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Proof!?.

Wed Sep 21, 2005 9:53 am

It has been said through the years that EP did not like the song BURNING LOVE.

This quote has been said to have come from JD SUMNER.

After talking to fellow fan"s who have seen the ON TOUR dvd"s (2nd vol),this seem"s to have been shot out of the water,with the power EP put in to this song,and also doing it on stage a lot in the nexxt few years etc.

Was JD talking about that EP did not want to record the song,and this qoute was taking out off context?.

To say HE never liked the song,then for EP to do it on stage etc!?.

And were does this org quote come from anyway?.

Wed Sep 21, 2005 9:58 am

I'm not aware of a direct quote from someone associated with Elvis. I've always viewed it as an assumption made by writers because Elvis never made it a regular part of his live show.

Wed Sep 21, 2005 10:03 am

I don't know how many folks might have said it, however Marty said on AEK several times that Elvis didn't like Burning Love.

Eileen

Wed Sep 21, 2005 10:16 am

Eileen wrote:...however Marty said on AEK several times that Elvis didn't like Burning Love.



But there is an ointment he could have, oh! oops sorry!!!! :oops:

:wink:

Wed Sep 21, 2005 10:23 am

I just think that "Burning Love" was not the song for him at the moment- I.E. March '72. He was depressed and in no mood for rocking. But he wound up doing a knockout version anyway.

It's true he wouldn't have added it to the act prior to it becoming a hit single if he didn't like the song. Further, he re-added it to the act in 1975 something he did not do for other recent hits like "Kentucky Rain", "In the Ghetto" or even popular '50s and '60s songs like "His Latest Flame", "Don't", "Hard Headed Woman", "She's Not You" etc. Plus, many of the '75 versions rock with conviction.

Wed Sep 21, 2005 10:39 am

Agreed, likethebike! I think the fact he added "Burning Love" to his shows in ´75 (performed it at nearly every show during spring and summer, and it stayed in his set for a while in ´76) is actually proof of the opposite - he did like the song! What other reason was there for him to start singing a three-year old song, in a really rockin´ version, night after night?

Wed Sep 21, 2005 11:37 am

Hav-A-Tampa wrote:What other reason was there for him to start singing a three-year old song, in a really rockin´ version, night after night?

How many other recent uptempo chart hits did he have to choose from?

Eileen

Wed Sep 21, 2005 12:32 pm

Hav-A-Tampa wrote:in a really rockin´ version, night after night?


Listen to the version from March 1976 that is featured on the Legendary Performer Volume 6 CD.

Especially through headphones, you really appreciate what a great guitar player James Burton was at that time.

Wed Sep 21, 2005 12:45 pm

Eileen wrote:
Hav-A-Tampa wrote:What other reason was there for him to start singing a three-year old song, in a really rockin´ version, night after night?

How many other recent uptempo chart hits did he have to choose from?

Eileen


Well, maybe not that many! But you can tell the difference when he´s singing a song because he wants to himself, and because he does it to please the crowd.

Wed Sep 21, 2005 1:34 pm

Maybe what likethebike wrote it´s right.... He was not in the mood to record the song... I guess he liked the song and also saw the potential of including this recent hit in Aloha concert... In 1975, he "met" this song again and included in his concerts taking turns with Polk Salad Annie...

Wed Sep 21, 2005 2:01 pm

Eileen -

About that little rider in green which forms part of your signature; is it there for legal reasons ?

So what happens if I copy one of your posts to another MB ?

Do I get a visit from the suits ?

I think we should be told !

Thu Sep 22, 2005 1:49 am

ColinB wrote:I think we should be told !

Pssst.... okay, I'll tell you! ;)

No, don't think it holds legal weight - it's more of a moral reminder about netiquette. I'd been seeing a trend toward folks being IMO too cavalier... publishing board posts on websites, copying to other boards, outing handles, changing context....

I don't mean to wag a finger and say it's always some horrible thing. It can be helpful and folks can be thoughtful about it. I've done it. It's certainly true that once a post is on the internet it's out there (and the reason to activate brain first, fingers last).

Just last night I saw two recent posts from this board pasted onto another board and used for personal (not informational) reasons. Perhaps our fellow FECC members didn't want to become involved in a skirmish on another board, but now someone has made that decision for them.

We all stand in the yard or on a sidewalk and talk to our neighbors - that doesn't mean we would drive down the street holding a bullhorn and hollering the same comments.

Eileen

Thu Sep 22, 2005 1:58 am

There certainly seems to be a lot of "something" like added echo or distortion on the master's vocal track. What do you reckon Felton did? Elvis sounds far different on this song to anything else he did at these sessions.

Thu Sep 22, 2005 3:23 am

I'm not sure that Elvis paid attention to his chart fortunes in the 1970s. He would have just as likely added an uptempo number from the 1950s as he would have a recent hit.

It's also worth noting that the song was never done in a medley. It was always full length. No 50 seconds for "Burning Love."

Thu Sep 22, 2005 9:48 am

And other thing is, that Elvis always had trouble remembering the lyrics for "Burning Love" (had to read them from a sheet in April ´72, cue cards held up in Aloha, etc etc) - so he must have liked the song enough to memorize the words in ´75. It would have been much easier to never perform the song again after the Aloha show.

Fri Sep 23, 2005 3:56 pm

The argument that Elvis came to like Burning Love by 75 is pretty convincing. Some good points here.

Eileen

Burning Love

Fri Sep 23, 2005 5:45 pm

I don't think it was a case of Elvis disliking Burning Love - according to Ernst's Life In Music book he was unconvinced of it's potential despite everyone insisting he should record it. Maybe JD interpreted that initial reluctance as a personal dislike...

As said in the first post!

Fri Sep 23, 2005 6:07 pm

This thread is about "Burning Love" - but something I find very strange is that he never performed two other songs recorded at the same session: "Always On My Mind" and "Separate Ways". They were both hits (although not as big as "Burning Love") and were exactly the type of songs Elvis started singing in 72-73; "You Gave Me A Mountain", "It´s Over", etc etc. Vegas January 1973 would have been a perfect time to include them in his set.

Re: Burning Love

Fri Sep 23, 2005 8:06 pm

Mark Nicholson wrote:I don't think it was a case of Elvis disliking Burning Love - according to Ernst's Life In Music book he was unconvinced of it's potential despite everyone insisting he should record it. Maybe JD interpreted that initial reluctance as a personal dislike...

As said in the first post!


Ernst might have been on to something here.

At the time when Elvis did the March 1972 sessions, here's how Elvis' US singles ranked (from summer 1970 to early 1972):

1970:

THE WONDER OF YOU - #9
I'VE LOST YOU - #32
YOU DON'T HAVE TO SAY YOU LOVE ME - #11

1971:

I REALLY DON'T WANT TO KNOW - #21
WHERE DID THEY GO LORD/RAGS TO RICHES - #33
LIFE - #53
I'M LEAVIN' - #36
IT'S ONLY LOVE - #51

1972:

UNTIL IT'S TIME FOR YOU TO GO - #40

When one considers the fact that Elvis hadn't had a Top 10 hit in two years (and a Top 20 hit in two years), and that the recent '71 single releases were not doing well on the charts, it's very understandable that he had doubts as to if "Burning Love" was gonna be a hit.
Fortunately, for all of us, he went ahead and recorded "Burning Love".
And as they say, the rest is history ...

Tom (from Ohio)

Re: Burning Love

Fri Sep 23, 2005 8:36 pm

hounddawgs6499 wrote:At the time when Elvis did the March 1972 sessions, here's how Elvis' US singles ranked (from summer 1970 to early 1972):

1970:

THE WONDER OF YOU - #9
I'VE LOST YOU - #32
YOU DON'T HAVE TO SAY YOU LOVE ME - #11

1971:

I REALLY DON'T WANT TO KNOW - #21
WHERE DID THEY GO LORD/RAGS TO RICHES - #33
LIFE - #53
I'M LEAVIN' - #36
IT'S ONLY LOVE - #51

1972:

UNTIL IT'S TIME FOR YOU TO GO - #40

When one considers the fact that Elvis hadn't had a Top 10 hit in two years (and a Top 20 hit in two years), and that the recent '71 single releases were not doing well on the charts, it's very understandable that he had doubts as to if "Burning Love" was gonna be a hit.


One would think that anyone would see that the songs he had come out with in the previous two years paled in comparison. "Burning Love" was a bonafide rocker; whereas the songs listed were not even close.

Fri Sep 23, 2005 8:49 pm

I agree with KHoots. If 'Burning Love' was not going to get him back to the top of the charts then what was? Also, considering the quality that resulted from the recording sessions of 1970/71 the single line-up above does not look a strong one. Good songs but nowhere near the quality of 'Burning Love'

Was 'Life' an A side single? I'd rate that as nothing more than filler.

Re: Burning Love

Fri Sep 23, 2005 9:18 pm

Mark Nicholson wrote:according to Ernst's Life In Music book he was unconvinced of it's potential despite everyone insisting he should record it. Maybe JD interpreted that initial reluctance as a personal dislike...

As said in the first post!


My point of the post...i feel JD has been misquoted.


(bit like my spelling :oops: )

Sat Sep 24, 2005 2:25 am

iamhekev,

Read up on Burning Love in Peter's book. Based on my memory of the book, put off recording the song, and finally did a handfull of takes to satisfy whoever was pushing it on him. As stated above, I'm wondering if it wasn't just his mood at the time...


bpd

Sat Sep 24, 2005 10:24 am

The single choices for 1971 were extremely odd. "I'm Leavin'" was a beautiful performance but the anthithesis of anything commercial.

"Where Did They Go Lord" didn't really have a hook. "Rags to Riches" was old fashioned. "Life" was just absolutely positively terrible. Other than a misguided notion that the song might hook on with the philosophical singer/songwriter crowd, there was no reason why this should have been a single release. In fact, it might have been better to just stick this song in the can. "It's Only Love" had the most hit potential but there was something slight about it. These records stopped the momentum of the comeback cold.

The extraordinary blues of "I Really Don't Want to Know" received much more acceptance though than its chart success would indicate with something like 700,000 in sales. The bluesy quality of this track might have actually made it too good for airplay.

I'm not sure what spurred the other choices though as they clearly were not Elvis' best shots.

I understand the motivation of "Until it's Time For You to Go". That's a song that like "I'm Leavin'" might have suffered from being too adventurous with a molasses like melody married to a somewhat mysterious lyric. Although, as a composition it is recognized today as a classic, Elvis' #40 is the best that song ever did on the pop chart. It's a song that seems to have strong appeal to musicians but little for the general public.

I have also wondered why "Separate Ways" and "Always on My Mind" didn't make the act despite their commercial success (on the pop charts for the former and the country chart the latter) and the fact that they like "You Gave Me a Mountain" reflected Elvis' mood. They may have been too personal. With "You Gave Me a Mountain" there was some distance and fussing of the details. Even more it was a remake. "Separate Ways" was clearly a record about Elvis and Priscilla. (Although in the best spirit of the time, the lyric was general enough that fans could see their own experiences.) Also, these numbers were a little lowkey for the stage show which thrived on spectacle.