However, a few standouts for me would include Prince From Another Planet with both concerts entire remixed (which included a DVD of concert footage!!), the Elvis at Stax set was very well done and Way Down In The Jungle Room set.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
I pick and choose. I'm interested in the Classic Series as well as some of the soundboards depending on what they are. I absolutely love how they handled the American Studio sessions and I own those 3 volumes. I probably have about 90-100 FTD's currently in my collection.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
The reality of it is, FTD has been a god-send. While the releases come at a premium price, I do understand why that is. As fans we really don't know just how lucky we have been having Ernst run Elvis' catalog and by giving us this collector label. I don't feel there have been too many releases but I do think some areas have been given too much focus (like the June '75 and 1976 soundboards). I don't think there have been missed opportunities at the collector label level... there is still material available to be released and there doesn't have to be a schedule. There are some releases I wouldn't want exposed at a mainstream level so I'm happy with how I currently go about ordering FTD's.

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.
My Way (1971 studio recording) - horrible performance and something I'm positive Elvis would not have wanted to leave the shelf
1974 Vegas rehearsal mono recordings - Elvis is in a bad way at this point and we see no evidence of his creative side... he's unmotivated and bored and you can hear it in these recordings
New Haven concert... I don't think I need to say any more


8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
Elvis legacy won't be adversely affected by what a small percentage of people are seeing on youtube. Outside of Elvis' fan base, I can't imagine there are too many people searching youtube for Elvis. If you're a collector, you want the real thing... I might be guilty of downloading an official release but it's because I want to hear the product before I buy it. If I like it, I'll buy it but if I don't, I'm not going to keep the download and continue to listen it... as a collector there's no point.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?
I like the fact that A Little Less Conversation went to number #1... it was very well done and was a good thing for Elvis... it got people talking about him again. However, I'm not a fan of manipulating his original recordings... and most of what is on the 2 volumes of the RPO releases is dreadful. I don't believe it's what Elvis would have wanted.

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.
Bring on the multi-track audio of the three Elvis On Tour concert performances that are currently unavailable as well as the TTWII rehearsals!!!
Last edited by elvis-fan on Thu Dec 01, 2016 3:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Wed Nov 23, 2016 4:29 am

Answers below.

poormadpeter2 wrote:At the University of Kent next year, there is an academic conference about how Elvis has continued to be successful since his death both from the point of view of his music (the releasing of unheard performances etc) and as a commodity (Graceland, exhibitions, egg cups - whatever). I have put forward to do a paper, but won't know until the new year whether or not it is accepted. However, it will probably get written either way.

I would like, if possible, to get input from yourselves as well via the ten-question survey below. I'm posting this now rather than later as it seems to be a time when people are talking about the good, bad and the ugly of posthumous release on the board anyway, from the discussion of the West Texas FTD, through to the recent threads on Collector's Gold, and also, of course, the RPO albums.

So, if you have time, and can answer the following ten questions, I would be very thankful. I have tried not to make them leading in any way.

You are welcome to post your answers here, or within a private message to me if you prefer your views to not be known amongst other members. Answers given will be used anonymously in any paper or article.

Please note that all questions are about OFFICIAL releases and not bootlegs.

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

Being only 15 at the time, this thought did not cross my mind at all.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?

That did not happen until Ernst came along. He was a is a godsend as far as the Elvis catalogue is concerned.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

I think the 3 most important release were the The Complete 50's Masters, The Essential 60's Masters and the Essential 70's Masters boxsets. At the time of their release between 1992 and 1995 they were the mother load, and IMO are to this day a solid piece of the Elvis legacy.

4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc

My main issue is that as time goes on, there really is no retail level so to speak, with the exception of Amazon to get new Elvis product. Buying something at your local shop or department store is getting harder with each passing year.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

I buy all FTD CD's and all of the LP's (except the latest one). As far as the books go, I pick and choose which ones now, but in the beginning I got them all.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

The FTD label has been by far the best thing that could have happened for the fans. I was a supporter from the beginning and I am still one today. The music is the main thing, and I don't feel there have been too many at all.

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

Each release has been a piece of the Elvis puzzle. Some I love, some I like and some not so much, but they are part of Elvis' musical output and as fans we are fortunate that we have such regular high quality releases. Fans of other artists would die to have what we have.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

I don't feel that this is an issue at all. If it brings the music to a wider, younger audience, then that's a good thing.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

At first with the Guitar Man album and the A Little Less Conversation single, I thought that these were fine. As time has passed, I am less enthused with such releases. The RPO albums are not my cup of tea at all. Though I do like the Bossa Nova remix ;-)

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

Ernst and Roger are owed the gratitude of the fans for the incredible job they have done with FTD and the main label since they came on board! One thing I'd like to see next year is an On Tour box set of all rehearsals done and all live shows recorded in association with the film.

Thank you for your time.

I should add that, beyond thanking people, I won't be getting involved in discussions about answers given on here.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:43 pm

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

I hoped there would be solid concert material and unreleased gems but I was afraid there'd be jumbled releases like I'd seen with some other deceased artists.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?

The late 90's were a great time for me personally. I was thrilled to get some of the 70's catalog that I'd missed on vinyl. The new compilations released during that period have seldom been topped in my opinion.


3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

EAP, Golden Celebration, Collector's Gold, 50's, 60's, 70's sets, Essentials series. There are more recent releases that are just as important but these broke new ground in my opinion.


4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc

I've been pleased with the Legacy releases overall. The Stax box set was impressive. Most of the box sets have been well done.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

I bought the first few releases but soon got behind and couldn't afford to catch up. I'd love to have them all but it's just not feasible at this time. I hope to get some before they are deleted.


6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

I understand the mindset/business model in regard to this series but the prices are somewhat high in my opinion. The amount released at one time make it hard to keep up. I'm not saying the circumstances are the same but the Jimi Hendrix estate offers similar product for a lot less money. It just sometimes seems that Elvis fans are always subjected to higher prices than others. Compare prices of catalog sets by other artists.
I'd love to see the FTDs stay in print and possibly be re-released in a more economical way.
I think some of them would do well as mainstream releases. Even box sets with certain types grouped together would be a way to add value.


7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

None that come to mind. Can't speak in regard to the bulk of FTD releases.


8.)The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

I'll admit that I've listened to some FTDs on YT. I haven't downloaded them and don't intend to in the future but I will keep checking out some of them along the way. I don't know what the impact will be long-term beyond financial concerns for the label.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

I'm usually hesitant about these releases but have enjoyed some more than I expected.
The RPOs are the best by far of the type in my opinion.



10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

I think the better regarded releases should be kept in print longer instead of the constant rehashes.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Sat Nov 26, 2016 1:55 am

Good luck with your survey. All of you members that has participated...good work.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Sun Nov 27, 2016 2:43 am

Interesting post, good luck wih it.

1. In 1977 I was 10. I thought a singer sang the song once then everyone went home!

2. The early - mid '90's. The early box sets, the first two sets especially, were a revelation tovme despite my having listened to this material for mosty of my life, they represent(ed) the high point I think. The Essential series was fantastic, releases like 'An Afternoon St The Garden' (loved the Ferrante mix) and the Double features series were a difficult job well done. Mastered from the analogue tapes, the early '90's CD issues of the the '70's albums were debatably better than the loud, compressed and clipped sound that what we often get today. They were good times to be an Elvis fan.

3. The '50's, '60'sand '70's box sets. The ALLC remix and 30 #1 got a new generation into Elvis (my daughters generation). And probably, looked at retrospectively, the RPO albums will be considered another milestone (even though I personally hate them).

4. Messy. The Legacy issues have helped, occassionally brilliant in fact, but there is still way too much product out there which only has the effect of diluting the music, intrinsic and historic value and quality of the music itself. There is way too much duplication and still too much Colonel Parker mentality. It's a shame: EJ and RS did a brilliant job of tidying things up in the '90's and now things seem to be going AWAOL again.

I also think there is not enough by way of creative compilations. Contradicting myself here abit I know, but I think - an example - a well thought out album of the best of the first takes, thrown in with the odd oddity like the laughing 'lonesome' '69 version) would do well with the mainstream market, if pushed properly. I compiled such a CD for my 25 year old daughter and I know she has copied it to friends of her own age at least 4 or 5 times and it has been very popular.

5. I used to buy all the FTD's until a couple of years ago. Space issues, and chasing completeness for nearly 40 years has taken it's toll on my patience and cost me alot of hair (not to mention money) so today I pick and choose. That I do not buy them all today is not a reflection on their quality - I have the awful feeling that despite my rhetoric, the last space created by the last reoriganisation will be reorgasnised again and space will be made, insanity will set in further and I will catch up with those I have skipped.

6. As a whole, brilliant. I think FTD have dropped a few clangers along the way - the "Stage Rehearsal" CD and issuing soundboards at the wrong speed and pitch are where they go wrong being examples - sloppy, details, basically. But I cannot complain - I would almost consider it rude to do so.

7. Nothing - that we know is in RCA's possession - comes to mind. A '69 rehearsal, the '56 gig with 'Only You' on it, Golden Gate, the 'Hound Dog' session, 'Tiger Man' acetate (without meaning to restart that debate) or Pittsburgh soundboard would be nice, but I am not aware that RCA have these and though EJ may be good even he can't release things he doesn't have - which is a great pity!

8. You tube: depends how you see it. As an enthusiast, it's indispensable. As an artist, it must be infuriating. But like remixes, it's bad for the music but great for the market. Downloads the same.

9. Principally I am against remixes. But they attract new fans and that can only be a good thing.

10. Yes. Give us a decent release on EOT.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Nov 28, 2016 1:40 am

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

I was way too young in 1977, but don't think anybody expected a lot of unreleased material to come out.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?

From around 1992 to 1998, when Ernst worked on the great 50's 60's and 70's box sets (only the latter was a bit of a disappointment because 1) the way the tracks were ordered and 2) the fact that too many tracks were not included. But except for that fact, it was at then that Ernst put the Elvis catalogue in perspective.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

To me: the decade boxes, DF-series, "Amazing Grace", the Christmas compilation from the 90's and the 1968-releases from around 1998. Those releases not only documented Elvis' work very well for the first time, they also added nice little extra's and also put the recordings in perspective.

4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc

It feels like we returned to the late eighties. Some great releases, some not-so-great. Looking in local stores I see a lot of "public domain" releases, and then specialized releases like the Stax or TTWII box sets (which I thought were great) just don't do it for the general public. I don't know anyone of my (non Elvis fan) friends that ever bought a Legacy edition. I think we should have a nice set of about 10 single disc releases: some greatest hits, some themed compilations and a few live releases.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

I normally buy all of them, except for the 12" releases. To be honest I am getting some "book fatigue syndrome" and "complete soundboard fatigue". I wish FTD would document every tour, not necessarily by releasing complete concerts with very very very similar content. I liked the concept of the Live In Las Vegas box set from 10-15 years ago: a comprehensive overview, without much duplication. I don't need to have every sound Elvis ever made on CD. The Classic Albums were great however, and I hope the missing albums are released soon.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

Sometimes it feels like there are so many releases we cannot "know" them any more. But since no-one forces me to buy them that is probably not a valid complaint.
Also I feel FTD should have released a lot more of On Tour material. There is a wealth of material available, and a multi-CD mini-series (like the American or Stax-based Classic albums) could finally do this period of Elvis' career justice.
I don't feel that The Tupelo and Hawaii live shows should have been "add ons" to another release, because the material is so historically important. I understand why that choice was made, but it "feels" wrong to me.
Other missed opportunities: yes: a website where each release got 1 page with extra information and a youtube promo with some fragments. School kids make these now within minutes, why doesn't FTD use this marketing channel?


7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

Probably, but there's no use in crying over spilled milk. Most of the things I have in mind shouldn't have been recorded... Nobody was waiting on the Old MacDonalds, Ito Eats, or Yoga Is As Yoga Does songs (to name only a few) .... But since they were recorded, they are part of the legacy. I also think Elvis shouldn't have done 1000+ concerts, but he did. At some point quality did suffer from it. They shouldn't have happened, but since they did... I think it is not that important whether or not some things are released. I find it very important that the record company (be it mainstream or FTD) puts every release in perspective. I know Elvis was not at his best in 1977 for the Elvis in Concert, I think he shouldn't have been on stage in that condition, but they released a double album and showed it on television. If or when they do release a classic album version of this, they should put it in perspective. I don't think EIC is worse than half the movie songs Elvis recorded. I don't think the general public is awaiting such release, though.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

I have mixed feelings about this... obviously, this material should only be posted legally on youtube by RCA (or whomever might own it now) (and I wish they would announce new releases on Facebook and/or Youtube). On the other hand, since these companies don't put fighting these practices very high on their priority list, because they probably think the same as I do: impact is minimal. If RCA/Sony/FTD/... would put it online themselves, they could point out that it is a collector's release or that it was a live concert when Elvis was down, depressed or whatever..

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

I'm no big fan of non-typical overdubs, like ALLC, Rubberneckin', .... I find some of the RPO overdubs refreshing and others are "acceptable" at best.
I hated the 1983 "I Was The One" overdubs, but I do feel like the Felton Jarvis overdubs were nice, even though a lot of fans didn't like them. I like them because they sounded like the contemporary versions Elvis could have recorded in 1980. I wouldn't mind a new "contemporary Elvis" style release.


10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

Even though were a lot of "mistakes", I still like the fact that in the periode between 1977 and 1984, at least they tried to find new ways to cope with the fact that Elvis was dead. They searched and released stereo mixes of songs previously only available in mono, released alternates and even private recordings. I don't think all releases should have happened, but there wasn't really a guidebook too follow. It was hit and miss, but they tried.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Thu Dec 01, 2016 1:34 am

poormadpeter2 wrote:At the University of Kent next year, there is an academic conference about how Elvis has continued to be successful since his death both from the point of view of his music (the releasing of unheard performances etc) and as a commodity (Graceland, exhibitions, egg cups - whatever). I have put forward to do a paper, but won't know until the new year whether or not it is accepted. However, it will probably get written either way.

I would like, if possible, to get input from yourselves as well via the ten-question survey below. I'm posting this now rather than later as it seems to be a time when people are talking about the good, bad and the ugly of posthumous release on the board anyway, from the discussion of the West Texas FTD, through to the recent threads on Collector's Gold, and also, of course, the RPO albums.

So, if you have time, and can answer the following ten questions, I would be very thankful. I have tried not to make them leading in any way.

You are welcome to post your answers here, or within a private message to me if you prefer your views to not be known amongst other members. Answers given will be used anonymously in any paper or article.

Please note that all questions are about OFFICIAL releases and not bootlegs.

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
I was only 7 when he died but had the Legendary Performer Vol.1 album and Moody Blue. Since it had live songs on it I just assumed that more concert stuff was recorded. A few years later I was introduced to the world of bootlegs and realized that RCA must have a lot more stuff. Since I was a fan of concerts my hope was that more of that would get released.
2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
I would say the early 90's when the decade box sets were being released. We also had stuff like Collector's Gold so there seemed to be a coherent attempt to organize the catalog into some semblance of order.
3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.
As far as most important releases since Elvis died, My Happiness is the biggest thing. I don't honestly think ANYONE saw that coming and I remember a whole lot of comments like, "Wouldn't it be something if someone found that?" The MS/AL Fair shows were incredible and all the home recorded stuff was great. The decade box sets were great too.
4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
I personally like what they are doing for the most part. Especially the Legacy editions. Offering the original albums with outtakes is fantastic.
5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
I rarely buy FTD titles because it isn't my cup of tea. I do have A Boy From Tupelo and a couple of other titles but that's it.
6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
I think overall FTD is great for the hardcore Elvis collector. I'm not (Dylan guy obviously) but I can appreciate what they are doing. There have been far too many 1976 concerts for example. Yes, there have been missed opportunities such as TTWII and EOT but since the label isn't dead we may yet see them. I'm not sure what else they can do. They are proof positive that you can't please all the people all the time. As far as being from only certain outlets, most people wouldn't know FTD from RCA from Sony so I think they could be put in chain stores. The downside is that the average fan might see the price and not understand what it is.
7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.
No. I think everything they have released has been in good taste and well presented.
8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
The pro- the possibility of getting new Elvis fans. The con- Elvis is getting ripped off. Again.
9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?
Hate, hate, hate them.
10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.
Nothing to add.
Thank you for your time.

I should add that, beyond thanking people, I won't be getting involved in discussions about answers given on here.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Wed Dec 07, 2016 5:09 am

1) Can’t answer, wasn’t around at the time

2) Don’t have anything to share on this one, I’ve been satisfied for as long as I’ve been a fan.

3a) Elvis 1 – This collection did very well, and the dance-mix done on “Little Less Conversation” took off in a way that I don’t think was anticipated at the time. This release did so well that of course they followed it with “2nd to None”, which was also well thought out at the time.

3b) The BMG 50s, 60s, and 70s boxsets were also highly important because of the work that was done in the liner notes, and the sheer volume of material that was made available in a single purchase. These boxsets were what got me started on Elvis.

4) It’s a tough market to sell any kind of music in, much less for an artist that’s been gone for almost 40 years. That said, I think the Elvis team has done a great job keeping things interesting and fresh. It’s tempting to complain that there is too much product, but one must remember that each new product potentially brings new fans to the table. It’s frustrating to me that so much of the current product line is only available online, but I suppose that’s the way it goes.

5) I’ve been slowly accumulating the studio albums first. “From Elvis Presley Blvd” was a new FTD release when I got started collecting. I have a few essential live releases (Vegas 1969, Boston 1971), but have been focusing on studio albums first (Working my way backwards from the 70s to the 50s.) No books (couldn’t be less interested.) I have no intention of ever owning “everything.” The soundboards and audience recordings are only going to pique my interest if the sound quality is passable. I was very disappointed with the sound on “The On Stage Season” and as a result very seldom even bother listening to it. That purchase taught me a lesson.

6) I wish they were a little less expensive, particularly the single CD releases. To shell out $30 plus tax and shipping for 80 minutes of material tests my dedication as a fan. I wish they would get it together with the “Elvis on Tour” material. I wish they would have some sort of online store where individual MP3s could be purchased. Their recent endless 1976 soundboard releases are a little frustrating, but I know that there simply isn’t that much left from 1970-1974 to be released that is of any good sound quality. I also find their decision to hold back on releasing more from 1969 and 1977 to be puzzling. Others (bootlegs) have sold well from both periods. The refusal to release Hawaii 1961 as a single CD (not tied to a book) is also a puzzler to me.

7) No, the more the better

8) No comment to give, no opinion.

9) If done right (Viva Elvis) it can be magnificent. If done poorly (Guitar Man), the results are a disaster. In the end, these efforts inevitably lead new people to look into the originals, which brings new fans. I’m OK with these releases.

10) Still waiting for Elvis on Tour, 8/31/69, and anything else that might be coming!

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Fri Dec 09, 2016 12:15 am

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

I can’t really remember what my expectations were, I figured it was OVER. I was most upset that I had tickets to see him and that there would be no more concerts. I’ve been vocal about this before but I really took it personal when RCA released SINGS FOR CHILDREN AND GROWN UPS TOO. I was insulted by that release. This was all that they could come up with? HE WALKS BESIDE ME was good!! Even MAHALO FROM ELVIS filled a void. LEGENDARY PERFORMER 3 was great! Even OUR MEMORIES OF ELVIS Vol.1 & 2 were refreshing. The SILVER and GOLD Box sets were very exciting. THIS IS ELVIS was just what we needed, but then GREATEST HITS Vol. 1 comes out (with a couple of nice unreleased tracks). But at the time, I was pissed (and continue to today) of simply rehashing the same songs over and over and over. BUT, put ONE unreleased song on there so the diehards would have to buy it (standard marketing however). Even though I complained, I still bought everything. I guess I was hoping for more concerts to be released. I spent the 80’s collecting/trading Elvis concert cassettes, but using my expendable income for Springsteen Bootlegs. I stopped all fan clubs and corresponding with Elvis fans. There was nothing that blew me away until Ernst Jorgensen came on the scene. And THEN, as an adult, it was great fun RE-listening to EVERYTHING ELVIS again and I was able to hear, appreciate and rediscover him even more. Once the internet came along I check into the Elvis World DAILY. I guess my expectations were really LOW, the 80’s releases have their merits, but I guess I was just sad, looking back now, maybe in mourning. At 14 I really wasn’t thinking of outtakes or rehearsals, plus I already had some via the bootlegs, so again I wasn’t hoping for RCA to release anything I already had. I should have bought SINGS FOR KIDS simply for the free photo from Nassau ’73.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organized, coherent and accessible? Why?

I don’t really think in terms of “periods”. There was either BEFORE or AFTER he passed away. I guess I think in terms of decades. To answer the question I’m thinking late 90’s was a good period.

Posthumously my favorite retail releases are from A Hundred Years from Now (1996) to It’s Christmas Time (1999).


3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

The reason FTDs are not “important enough” for retail is simply based on the dollar bill. It’s not that they aren’t important, but FTD is for the fans (and they are a MUST for fans), in limited editions. Anything at the retail level is for the general public, thus scrutiny from the press, chart success (or not) and sales figures which have extra elements that add to or take away its perceived value. As a fan, I want all 30 takes of GOING HOME that FTD provides. A house wife shopping at Walmart, picking up a birthday present for a loved one is only looking for the hits.
My 10:
Elvis Aron Presley (Silver Box)
--The first box set, wow, a very important archival release.
A Golden Celebration (Gold Box)
--Ok now in 1984, we get a sense that there is more that needs released.
Platinum: A life in Music
--If you can only get ONE, this is my go-to gift for friends who are interested in the next level after the hits.
Essential ‘50s ‘60’s, ‘70’s masters
--Title says it all. I cheated here and listed the 3 box sets as ONE.
Collector’s Gold
--This one was important to me, there were things on this release that I simply enjoy hearing back to back, and there were a few NEW items (to me). A very enjoyable listen.
Afternoon at the Garden
--Another go-to present, if I could only pick ONE concert to share. Why-O-Why the evening show was the preferred release I’ll never know. I bought this, played it in my car on the way home from NATIONAL RECORD MART, I had to pulled over and cry at the joy and sentiment of this release.
Amazing Grace: His Greatest Sacred Performances
--This and the Christmas releases cannot be over looked.
Tiger Man
--Anything from the ’68 special (which was ground zero for me). Friends I know who don’t even collect Elvis, love this stuff.
Tucson '76 (FTD)
--A guilty pleasure. You know when you go fishing one morning and the fish just aren’t biting. You decide to leave by noon, but you get a nibble around 11:30. That nibble will give you hope to stay out at least until 2:30. DANNY BOY on this CD isn’t the best version, but it gives us a glimpse into what Elvis was thinking and his mood that day, and hope that in the vast archives that we’ve not heard, maybe there is a MARY IN THE MORNING or some other (nibble)of a rare song that wasn’t just a one liner or a toss off.
CLASSIC ALBUM SERIES (FTD) (any and all)
--These are the legacy of FTD. They are like NPR fly-on-the-wall documentaries, simply a joy to listen too.


4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc

There is a long way between how things were done when Elvis was alive compare to how things are released today. I would be willing to pay a monthly streaming fee to be able to listen to EVERY single outtake AND concert in the RCA archives at my leisure. But at the retail level?…how many more times can HOUND DOG be released. I’m ok with them releasing anything and everything. I don’t really care if it’s RCA, FTD, Touchdown Productions or Straight Arrow. I like them all, or at least like the option to buy them if I need them. Lately I find that I buy less of the retail stuff and look forward to the next FTDs. From a broad retail standpoint, get rid of the Elvis Ducks and Elvis Shot Glasses and lamp shades.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

I can’t afford ALL of them, but I’ve got ALL of them from the period between 1968 to 1977. Then I pick up some CLASSIC ALBUM SERIES and other favorites not from my era.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

I like everything about FTD. I love the ’76 shows, but there does seem to be a lot and I can see why some are unhappy about that. He toured the MOST in 1976, so obviously that’s the year they have the most material from. FTDs are a bit expensive but usually there are 2 CDs and a booklet for added value. I enjoyed the compilations like I SING ALL KINDS, but I’d rather have the CLASSIC ALBUM SERIES and have all the outtakes within context.

The only missed opportunity (that comes to mind) was the resent release of HOMETOWN SHOWS, why not include the 1976 show also (there’s those pesky ’76 shows again – ha).

I like that you can only get FTDs from certain outlets, it's like being part of a club that only a few cool cats are allowed in.


7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

The short answer is “no”. I do scratch my head on New Haven ’76. I’m glad I got it. When you are collecting – to much is never enough. But of the tours and Vegas season still needing represented with a product, I would have put New Haven ’76 farther down on the list (but I would still have wanted it released at some point).

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

I think it will have a strong and lasting effect on Elvis’ legacy. It allows those interested in Elvis (but not a hardcore collector) a chance to check him out.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

I love A LITTLE LESS CONVERSATION and RUBBERNECKIN. I don’t care for the new string arrangements and here’s why: Fetlon Jarvis added strings in Elvis’ lifetime. So having John Williams or any other philharmonic orchestra add their 2 cents worth, is just that – adding their opinion or “version” in these cases. But we already know what Elvis approved. So every 10 years updating the old songs with new music is just the interpretation of that conductor’s vision at the moment. They aren’t really adding anything new to what we have…just different.

A LITTLE SEES CONVERSATION (and others of those types) are something completely new. I don’t think Elvis would have liked it. But in the spirit of the Sun Sessions, where Sam Phillips says, (paraphrasing) “if you ain’t doing something new, then you ain’t doing nothin’”. Those remixes are very exciting. But simply adding different strings to a song we already have strings on is redundant to me. When in doubt, always go back to the source. Elvis’ original versions are still the best.


10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.
I’m glad I was wrong. I thought ELVIS IN CONCERT would be the last. Collecting Elvis now is almost as exciting as collecting in the 1970’s when he was alive.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Mon Dec 19, 2016 12:08 am

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
I was too young!

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
It has never been very well organised full stop. That is partly a result of the legacy of the total catalogue mess during his lifetime (thanks to the Colonel) and the sheer amount of material released compared to most other artists.
I give credit to Ernst and BMG in attempting to bring greater order to things, but I still think that for casual and new fans the sheer mass of product is totally overwhelming and prevents people from accessing many gems.


3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.
Objectively, in terms of commercial & critical importance, and the repositioning of Elvis the artist, I would say the 50s, 60s, 70s box sets, plus 30 #1 Hits.
Songs: My Happiness for historical importance, A little less conversation (JXL) for commercial importance.
For me personally, Stereo ’57 Essential Elvis vol.2 was mind-blowing to hear the 50’s King in a clarity I had never expected.
And what FTD/MRS do in fully documenting a key moment in time (eg. Tupelo ’56 or Hawaii ’61) is also wonderful.


4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
It is better than it has been at times in the past, but it is still overwhelming and confusing to the casual fan.
In my opinion what should be offered in retail is the original albums, plus a few select compilations that make biographical sense (eg. Gospel, ones covering a specific year/period) and everything else should be on FTD.


5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
I buy the releases relating to my favourite original albums or years only. I have not been converted by FTD onto any stuff that I didn’t originally like anyway, eg. I have no interest at all in soundboards.
But the FTD versions of my favourite albums have replaced the originals and I often listen to the outtakes more often than the masters, they have greatly enhanced my love of the original albums!


6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
Elvis fans are very lucky to have FTD, taken as a whole it is an absolute blessing and no other artist’s fans have anything as good.
I see the role of FTD as ultimately releasing everything that exists, but keeping it separate from the retail catalogue.
I fully understand the limiting to certain outlets and the premium pricing in order to make it inaccessible to casual fans who might not know what they are buying. Having said that, I would probably buy more FTDs (esp. books) if the price wasn’t so high.


7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.
No – there are many releases I personally have no interest in whatsoever, however some fans will want them so good luck to them.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
YouTube and other sites are uncontrollable, the same issue affects all other artists so focus only on what can actually be controlled, which is the official catalogue.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?
I never buy them but I understand their value in keeping Elvis fresh, in the shops and on the radio. You can’t argue with success like the RPO.
For those who say Elvis would be turning in his grave – no artist was exploited worse and more cheaply during his lifetime than Elvis (thanks to Col. P), if anything these new releases are more classy than some of the rubbish released in the 60s/70s (eg. The “Having fun on stage” LP).


10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.
Elvis has only one equal in music history – the Beatles.
The management of the Beatles catalogue is exemplary, and often it seems EPE and RCA just blindly copy what has been done for them. The #1s and the Cirque de soleil albums were simply copied from the Beatles a year or two later, yet nothing as good as the Anthology has been done on Elvis.
I wish that Elvis would be handled just as respectfully and professionally. I think it’s safe to say 40 years on, that there will never be another performer like him.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Thu Dec 22, 2016 6:15 am

Hi PMP,
sorry for delayed reply

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?
No expectations.
In those "punk" days I thought Elvis had really done nothing of substance in years.
The "Sun Sessions" in 1976 being his best release in years.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?
From 1989, the "Essential Elvis" series and then first 50's box-set was the turning point.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.
50s, 60s & 70s box-set plus 'Command Performances' Movies compile.
Essential Elvis Vol 2,3,4,5,6 - GREAT discovery of the wealth of outtakes potentially in the vaults.
Platinum was also an excellent box-set as was the Close-Up follow up.

4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc
One MAJOR release per year is a good idea.
The "Legacy" series is also a fine idea.
The larger STAX and 'Prince From Another Planet' were brilliant releases (bar the blank spaces on the DVD).
The TTWII Deluxe box-set should have had a better 'DVD/Movie' section.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?
I buy every FTD CD.
Sadly I have to pick & choose which FTD book to purchase (purely due to expensive postage > Australia nearly doubling costs)

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?
Hindsight makes complaining all too easy.
MOST FTD releases are a joy to behold - and they do keep coming up with very fine releases.
However the number of poor 1976 shows being issued so close together was terrible planning.
Missing the "Public Domain" deadline for GI Blues Classic discs was also a big mistake.
The audio upgrade on 'Bloch Arena' should have been better (If MRS can do a better audio improvement then it was too rushed).
"Stage Rehearsals" was a real mess - The bootleg version was better.
Prices are "OK" but single discs with no booklet are no longer value-for-money.

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.
Perhaps not so many 1976 releases (especially the very poor concerts - Poor Elvis)
Otherwise just keep 'em coming

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?
Illegal downloads effects every artist.
Yes, it will get harder to make money from Elvis product - but the guy has been dead for nearly 40 years so surely that's OK.
I feel sorrier for the new artists.

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?
MOSTLY they are terrible.
However I felt that the ALLC Remix was very smart, a great (if unplanned) concept, and the kick-in-the-ass that Elvis' legacy REALLY NEEDED back in 2002.
Re-asserting Elvis' creativity through "remixes" can be fine if cleverly done.
Creating Elvis lame KARAOKE via the RPO overdubs will NOT help Elvis' legacy in the long-run.

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.
Just keep 'em coming

Cheers
Piers

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Sun Jan 22, 2017 10:26 pm

Thank you for all the answers. I had confirmation today that the paper will be given in June.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Tue Apr 18, 2017 7:57 pm

Answers inside the quotation:

poormadpeter2 wrote:
Please note that all questions are about OFFICIAL releases and not bootlegs.

1.) If you were around in 1977, do you remember what your expectations were regarding the possibility of unreleased material being issued after Elvis’s death? Did you expect/hope for official releases of outtakes, concerts, rehearsals?

---------

No. Not right away. When "And Grownups too" came out, and was stacked up on the front racks, it was very unpleasant. Hard to believe.

2.) Between 1977 and the present day, during which period do you think the Elvis catalogue at retail level (not FTD) was at its most organised, coherent and accessible? Why?

--------

The Legacy Series, I believe. Why? They have class, and outtakes.

3.) What do you consider to have been the most important releases since Elvis’s death? These can be individual tracks, complete albums, boxed sets etc. If listing albums etc, your choices do NOT necessarily have to include unreleased material, but please state why, for example, a compilation was important in your opinion. You can include FTD releases, but in this case can you suggest why something “important” wasn’t released at retail level? You can list up to ten items.

------------


The blues album. Loved it from the first moment I saw it. It's head and shoulders beyond anything else for many reasons. Beautiful album art, too!

I could list a bunch more. But I decided to choose one.

4.) What is your view of the way the Elvis catalogue is currently presented at retail level (not FTD)? For example, the Legacy editions, recent boxed sets, compilations etc

-----------

Not bad. But not enough outtakes and rarities. Those should be generally available, or at least the best of them.

5.) What is your normal buying practice with regards to FTD? Do you normally buy everything that comes out? Or do you pick and choose? Perhaps you only buy one type of release (classic album series, soundboards, compilations of outtakes, books etc)?

---------

I generally prefer the studio outtakes on FTD. The live stuff that I enjoy is from June 1968 through 1970. I don't collect every live recording, no.

6.) How do view FTD overall? As examples (but you can mention things beyond the following): Do you think there have been too many/too few releases? Or too many/few of one particular type of release? Do you think releases are value for money? Have their been missed opportunities? What do you think about FTD only being available from certain outlets?

------------

They definitely should be available at retail and/or HD Tracks for immediate download.

Yes, they offer more than enough value for the money. They are worth the money, if you've got it. But not so many live shows that are so similar and not so great.

7.) Are there any outtakes/rehearsals/private recordings/concerts that you feel should have NOT been released? If so, why? You can list as many as you wish.

--------

The early Joan Deary stuff should not have been released. Especially the first one, which seems almost insulting considering he recently died.

8.) The use of YouTube and illegal downloads etc means that material released on FTD for the hardcore fandom does not necessarily stay within that domain. For example, many videos containing outtakes appear at (or near) the top of search results on YouTube. How do you think the availability of this type of material might impact the Elvis legacy in years to come? Is that even important?

--------

Some people just don't have the money to buy them. So, I think it's okay to hear them that way. They wouldn't have bought it anyway because they couldn't.

The only kick about it is that bootlegs are presented along with FTD releases. And there are good reasons why FTD won't release certain tracks and outtakes and goof-offs. The main one is his dirty and misunderstood ditty about a hairy rodent sexually assaulting the "man in the moon."

9.) What are you views of albums that manipulate Elvis’s recordings through remixes (such as A Little Less Conversation), new backing tracks (such as the Guitar Man album), overdubbing instruments (such as the RPO albums), and any other examples you can think of?

Most remixes suck. But ALLC was extraordinary because it was an unfinished 1968 insert that was never released to the general public The *first* Philharmonic album is MUCH better than I expected. I still play it a lot.

-----------

10.) Any other comments about posthumous Elvis releases.

--------

I wish they were more like the Dylan "Bootleg Series." On the other hand, we get more pure stuff than we get from Dylan, generally.

-------

Thank you for your time.

----------
You are most welcome.

-------


I should add that, beyond thanking people, I won't be getting involved in discussions about answers given on here.


-------

Cool. Good luck with your paper. I always enjoyed conferences much more than writing for about 10 people to read in a journal.

Best,
rjm

P.S. -- Uh oh. I came late to the party. Perhaps you might want to squeeze something into your paper.
Last edited by rjm on Wed Apr 19, 2017 9:43 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Re: Posthumous Elvis releases survey.

Sun May 28, 2017 11:14 pm

Thank you for all your comments. A variety of comments from your responses will be used in the paper on Saturday - all will be given anonymously.