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Concert Recordings

Tue Aug 23, 2005 6:32 pm

Excuse me for being a little dim, but when we hear talk of soundboard recordings, what is the other way?

If I were to make a recording of me singing in the pub, I would go from the "Tape Out" of the mixer (soundboard) to a minidisc player (in the old days that would be tape).

So what differentiates a soundboard recording from a "proper" concert recording?

I'm puzzled. :?

Re: Concert Recordings

Tue Aug 23, 2005 6:39 pm

Keggyhander wrote:Excuse me for being a little dim, but when we hear talk of soundboard recordings, what is the other way?

If I were to make a recording of me singing in the pub, I would go from the "Tape Out" of the mixer (soundboard) to a minidisc player (in the old days that would be tape).

So what differentiates a soundboard recording from a "proper" concert recording?

I'm puzzled. :?


A soundboard mixes the sound of all microphones i.e. instruments and voices to be heard in the concert hall. This can be recorded and usually is for the artist to listen to if he/she thinks any mistakes were made.

A proper concert recording means the show is recorded professionally with each instrument and voice recorded on a separate track so in a recording studio when mastering for (compact) disc they can make a nice stereo image.

Wed Aug 24, 2005 12:01 am

On a soundboard recording you will have the levels on various instruments and voices "as is" directly from the mixer. That means that you can not adjust them afterwards, besides some equalizing. On a multi-track recording you can adjust the levels on instruments and voices afterwards. The levels on the mixerboard are adjusted to fit the venue where the concert is, which sometimes means that some instruments are more in the background or more upfront on a recording than heard by the audience. Normally this means that the drums are sometimes more in the background on the soundboards than "live" and that the voices are higher than "live".