Anything about Elvis
More than 30 Million visitors can't be wrong

Any chance of remastered re-releases of 2001 CD's?

Thu Jul 03, 2003 4:08 pm

Now the 2001 label is under new management, would there be any chance that they would re-release the previous released CD's? And than I mean, with remastered sound...

Imagine the "Opening '72" CD, with a killing performance of Elvis. The sound on this release is way too soft. This could be the chance for '2001' to do justice to this incrible show.

Same goes to the "Birmingham In Birmingham" release. The show is better than the "a Hot Winter Night In Dallas" (Fort Baxter), but the sound isn't as good as it could be with some remastering.

I can understand that they won't do anything with the excellent "Stand By Me" set, since '2001' released the "How Great Thou Art Sessions" CD's. But it would be a golden opportunity to re-release remastered versions of "Burning In..." and "Opening Night '72"...

Will we ever see this happening? Just a few import labels have re-released their CD's with improved sound or artwork.

Re: Any chance of remastered re-releases of 2001 CD's?

Thu Jul 03, 2003 7:49 pm

Albert wrote:Now the 2001 label is under new management, would there be any chance that they would re-release the previous released CD's? And than I mean, with remastered sound...

Imagine the "Opening '72" CD, with a killing performance of Elvis. The sound on this release is way too soft. This could be the chance for '2001' to do justice to this incrible show.

Same goes to the "Birmingham In Birmingham" release. The show is better than the "a Hot Winter Night In Dallas" (Fort Baxter), but the sound isn't as good as it could be with some remastering.

I can understand that they won't do anything with the excellent "Stand By Me" set, since '2001' released the "How Great Thou Art Sessions" CD's. But it would be a golden opportunity to re-release remastered versions of "Burning In..." and "Opening Night '72"...

Will we ever see this happening? Just a few import labels have re-released their CD's with improved sound or artwork.


Both sound quality and "artwork" of about 95% of import releases are substandard to what is released officially. And I'm afraid that no matter what these "labels" do the improvement won't be that much. This has to do with the relatively limited equipment, the lack of knowledge and of course creativity. With the exception of probably only Finding The Way Home I have never seen an import release that even came close to an official release. These are people who bought a tape but who don't necessarily know how to master. It takes years and years of pratice and experience to master a record properly.

BTW how do you remaster a one-channel-recording?

Thu Jul 03, 2003 8:45 pm

In terms of packaging I think there have been a number of import releases that put the official releases (for that time period) to shame. Of course there have also been some poor ones, and it stands to reason that sound quality will be consistently better on official releases, than it is on unofficial products.

Sometimes I think we fans are far too critical of the sound quality on both imported and FTD releases. The quality of soundboard tapes varies, but in most cases it is quite acceptable, and a little tape hiss or distortion on a soundboard tape is better option to me than an audience recording of the same show that was taped from under somebody’s overcoat at the back of the hall.

Neither BMG or the bootleggers can remix soundboard tapes, so in most cases what you hear on these releases is as good as it gets.

Thu Jul 03, 2003 11:36 pm

rockinrebel wrote:In terms of packaging I think there have been a number of import releases that put the official releases (for that time period) to shame.


Which ones do you have in mind?

Sometimes I think we fans are far too critical of the sound quality on both imported and FTD releases. The quality of soundboard tapes varies, but in most cases it is quite acceptable, and a little tape hiss or distortion on a soundboard tape is better option to me than an audience recording of the same show that was taped from under somebody’s overcoat at the back of the hall.


Personally I prefer a good audience recording to less atmospheric soundboard (oh no, the old discussion again! ;-)).

Anyway, I didn't want to be overcritical and put all of them imports down. Some of hem are real essentials no question. I only wondered how they could be improved, I don't think there's a way for bootleggers to improve a re-release like BMG or FTD can ... That was all.

Neither BMG or the bootleggers can remix soundboard tapes, so in most cases what you hear on these releases is as good as it gets.


Well, if you listen closely to New Years Eve '76 I pretty much think they did by parting different frequency ranges to different tracks and "re-mixed" the whole thing this way. At least this is what I can imagine. But I think you need some know-how to do this.

Thu Jul 03, 2003 11:39 pm

Here's an idea... what if you take a soundboard and overlay an audience recording over the top of it, but low in the mix... so you get the great sound and the audiences' reaction...

What do you all think?

Fri Jul 04, 2003 12:08 am

Which ones do you have in mind?


Back in the late '70's & early eighties the packaging and content of many unofficial albums was far better than RCA's own efforts at the time. Good examples would be the Audifon releases, the original Pittsburgh album "Rockin New Years Eve", "The Legend Lives On", and the three volume "Rockin' Rebel" series. More recently I think the long box format "There's Always Me" series could possibly have influenced the way BMG now present their box sets, and the Madison label have always presented their releases very well with the added inclusion of informative sleeve notes which is always a nice touch. The booklet included with Southern Style’s “Finding The Way Home” also springs to mind here. It’s also worth noting that BMG/FTD now release Elvis’ concerts with cover photographs that are either from or close to the date of the actual show, and I would say the unofficial releases have been a real influence here.

Personally I prefer a good audience recording to less atmospheric soundboard (oh no, the old discussion again! ;-)).


I also enjoy a good audience recording, and agree that they often capture the atmosphere of a live show better than a soundboard recording does. However, there was a time when a good audience recording was the best we could hope for, and we now have a collector’s label releasing soundboard tapes, along with an abundance of unofficial releases offering similar material, and some fans still don’t appear to be happy with what they are getting.

Well, if you listen closely to New Years Eve '76 I pretty much think they did by parting different frequency ranges to different tracks and "re-mixed" the whole thing this way. At least this is what I can imagine. But I think you need some know-how to do this.


The point I was trying to make here is that if a mono soundboard tape is slightly distorted, has a flat sounding mix, or the organ is mixed way too high, it’s never going to sound like one of Elvis’ official live albums, and we have to accept that due to the age of these recordings and the manner in which they were recorded in the first place, there are going to be some imperfections.

Fri Jul 04, 2003 11:31 am

Hi y'all!

I have always wondered what the result would've been, if Fort Baxter had released Burning in Birmingham and Opening Night 72, instead of 2001!?

If you compare Birmingham with Wichita (Fort Baxter), the latter is obviously a much better product, soundwise.
The 2001 release of Birmingham suffer from (I think) a poor job done by the person(s) behind it.

Same goes for Opening Night 72. Unbelievable low sound picture!
Why on earth did they leave it like this?
I DON'T believe that they did all they could've done!

That said, I understand that the cassettes (taken from the mixingboard) used for these soundboard releases can DIFFER in quality...

Br
Kristian