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Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Tue Jun 22, 2010 9:06 pm

Hello,

In the 2008 book "'68 At 40" written by Steve Binder and published by J.A.T. Productions, there is a reproduction of some of Steve's personal notes regarding the workings of the television special. In particular there is mentioned on one page of the book the notation about Charlie (I'm assuming Charlie Hodge) brought in a record with the song title "Truckstop Romance (Not Me)." besides that title is the names (Tepper, Bennett). One would assume that this song was written by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett. However, upon further research, this is not the case. In fact, "Truckstop Romance" and "Not Me" are 2 different songs. They were recorded on the same single for United Artists (UA 517) in 1962 by Billy Edd (Wheeler). "Truckstop Romance" was written by Billy Edd Wheeler and "Not Me" was written by Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller, and Billy Edd Wheeler. The single for United Artists was produced by Leiber / Stoller. Any serious Elvis fan would be familiar with the work of Leiber and Stoller, and of course Billy Edd Wheeler wrote "It's Midnight" and "Never Again" which Elvis recorded. He also co-wrote with Leiber the Johnny Cash/June Carter duet "Jackson", as well as co-writing "Coward Of The County" and writing "Ann." One would think that "Truckstop Romance" was a song in consideration for the Road Medley portion of the 1968 Comeback Special, possibly taken the place by "Let Yourself Go." It would seem that besides "Saved" (written by Leiber / Stoller), that they submitted additional material for the '68 Special.

Daryl

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Tue Jun 22, 2010 9:22 pm

interesting post

thanks Daryl

I would also guess that these songs were considered for the show but ultimately not used.
I'm sure lots of songs were probably considered.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Tue Jun 22, 2010 11:27 pm

Daryl wrote:"Truckstop Romance" was written by Billy Edd Wheeler and "Not Me" was written by Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller, and Billy Edd Wheeler. The single for United Artists was produced by Leiber / Stoller ... One would think that "Truckstop Romance" was a song in consideration for the Road Medley portion of the 1968 Comeback Special, possibly taken the place by "Let Yourself Go." It would seem that besides "Saved" (written by Leiber / Stoller), that they submitted additional material for the '68 Special.

Interesting research!

Although it's doubtful Leiber and Stoller personally submitted anything for the 1968 TV Special -- FECC member PStoller might be able to shed light on that -- it is interesting the songs made a shortlist.

"Not Me," Jerry and Mike's song, was the A-side in Dec 1962, the artist credited as "Billy Edd":


Image

Billboard - Dec 1, 1962


Billy Edd was very grateful for the support of Leiber and Stoller, and was asked to write some notes for a UK compilation:


Image

The Leiber and Stoller Story, Volume 3 (Ace, 2007)


I'm unsure if they got in, but here's a segment of Wheeler's prose:

Image

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 23, 2010 12:12 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:
Daryl wrote:"Truckstop Romance" was written by Billy Edd Wheeler and "Not Me" was written by Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller, and Billy Edd Wheeler. The single for United Artists was produced by Leiber / Stoller ... One would think that "Truckstop Romance" was a song in consideration for the Road Medley portion of the 1968 Comeback Special, possibly taken the place by "Let Yourself Go." It would seem that besides "Saved" (written by Leiber / Stoller), that they submitted additional material for the '68 Special.

Interesting research!

Although it's doubtful Leiber and Stoller personally submitted anything for the 1968 TV Special -- FECC member PStoller might be able to shed light on that -- it is interesting the songs made a shortlist.

"Not Me," Jerry and Mike's song, was the A-side in Dec 1962, the artist credited as "Billy Edd":


Image

Billboard - Dec 1, 1962


Billy Edd was very grateful for the support of Leiber and Stoller, and was asked to write some notes for a UK compilation:


Image

The Leiber and Stoller Story, Volume 3 (Ace, 2007)


I'm unsure if they got in, but here's a segment of Wheeler's prose:

Image


Thanks Doc!, I guess what I meant to say is that not so much that they personally submitted the material, but rather more than one song from their back catalogue got submitted for the television special. They hadn't submitted an original tune since 1962's "She's Not You" / "Just Tell Her Jim Said Hello." From that time onward they only had material submitted that had been recorded previously ("Girls!, Girls!, Girls!", "Bossa Nova Baby", "You're The Boss", "Little Egypt", "Fools Fall In Love", "Saved", "If You Don't Come Back", "Three Corn Patches").

It's always fascinated me how a guy like Billy Edd Wheeler from Boone County, West Virginia got into writing with hipsters like Leiber and Stoller. Not trying to be disrespectful, if you know what Boone County, WV is like, you'll know what I mean. It certainly isn't NYC or LA, which Leiber and Stoller were more attuned to. I guess most people look at Leiber and Stoller for the pop / R&B writings, but forget the country slanted songs such as the "Homer & Jethro" styled "Love Me" and "Jackson." I guess it's no coincidence then that June Carter recorded with Homer & Jethro ("Baby, It's Cold Outside") and also recorded "Jackson" with Johnny Cash.

Daryl

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 23, 2010 1:52 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:Although it's doubtful Leiber and Stoller personally submitted anything for the 1968 TV Special -- FECC member PStoller might be able to shed light on that -- it is interesting the songs made a shortlist.


I don't honestly know whether Jerry and Mike were behind the submission, if it was Billy Edd, or if it came about some other way. But, I do thank you fellas for bringing this up, because I somehow managed to omit "Not Me" from our official discography. (Oops.)

Billy Edd was very grateful for the support of Leiber and Stoller, and was asked to write some notes for a UK compilation … I'm unsure if they got in…


Billy Edd got two whole pages of the liner notes for that CD, in addition to separate comments about the Leiber/Wheeler hit, "Jackson." Obviously, there's more than what's in the excerpt you posted, including references to such songs as "The Reverend Mr. Black" and "After Taxes." However, the paragraph about "High Flyin' Bird" didn't make the final edit, so it's interesting to see it here.

It was Norman Gimbel who "discovered" Billy Edd Wheeler and introduced him to Jerry and Mike, a fortuitous meeting for all concerned. The praise and gratitude go both ways; Billy Edd is a great talent, and the guys love both the man and his work. I think he brought an invaluable dimension to L&S' catalog with his collaborations. I'm just sorry that Elvis didn't record those numbers in '68!

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 23, 2010 2:04 am

Interesting stuff, thanks Daryl

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 23, 2010 9:16 am

Hello,

Thanks everyone for the kind words. I think P. Stoller is right. Billy Edd Wheeler brought a lot to the Leiber / Stoller catalogue. In my opinion that it was a southern vernacular found in Tony Joe White songs. No New York hipster could write "we got married in a fever, hotter than a pepper sprout."

Speaking of Norman Gimbel, he does have a loose tie to Elvis. He wrote a Broadway play, "Whoop-Up." This play was based on Dan Cushman's novel "Stay Away, Joe", which of course Elvis starred in the film adaptation of the novel.

Daryl

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 23, 2010 9:33 am

Interesting thoughts and research,thanks Daryl

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:45 pm

WOW! How cool is that? Someone posts something.....then we actually the son of one Elvis songwriters to chip in.

I might be a Glambert nowadays but it's stuff like this that makes me come back to Elvis...........history!

Thanks....a very informative post.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Thu Jun 24, 2010 12:02 am

Little Darlin wrote:WOW! How cool is that? Someone posts something.....then we actually the son of one Elvis songwriters to chip in.

I might be a Glambert nowadays but it's stuff like this that makes me come back to Elvis...........history!

Thanks....a very informative post.

We have some very cool members here at FECC!

Not just me and you ;-)

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Thu Jun 24, 2010 6:29 am

Hello,

Just for the record, the page in question from the "'68 At 40" book is page 20. Also, I believe my initial post is somewhat wrong. Steve's notes list it as "Not Me (Truckstop Romance)" with lead sheet for "Not Me." So apparently they were looking at including "Not Me" in the '68 Special, not "Truckstop Romance." Also I'm glad I could be of assistance to PStoller in correcting an oversight in their official discography.

Daryl

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:01 am

Daryl wrote:I'm glad I could be of assistance to PStoller in correcting an oversight in their official discography.

Believe me, I can use all the help I can get!

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Fri Jun 25, 2010 5:07 am

Hello,

Well, with a back catalogue as legendary as Leiber and Stoller's, it easy to understand how an ommision could occur. I have a question for you, PStoller. There's an interview with Mike where he says that he'd heard that Elvis cut "Kansas City" during the 1969 sessions with Chips Moman. Do you have any idea where he heard this from? Were any Leiber / Stoller songs submitted to those sessions? "Kansas City" is one Leiber / Stoller song I would have loved to hear Elvis sing. Also, how late into Elvis' career did Leiber / Stoller songs get submitted. The last things he cut of Leiber / Stoller's catalog was "Three Corn Patches" and "If You Don't Come Back." in July 1973 at Stax. Prior to that, he hadn't cut a Leiber / Stoller song since 1968's "Saved". Would a guy like Freddy Bienstock come around regularly and ask for material for Elvis' next session or would he only come around sporadically and ask.

Here's a link to the interview I mentioned.

http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/intervi ... ller.shtml

Daryl

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Tue Jun 29, 2010 12:07 am

Daryl wrote:There's an interview with Mike where he says that he'd heard that Elvis cut "Kansas City" during the 1969 sessions with Chips Moman. Do you have any idea where he heard this from? Were any Leiber / Stoller songs submitted to those sessions?

Briefly, no, and not as far as I know.

Also, how late into Elvis' career did Leiber / Stoller songs get submitted. The last things he cut of Leiber / Stoller's catalog was "Three Corn Patches" and "If You Don't Come Back." in July 1973 at Stax. Prior to that, he hadn't cut a Leiber / Stoller song since 1968's "Saved". Would a guy like Freddy Bienstock come around regularly and ask for material for Elvis' next session or would he only come around sporadically and ask.

I was not in the business back then. I can ask around, but I doubt L&S made any direct submissions to Parker. That said, the '73 cuts were based directly on versions cut by T-Bone Walker in June of '73: someone must have rushed the T-Bone recordings to Elvis. It could easily have been Bienstock, who was a partner with L&S in the Hudson Bay Music Co. from 1969-1980.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Tue Jun 29, 2010 2:01 am

PStoller wrote:I was not in the business back then. I can ask around, but I doubt L&S made any direct submissions to Parker. That said, the '73 cuts were based directly on versions cut by T-Bone Walker in June of '73: someone must have rushed the T-Bone recordings to Elvis. It could easily have been Bienstock, who was a partner with L&S in the Hudson Bay Music Co. from 1969-1980.

Neat information, Peter.

Since you say T-Bone's sessions for Very Rare were completed in June, the songs almost certainly were presented to Felton Jarvis and Elvis on pre-release acetate.

Elvis cut "If You Don't Come Back," "Three Corn Patches" and "Just A Little Bit" in July at Stax, and Walker's album was not issued until October:


Image

Billboard - Oct 27, 1973


Elvis' album with these recordings was out only two weeks after T-Bone's set:


Image

Billboard - Nov 10, 1973


That review is kind of sad: "The raucous edge is gone from his voice."

Very Rare, on the other hand, was a pretty ambitious record from Walker:


Image

T-Bone Walker - Very Rare (Reprise 6483, 1973)


Side 1
1. Striking On You, Baby (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
2. Please Send Me Someone To Love (Percy Mayfield)
3. Brother Bill (The Last Clean Shirt) (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Evening (Harry White, Mitchell Parish)
5. The Come Back (L. C. Fraser)

Side 2
1. Your Picture Done Faded (Paul Howard)
2. Don't Give Me The Run Around (T-Bone Walker)
3. Hard Times (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Everyday I Have The Blues (Peter Chatman)
5. Person To Person (Charles Singleton, Teddy McRae)

Side 3
1. Fever (Eddie Cooley, John Davenport)
2. Three Corn Patches (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
3. I'm Still In Love With You (T-Bone Walker)
4. Just A Little Bit (Earl Washington, John Thornton, Pitney Brown, Ralph Bass)
5. James Junior (Charles Otis)

Side 4
1. Been Down So Long (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
2. If You Don't Come Back (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
3. Kansas City (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller)
4. Well, I Done Got Over It (Eddie "Guitar Slim" Jones)
5. Stormy Monday (T-Bone Walker)


Backing vocals by the Sweet Inspirations, too!


From: http://www.discogs.com/T-Bone-Walker-Very-Rare/release/2091488

This release, one of the last recordings put down by T-Bone Walker two years before his death, is exceptional by design alone.

Produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, these 20 tracks were recorded in 1973 with the A-line of early 70's LA session players, quite a number of sidemen already major jazz artists themselves, a big band horn-section and The Sweet Inspirations as the vocal backing.

Musicians like Wilton Felder, Michael Omartian, James Booker, Jom Gordon, Dean Parks and Larry Carlton are heard together with jazz-legends like Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Zoot Sims, Al Cohn, Herbie Mann and blues singer Charles Brown is heard on piano only.

Throughout the 20 tracks the musicians are shuffled from track to track, which actually makes the records more equal than one could expect - but unfortunately also equally neat, more blues by definition than by feeling.

Here again with a horn section - as he often was on his 50s Imperial recordings - one could have hoped for more of that receipt, slow, toned and soaked in brass, but instead of a late-night club feeling, you end up with a feeling just as was the most likely the atmosphere during recordings: blues by broad daylight.

Impressive credits though.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Tue Jun 29, 2010 6:53 am

drjohncarpenter wrote:Since you say T-Bone's sessions for Very Rare were completed in June, the songs almost certainly were presented to Felton Jarvis and Elvis on pre-release acetate.

Forgive me; I was checking the wrong dates. The recording sessions were mostly in April and May, with the tunes in question apparently recorded on May 2; the mixes were performed later. It being 1973, they may have sent cassettes or 1/4" dubs of early rough mixes any time after the recording.

That review is kind of sad: "The raucous edge is gone from his voice."

In a way, it's as kind as it is sad; there's a lot more missing than raucous edge on that album.

Very Rare, on the other hand, was a pretty ambitious record from Walker…

Well, it was labor of love for L&S. They knew that T-Bone wasn't going to be around much longer, and they wanted to cut a no-holds-barred album with him before he was gone. Alas, he barely had any voice left in '73; then came the stroke in '74, and he passed in '75. I'd kinda like to take a crack at remixing the album, but nobody would pay for it. It's already been reissued on a couple of labels, and I doubt we could sell more than a hundred copies of another version. So, it'd have to be a labor of love for me, too.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Tue Jun 29, 2010 7:14 am

Is it possible that Mike was somewhat mistaken, and that "Kansas City" was submitted during Elvis' July '73 Stax sessions, since the song appeared on T-Bone's "Very Rare" 2 LP set?

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 30, 2010 12:33 am

PStoller wrote:Forgive me; I was checking the wrong dates. The recording sessions were mostly in April and May, with the tunes in question apparently recorded on May 2; the mixes were performed later. It being 1973, they may have sent cassettes or 1/4" dubs of early rough mixes any time after the recording ... Well, it was labor of love for L&S. They knew that T-Bone wasn't going to be around much longer, and they wanted to cut a no-holds-barred album with him before he was gone. Alas, he barely had any voice left in '73; then came the stroke in '74, and he passed in '75. I'd kinda like to take a crack at remixing the album, but nobody would pay for it. It's already been reissued on a couple of labels, and I doubt we could sell more than a hundred copies of another version. So, it'd have to be a labor of love for me, too.

Thanks for the additional information. If I had the money, I'd pay for the remixed album myself.


Daryl wrote:Is it possible that Mike was somewhat mistaken, and that "Kansas City" was submitted during Elvis' July '73 Stax sessions, since the song appeared on T-Bone's "Very Rare" 2 LP set?

I, too, noticed "Kansas City" on the collection.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 30, 2010 1:01 am

Daryl wrote:Is it possible that Mike was somewhat mistaken, and that "Kansas City" was submitted during Elvis' July '73 Stax sessions, since the song appeared on T-Bone's "Very Rare" 2 LP set?

He could have confused Moman for Jarvis; anything is possible. However, he has a better memory for minute detail than most people. More likely, whoever told him was mistaken either about when and with whom or the fact that it happened at all. In any case, the story is that it was a backing track over which Elvis never recorded a vocal, so even if it's true, it's moot.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 30, 2010 8:54 am

What I've always wondered about is in 1972 when Elvis performed at Madison Square Garden, at the press conference where Elvis is asked why he didn't record more Rock & Roll songs, to which he replied, "I would if I could find some good ones" or something to that effect. Did Leiber & Stoller ever see that clip on the evening news and think of writing new rock songs for Elvis specifically?

On the same tangent, I always thought it would have been cool if Elvis would have done a Rock & Roll album, similiar in concept to John Lennon's 1975 album. An album of '50s and early '60s rock classics around 1972 or early 1973. I hate to say it but by 1973 Elvis needed an infusion of fresh rock material into his live repertoire that he hadn't done before. Don't get me wrong, I love "What Now My Love", "It's Over" etc but it only got worse and worse. He was incorporating more country, MOR pop and gospel than blues or rock into his shows.
Could you imagine an album featuring Burning Love along with 10 or 12 of these numbers or other numbers from these artists.

Ray Charles
Leave My Woman Alone
Mess Around

Larry Williams
Slow Down

Little Richard
Send Me Some Lovin'

Sam Cooke
Bring It On Home To Me
Having A Party
You Send Me
Cupid

Carl Perkins
Matchbox

Johnny Cash
Folsom Prison Blues / I Walk The Line

Bobby Darin
Early In The Morning

Jerry Lee Lewis
Great Balls Of Fire

Buddy Holly
True Love Ways

Roy Orbison
Only The Lonely
Running Scared

Rick Nelson
Travelin Man
Hello Mary Lou
Lonesome Town
Believe What You Say
It's Late

Gene Pitney
I'm Gonna Be Strong

Wilbert Harrison
Kansas City

Drifters / Ben E. King
Stand By Me
Save The Last Dance For Me
Under The Boardwalk

Beatles
I Saw Her Standing There
I Feel Fine
Get Back (I know this is late '60s but I included it nonetheless)

Conway Twitty
It's Only Make Believe

Roy Hamilton
Don't Let Go
You Can Have Her

Eddie Cochran
C'mon Everybody
Summertime Blues
Twenty Flight Rock

Gene Vincent
Be-Bop-A-Lula

Chuck Berry
No Particular Place To Go
Brown Eyed Handsome Man
School Day (full version)
Promised Land (done earlier in 1973 or in 1972)

Fats Domino
Blue Monday

Bill Haley
Rock Around The Clock

Jackie Brentson & Delta Cats
Rocket 88

Big Joe Turner
Rock Around The Clock
Flip, Flop And Fly

If Elvis' vocals and Felton's producing was up to par, which they weren't in July '73, an album of this material could have helped the momentum continue post-Aloha. Who knows, maybe you'd even bring Scotty, D.J. and the Jordanaires back into the fold too along with James Burton and some members of the TCB rhythm section. I know the "Elvis Country" album was a country album so to speak, but I don't think they went into those sessions with the mindset that they were going to make a "country album" per se. Did Elvis ever go into the studio with a mindset of what kind of album he was going to record? I wish he would have done a rock album in that manner. I also wish he would have experimented more in the studio, revisiting older songs that he'd recorded with new arrangements (slow bluesy live version of Hound Dog comes to mind). In 1974 maybe he should have revisited "That's All Right" for the 20th anniversary since he started out. Maybe he should have done it on the "Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis" LP. They could have pulled that out as a single. Maybe he even could have performed "Memphis" live during the "Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis" show/ LP. RCA should not have let the 20th Anniversary of Elvis' first commercial release pass without acknowledging it (1974). Nor should they have let the 20th Years with RCA have passed without even acknowledging it (1975). They acknowledged the 10th anniversary of his signing with RCA with the "Elvis For Everyone" LP in 1965.
Last edited by Daryl on Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:02 am

A venture like this would have been a winner but not with the TCB band.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:09 am

Daryl wrote:What I've always wondered about is in 1972 when Elvis performed at Madison Square Garden, at the press conference where Elvis is asked why he didn't record more Rock & Roll songs, to which he replied, "I would if I could find some good ones" or something to that effect. Did Leiber & Stoller ever see that clip on the evening news and think of writing new rock songs for Elvis specifically?

On the same tangent, I always thought it would have been cool if Elvis would have done a Rock & Roll album, similiar in concept to John Lennon's 1975 album. An album of '50s and early '60s rock classics around 1972 or early 1973. I hate to say it but by 1973 Elvis needed an infusion of fresh rock material into his live repertoire that he hadn't done before. Don't get me wrong, I love "What Now My Love", "It's Over" etc but it only got worse and worse. He was incorporating more country, MOR pop and gospel than blues or rock into his shows.
Could you imagine an album featuring Burning Love along with 10 or 12 of these numbers or other numbers from these artists.

Ray Charles
Leave My Woman Alone
Mess Around

Larry Williams
Slow Down

Little Richard
Send Me Some Lovin'

Sam Cooke
Bring It On Home To Me
Having A Party
You Send Me
Cupid

Carl Perkins
Matchbox

Johnny Cash
Folsom Prison Blues / I Walk The Line

Bobby Darin
Early In The Morning

Jerry Lee Lewis
Great Balls Of Fire

Buddy Holly
True Love Ways

Roy Orbison
Only The Lonely
Running Scared

Rick Nelson
Travelin Man
Hello Mary Lou
Lonesome Town
Believe What You Say
It's Late

Gene Pitney
I'm Gonna Be Strong

Wilbert Harrison
Kansas City

Drifters / Ben E. King
Stand By Me
Save The Last Dance For Me
Under The Boardwalk

Beatles
I Saw Her Standing There
I Feel Fine
Get Back (I know this is late '60s but I included it nonetheless)

Conway Twitty
It's Only Make Believe

Roy Hamilton
Don't Let Go
You Can Have Her

Eddie Cochran
C'mon Everybody
Summertime Blues
Twenty Flight Rock

Gene Vincent
Be-Bop-A-Lula

Chuck Berry
No Particular Place To Go
Brown Eyed Handsome Man
School Day (full version)
Promised Land (done earlier in 1973 or in 1972)

Fats Domino
Blue Monday

Bill Haley
Rock Around The Clock

Jackie Brentson & Delta Cats
Rocket 88

Big Joe Turner
Rock Around The Clock
Flip, Flop And Fly

If Elvis' vocals and Felton's producing was up to par, which they weren't in July '73, an album of this material could have helped the momentum continue post-Aloha. Who knows, maybe you'd even bring Scotty, D.J. and the Jordanaires back into the fold too along with James Burton and some members of the TCB rhythm section. I know the "Elvis Country" album was a country album so to speak, but I don't think they went into those sessions with the mindset that they were going to make a "country album" per se. Did Elvis ever go into the studio with a mindset of what kind of album he was going to record? I wish he would have done a rock album in that manner. I also wish he would have experimented more in the studio, revisiting older songs that he'd recorded with new arrangements (slow bluesy live version of Hound Dog comes to mind). In 1974 maybe he should have revisited "That's All Right" for the 20th anniversary since he started out. Maybe he should have done on the "Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis" LP. They could have pulled that out as a single. Maybe he even could have performed "Memphis" live during the "Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis" show/ LP. RCA should not have let the 20th Anniversary of Elvis' first commercial release pass without acknowledging it (1974). Nor should they have let the 20th Years with RCA have passed without even acknowledging it (1975). They acknowledged the 10th anniversary of his signing with RCA with the "Elvis For Everyone" LP in 1965.


I think doing a rock n' roll oldies album would be considered a retread and a giant step backwards by Elvis.
He was wanting to be viewed as a contemporary artist by the early 70's and doing a oldies album would defeat that purpose.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:16 am

brian wrote:... doing a rock n' roll oldies album would be considered a retread and a giant step backwards by Elvis.
He was wanting to be viewed as a contemporary artist by the early 70's and doing a oldies album would defeat that purpose.

Agree 100%.

Elvis' reply at the MSG press conference regarding "hard rock songs" was diplomatic. He had little interest in the genre in June 1972, or he would have told the room about his next RCA single, Dennis Linde's "Burning Love," a fabulous rock 'n' roll song.

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:18 am

Who said the album had to be all oldies? Hey if he can find two or three contemporary rock songs, that have a '50s - early '60s feel to them, why not do them. "Burning Love" very much had that. The "Hunka-Hunka Burning Love" compared well with 1959's "A Big Hunk O' Love." Granted, he wasn't going to find 12 original rock / R&B based originals. By 1972, he was struggling to find one good rock song. Like I said, if he could find anywhere between 1 to 3 good rock songs and fill out the album with old rock / R&B songs, he could have made a much better album than his last secular studio output, "Elvis Now" or his next studio output "Elvis (Fool)." I don't know about you, but I'd much rather hear Elvis sing "Brown Eyed Handsome Man" and "You Can Have Her" than "MIracle Of The Rosary" or "Love Me, Love The Life I Lead."

Re: Truckstop Romance / Not Me - '68 at 40 book

Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:20 am

I think doing a rock n' roll oldies album would be considered a retread and a giant step backwards by Elvis.
He was wanting to be viewed as a contemporary artist by the early 70's and doing a oldies album would defeat that purpose.


Doing the oldies in 1968 did Elvis a power of good.

And John Lennon suffered no harm in taking that route in 1975