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James Burton Solo Album

Mon Aug 08, 2005 10:17 am

This weekend i Got James Burtons solo album from 1971, The Guitar Sounds of JB. It says it was recorded during a session in whiche EP should have recorded, but cancelled. Now they had booked the studio and therfor someone (Felton Jarvis perhaps) had the idea, thar tewhy just as welle could cut an album...I think it is the rest of the TCB-band, Charlie McCoy and the Sweet Inspirations who are backing JB up. Anyone outthere who knows anything more specific on this subject?

Re: James Burton Solo Album

Mon Aug 08, 2005 10:39 am

kkn wrote:This weekend i Got James Burtons solo album from 1971


It could have very easily been recorded in early 1971 when some of Elvis' sessions were cancelled because of eye problems.

Mon Aug 08, 2005 11:01 am

Yes I am aware of that. But I think it could be interesting to know a litte more about the session and the musicians. I think it is very likely that it could be the TCB-band and other regulars form EP's sessions.

Mon Aug 08, 2005 11:04 am

You are probably right. However, this is an album that I am really not familiar with. Hopefully, someone can shed more light on this.

Do you have a tracklist from the album?

Mon Aug 08, 2005 11:16 am

Here's the tracklisting.

1 Polk Salad Annie (3:36)
2 Suzie-Q (2:25)
3 Fire and Rain (3:30)
4 Fools Rush In (2:38)
5 Johnny B. Goode (2:21)
6 I Know (You Don't Want Me No More) (2:35)
7 Delta Lady (2:51)
8 Mystery Train (3:22)
9 Rock and Raunch (2:25)
10 Hound Dog (2:24)
11 Hi-Heel Sneakers (2:39)
12 Long Reach (2:03)

I believe it was the May 1971 session that was cancelled due to Elvis' eye problems. The rest of the band are not credited but I think it's a safe bet that it was the Nashville crew slated to do the Elvis session.

Re: James Burton Solo Album

Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:06 pm

kkn wrote:This weekend i Got James Burtons solo album from 1971, The Guitar Sounds of JB. It says it was recorded during a session in whiche EP should have recorded, but cancelled. Now they had booked the studio and therfor someone (Felton Jarvis perhaps) had the idea, thar tewhy just as welle could cut an album...I think it is the rest of the TCB-band, Charlie McCoy and the Sweet Inspirations who are backing JB up. Anyone outthere who knows anything more specific on this subject?

I don't think that it was the so-called "TCB-band". Actually that band didn't play together with Elvis in the studio until 1976, did they? More likely it was the regular Nashville set-up of musicians.

Re: James Burton Solo Album

Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:07 pm

see-see-rider wrote:I don't think that it was the so-called "TCB-band". Actually that band didn't play together with Elvis in the studio until 1976, did they? More likely it was the regular Nashville set-up of musicians.


Didn't the TCB band play on the 1972 studio cuts?

Jules

Re: James Burton Solo Album

Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:13 pm

familyjules wrote:
see-see-rider wrote:I don't think that it was the so-called "TCB-band". Actually that band didn't play together with Elvis in the studio until 1976, did they? More likely it was the regular Nashville set-up of musicians.


Didn't the TCB band play on the 1972 studio cuts?

No.

Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:25 pm

Jules:

In fact, the band we now know as the TCB Band only played for Elvis together once in the studio, and that was the February 1976 session at Graceland. In March 1972 Emery Gordy played bass, and in March 1975 it was Duke Bardwell, although his bass parts wer later overdubbed. At the October 1976 session Glenn Hardin had been replaced by Tony Brown. At this time, however, it could be argued that Elvis' current live band were in the studio with him. This line up also appeared at the January 1977 sessions in Nashville, but there was one drawback - Elvis failed to show.

Mon Aug 08, 2005 1:27 pm

Very interesting tracklisting!
Well, in Elvis On Tour we can see Elvis recording "Separate Ways" and also in This Is Elvis "Always On Mind" with Ronnie Tutt, Glen Hardin, The Stamps...but I canĀ“t recall seeing James Burton or Jerry Scheff.
I think this March 1972 session had the TCB band.

Mon Aug 08, 2005 2:20 pm

i must say that when listening to the album it sounds very much like the regular tour-band. Polk Salad for instance sounds a lot like....well yes, Polk Salad only without EP singing...

Mon Aug 08, 2005 3:42 pm

Wasn't this session held right after Elvis' aborted March 1971 session? A safe bet then would be to assume the musicians to be the same as on that particular date.

Re: James Burton Solo Album

Mon Aug 08, 2005 3:54 pm

see-see-rider wrote:
familyjules wrote:
see-see-rider wrote:I don't think that it was the so-called "TCB-band". Actually that band didn't play together with Elvis in the studio until 1976, did they? More likely it was the regular Nashville set-up of musicians.


Didn't the TCB band play on the 1972 studio cuts?

No.


Uh...I meant "more or less" the same band.

Jules

Mon Aug 08, 2005 5:22 pm

If you're referring to the March 27-29, 1972 sessions...by looking at the booklet that came with the 70s Masters box set it does, in fact, list most of the members of the TCB Band as having played on those sessions:

Guitar: James Burton
Guitar: John Wlkinson
Guitar: Charlie Hodge
Bass: Jerry Scheff
Drums: Ronnie Tutt
Piano: Glen Hardin
Vocals: Kathy Westmoreland
Vocals: The Sweet Inspriations
Vocals: J.D. Sumner & The Stamps Quartet

Mon Aug 08, 2005 7:32 pm

Tony:

Both Ernst Jorgensen and Joe Tunzi in their books state that bass was played by Emory Gordy at these sessions.

Mon Aug 08, 2005 8:33 pm

Stephen Butler wrote:Tony:

Both Ernst Jorgensen and Joe Tunzi in their books state that bass was played by Emory Gordy at these sessions.



Ahh....I see. So, the 70s Masters booklet is wrong?

Mon Aug 08, 2005 8:35 pm

I bought James' CD in 2000 and brought it to the Chicago appearance of "Elvis The Concert," hoping for it to be autographed. I had the good fortune of getting backstage, and while holding the CD, James was talking to one of the technicians.

Presumably, he was discussing the CD with the tech, because out of nowhere he pointed to the disc in my hand and said, "Hey, that's it right there." He then came over and asked me where I got it, etc. I was surprised that he had not seen the CD up to that point, but he was very cordial in talking to me about it, and was excited to see it. I offered to give it to him, but he said I could keep it--thank God. I then said, "Since I am going to hang on to it, would you please sign it?" And, he did. Sign it, James!

Mon Aug 08, 2005 11:20 pm

The same thing happened to me when i had a chat with James and took this cd for him to sign. He seemed amazed to see it, and took it over to show another guy before he very kindly signed it for me.

Nice album too.

Mon Aug 08, 2005 11:58 pm

Firstly, the album was made using an abortive Elvis studio booking. Made on Elvis' dime so to speak.

It was the touring band - James Burton would not have appeared as a matter of course with the Nashville band.

By all accounts the band was well lubricated - and it shows!.

Not a great album - no special arrangements or flair - it is like they are virtually playing their stage back-up.

Tue Aug 09, 2005 1:13 pm

Tony:

I trust that the 70's masters booklet is in error, presumably a lack of research on their part. It is simply a matter of its being outvoted by Jorgensen and Tunzi, both of whom would have done their own independent research into the sessions at the time of writing their books.

Tue Aug 09, 2005 5:31 pm

"By all accounts the band was well lubricated - and it shows!.

Not a great album - no special arrangements or flair - it is like they are virtually playing their stage back-up." - said by Kiwi Allan...I think this sums up the feeling of the album very well.

Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:51 am

James Burton himself mentions David Briggs and Charlie McCoy

http://www.bestofneworleans.com/dispatc ... feat3.html

Wed Aug 10, 2005 4:12 pm

I just ordered this from Half.com if anyone is looking for it (they had a few over there).

Thu Aug 11, 2005 11:31 am

Scott Hayward wrote:Wasn't this session held right after Elvis' aborted March 1971 session? A safe bet then would be to assume the musicians to be the same as on that particular date.

Scott is correct. The Burton session in March 1971 came as a result of Elvis developing a serious eye problem, causing Presley's work to stop after two days.

It's a shame, as Elvis had laid down some very nice, folk-influenced tunes like "Early Morning Rain" and "(That's What You Get) For Lovin' Me." One imagines a whole record would've been superior to Love Letters From Elvis.

James, Felton and the assembled musicians stuck around for the next three or four days of booked time to cut his instrumental album.

DJC