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December 31, 1955 Louisiana Hayride Performance

Wed Jun 18, 2003 12:02 pm

December 31, 1955
Shreveport, LA
Louisiana Hayride

Songs performed:
Heartbreak Hotel
Blue Suede Shoes
Peace In The Valley


Can this in any way be possible? More specifically, did this happen?

Wed Jun 18, 2003 4:14 pm

The “Elvis Day By Day” book confirms that this performance took place, although no track list is published. The book also makes reference to Elvis’ performance at the Hayride on Saturday, December, 17 and states that, “Elvis performs six songs including Tennessee Ernie Ford’s hit ‘Sixteen Tons’, The Platters ‘Only You’, and Little Richard’s ‘Tutti Frutti’”.

Wed Jun 18, 2003 4:17 pm

Thanks RR!

I found this track list on another website with quite an extensive, well documented breakdown of all of Presley's appearances.
(you may already know the site)
Not knowing the source of the information, should I assume that the track list is a fabrication?

Wed Jun 18, 2003 4:29 pm

Hi Brad,

Not having any further details of the performance I couldn’t say for sure whether the set list is correct. The reason I posted the information about the songs performed on December 17, 1955 is because the next time the book makes reference to the songs Elvis is known to have performed at the Hayride after December 31, 1955, is an entry for Saturday January 14, 1956, and this states that Elvis performed “Baby Let’s Play House”, “I Got A Woman”, “Only You”, “Tutti Frutti”, and “That’s All Right”. As this set list bears certain similarities to what is known to have been performed on December 17, 1955, I think it’s reasonable to assume that Elvis’ performance from December 31, 1955 could have featured a similar set list, but unfortunately I can’t confirm this.

Fri Jun 20, 2003 9:26 pm

Just wondered if anyone else knew whether or not it was possible that Elvis sang
"Heartbreak Hotel" and "Blue Suede Shoes" in December of 1955?

Fri Jun 20, 2003 9:49 pm

elvis-fan wrote:Just wondered if anyone else knew whether or not it was possible that Elvis sang
"Heartbreak Hotel" and "Blue Suede Shoes" in December of 1955?


"Heartbreak Hotel" was added to the band's live repertoire in December 1955 doing it as early as Dec. 2 at a Mobile, Alabama radio concert. Elvis also did it on Friday night, Dec. 9 in Swifton, Arkansas, and with a Hayride performance the next night, yes, very possible he did "Hotel" live on KWKH Shreveport.

As for "Blue Suede Shoes", Elvis surely heard Carl doing it live in November '55 when they toured together occassionally. Carl recorded the single master at Sun on December 19. I don't know if Elvis had covered Carl's song live in December but possibly not.
RCA was pushing Elvis to hype his own C&W single: "I Forgot To remember To Forget" But Elvis was doing "Hotel" to hype its own impending release as the eagerly-anticipated follow-up to "I Forgot To remember To Forget"

"Blue Suede Shoes" as done by Elvis wasn't studio-mastered until January 30, 1956. Elvis was probably doing it live in January but we know not on his TV performance that month. Carl and Sam Phillips really didn't want RCA/Elvis to do it as a competing single. But they did.

Sat Jun 21, 2003 2:41 am

Graceland Gardener wrote:"Blue Suede Shoes" as done by Elvis wasn't studio-mastered until January 30, 1956. Elvis was probably doing it live in January but we know not on his TV performance that month. Carl and Sam Phillips really didn't want RCA/Elvis to do it as a competing single. But they did.


Actually, they ("RCA/Elvis") did not release it as a competing single. The <u>facts</u> are below.

Read and learn!!

After RCA's Steve Sholes personally assured Sam Phillips they would not try to compete with Carl's Sun single, Elvis' version of "Blue Suede Shoes" first saw issue in March 1956 on the <u>extended</u> <u>play</u> <u>(EP)</u> Elvis Presley (EPA-747), and the full album Elvis Presley (LPM-1254).

Elvis gave the tune a ride on his 11 February network TV "Dorsey Brothers Stage Show" appearance in New York, and would play it there again on 17 March. A third and final live TV rendition came on the April "Milton Berle" program.

At the same time, Carl's original version on Sun <u>single</u> 234 was approaching #2. Elvis peaked at #20 with his <u>EP</u> cover version in early April.

Carl's classic managed 17 total weeks on Billboard's singles chart, Elvis' cover from the EP only 5.

Later in the year, around October, RCA released the twelve cut Elvis Presley album on six singles, plus two more: "Shake, Rattle & Roll" / "Lawdy Miss Clawdy" and "Love Me Tender" / "Any Way You Want Me." None of these singles charted except, of course, the title track to Presley's film debut.

God bless!
Last edited by drjohncarpenter on Sat Jun 21, 2003 4:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

Sat Jun 21, 2003 4:02 am

Doc -

Later in the year, around October, RCA released the twelve cut Elvis Presley album on six singles, plus two more: "Tutti Frutti" / "Shake, Rattle & Roll" and "Love Me Tender" / "Any Way You Want Me." None of these singles charted except, of course, the title track to Presley's film debut


Actually, that coupling was "Lawdy Miss Clawdy/Shake Rattle & Roll".

"Tutti Frutti" was coupled with "Blue Suede Shoes" - a single which never charted but eventually went gold !

Sat Jun 21, 2003 4:36 am

Correct! Good catch on my typo. Now corrected above.

Sat Jun 21, 2003 7:03 am

Actually one other record did chart from the 8 singles released in September/October 1956. Blue Moon peaked at #55 after 17 weeks on Billboard's Top 100.
Also, Elvis' version of "Blue Suede Shoes" charted for 12 weeks.
Perkins' version tallied 21 weeks.

jeff R

Sat Jun 21, 2003 7:16 am

This is interesting. We've seen post after post from certain individuals about what a jerk the Doc is, and how he condescendingly never admits guilt when he is wrong, etc. From these posts, you'd think no one likes the Doc. Now, we have a case where the Doc made a typo, yet it took an hour and a half for any one to say anything, and the one person that made a comment did it in a polite way, followed by a gracious reply from the Doc thanking the poster and acknowledging and correcting the mistake. I figured there would be people lining up to rip the Doc apart the first time he made an error, but it just did not happen. Maybe the Doc haters are in the minority. Thanks to Doc and ColinB for an unusually civil exchange! You guys have raised the bar, now I have to try harder to be nice to Genesim!

Greg

Sat Jun 21, 2003 8:52 am

jeffreyjames wrote:Also, Elvis' version of "Blue Suede Shoes" charted for 12 weeks.
Perkins' version tallied 21 weeks.

jeff R


These aren't Billboard's "top 40" chart figures (as mine were). Where is this information from?

Sat Jun 21, 2003 4:36 pm

These figures are from Joel Whitburn's Billboard Top Pop Singles 1955-1996......8th Edition.

jeff R

Sun Jun 22, 2003 1:53 am

jeffreyjames wrote:These figures are from Joel Whitburn's Billboard Top Pop Singles 1955-1996......8th Edition.


Interesting. My edition is slightly older, and yet the data on hits from 1956 has apparently changed. I wonder how that happened.

Sun Jun 22, 2003 6:11 am

I think I know what you mean, Dr. I had the older editions, too. I think he made some revisions with the 6th or 7th edition of his book. He included all the Billboard charts... The Top 100, Best Sellers, Most Played By Jockeys, Most Played In Juke Boxes. All These charts were combined in some way to come up with the listings from 1955-08-04-58 when the Hot 100 began. Then there was just the one chart until 1984 when they started the Singles Sales and Airplay charts again.
I think that's why sometimes there are arguments about how many #1's Elvis actually had on the pop charts. The old books did not include "I Wand You, I Need You, I Love You" OR "Hard Headed Woman". All editions since #6 or #7 include these two as #1's. They made #1 on one or two of the charts but not the Top 100 chart. The Billboard books have done this with every charted artist from those couple years.

jeff R

Sun Jun 22, 2003 12:12 pm

jeffrey -

Looks as if you Americans have the same problems as we do in the UK with regards to chart positions !

So tell me, did the single 'Blue Suede Shoes/Tutti Frutti' enter the US charts, and if so, what was its highest position ?

Mon Jun 23, 2003 3:34 am

Hi Colin,

The single "Blue Suede Shoes / Tutti Frutti" did not make the charts. However, the song "Blue Suede Shoes" from the EP "Heartbreak Hotel" did
enter the singles chart and peaked at #20 and was listed for 12 weeks.
All the singles from all the charts are listed at my web pages if you'd like to check them out. I don't think I've added the last two singles from Elvis yet. I will try to do that this week. I've been behind. Here's my web address:

http://www.homestead.com/ElvisforSale/e ... cords.html

My web site is also listed as a link on this very wonderful web site.

jeff R

Mon Jun 23, 2003 3:51 am

jeffreyjames wrote:Hi Colin,

The single "Blue Suede Shoes / Tutti Frutti" did not make the charts. However, the song "Blue Suede Shoes" from the EP "Heartbreak Hotel" did
enter the singles chart and peaked at #20 and was listed for 12 weeks.
All the singles from all the charts are listed at my web pages if you'd like to check them out. I don't think I've added the last two singles from Elvis yet. I will try to do that this week. I've been behind. Here's my web address:

http://www.homestead.com/ElvisforSale/e ... cords.html

My web site is also listed as a link on this very wonderful web site.

jeff R


THAT'S IS STRANGE JEFF HOW COME THAT THE EP MADE THE CHARTS
AND NOT THE 45 SINGLE.

CURTIS SIMPKINS

Mon Jun 23, 2003 4:07 am

Because the EP was released in ealy March of 1956 - just as Elvis waa exploding on the national secne. The single was not put out until August of 1956. By that point, E's version of Blue Suede Shoes had already run its course on the charts.

Mike C

Mon Jun 23, 2003 5:48 am

You are so correct, Mike C.
Elvis had 17 songs hit the singles charts in 1956. Totally unheard of until the Beatles amassed a whopping 30 songs on the Hot 100 in their debut year in the states.
Out of the 17 Elvis songs that hit the charts in 1956, 7 were from extended plays. It was also very unusual for an artists "ep's" to hit the singles charts. Sometime in 1957, this method was changed. Billboard created an EP Chart. But in 1962, songs from ep's began to hit the singles charts again (for example, "Follow That Dream" & "King Of The Whole Wide World"). Then in 1964 if a song from an ep charted, the WHOLE ep charted! Confused yet? Who wouldn't be. I guess it was a good thing that ep's were discontinued in '67 or so. Who knows what other changes they would have done with the charts.

jeff R

Mon Jun 23, 2003 11:02 am

The Elvis coupling 'Blue Suede Shoes/Tutti Frutti' was not a regular single release.

RCA just made Elvis' 1st LP available as 6 singles.

This is the full story:

RCA adopted a somewhat chaotic release policy in the US.
They released no fewer than seven Presley singles simultaneously on August 31st, 1956.
Six of these represented his first album as singles (to be on the safe side they also issued it as three EP’s); the seventh was the coupling: Lawdy, Miss Clawdy/Shake, Rattle & Roll.
Then Dewey Phillips – the Memphis DJ - started playing a preview acetate of the Love Me Tender title track.
This generated such public interest that the release of the Love Me Tender single was brought forward to 28th September.
Somehow, in this profusion of material, the Lawdy, Miss Clawdy/Shake, Rattle & Roll single got overlooked and failed to chart. Ironically, a 4-track EP : Elvis Presley - which included these two titles sold so well that it reached No.55 in the singles chart and eventually achieved an RIAA Gold award!
In the UK, a different release policy saw Lawdy, Miss Clawdy reach No. 15 as the flip of Trying To Get To You in Nov. 1957.


What no-one has mentioned is that Elvis' single of 'Blue Suede Shoes' came some 6 months after Carl Perkins had a smash hit with it !