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cc rider

Tue Jun 28, 2005 4:42 am

can anyone tell me what the cc stands for or means? Was it a name?

thanks.

Tue Jun 28, 2005 5:00 am

"C.C. Rider" is a county circuit rider, aka a travelling preacher. Burt Lancaster's character in the 1960 film "Elmer Gantry" could be termed a "C.C. Rider."

DJC

Tue Jun 28, 2005 5:02 am

ty :)

Tue Jun 28, 2005 7:05 am

this might seem like a real dumb one to the more educated Elvis fan, but why do most RCA/BMG releases list C.C. Rider as See See Rider? :oops:

Tue Jun 28, 2005 8:53 am

Minkahed -

Different versions of the song by different artists have had variations in the spelling over the years.

RCA/BMG have settled on See See Rider for the Elvis one.

Tue Jun 28, 2005 9:08 am

Thanks for the clarification Colin!!!

Tue Jun 28, 2005 10:27 am

Also in changing the words to another meaning, even though they sound the same, there could be a cut into the publishing for the artist, considering it's the title and mentioned quite often in the song it may be quite likely that this would have been accepted.

Tue Jun 28, 2005 9:33 pm

It's a bit like the song Stagger Lee... I've seen it listed as Stag O Lee Blues on some releases when I googled it once!

Tue Jun 28, 2005 10:13 pm

You may be onto something here. On Elvis' releases, this is just credited to "traditional", which means it is in the public domain and no royalties are warranted, yet the true credit for this song on albums other than Elvis' is usually "Gertrude Rainey/L. Arant". HMMMMMMMMMMMM............

Greg

"Also in changing the words to another meaning, even though they sound the same, there could be a cut into the publishing for the artist, considering it's the title and mentioned quite often in the song it may be quite likely that this would have been accepted."

Tue Jun 28, 2005 11:21 pm

I understand that the first well known recording was by Ma Rainey in 1925 as See See Rider with a chart position of 12.

Recorded by Chuck Willis in 1957 as C.C. Rider - a top ten hit. This most likely the version (but not the title) that inspired Elvis. Mr Willis changed the name to claim royalties.

RCA went back to the original name to avoid paying royalties - wouldn't you!

Tue Jun 28, 2005 11:27 pm

drjohncarpenter wrote:"C.C. Rider" is a county circuit rider, aka a travelling preacher. Burt Lancaster's character in the 1960 film "Elmer Gantry" could be termed a "C.C. Rider."

DJC


Are you sure about this?

The lyrics suggest that CC Rider is female

Lyrics for: C.C. Rider

Well now see, C. C. Rider
Well now see, see what you have done
Well now see, C. C. Rider
Well now see, see what you have done
Well you made me love you woman
Now your man has come

So I'm goin' away now baby
And I won't be back till fall
I'm goin' away now baby
And I won't be back till fall
Just might find me a good girl
Might not be comin' back at all

Well now see, C. C. Rider
See now the moon is shining bright
Well now see, C. C. Rider
See now the moon is shining bright
Just might find me that good girl
And everything would be alright

Tue Jun 28, 2005 11:58 pm

Well they don't suggest C.C. Rider is female throughout, but in someplaces that the C.C. Rider is the reason that the singer finds that woman:

Just might find me that good girl

(Hasn't yet, but thanks to the C. C. Rider he just might)

Anyway, are these the original lyrics or are these more the adapted lyrics by Elvis ?

Wed Jun 29, 2005 9:27 am

I think these are the original lyrics as the original lyrics suggest the woman is a prostitute! "Well you made me love you woman
Now your man has come" (The man being the pimp!)....."If I find me a good girl"..."I won't be back at all".

Elvis changes it to "Well you made me love you but now your loving man has gone". For obvious reasons. :D

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:11 am

I don't think it's about any prostitute. It's just a woman who cheats on her man. So a good woman would be one who doesn't cheat. A C.C. Rider could be a man who took advantage of the women in the audience even if they were married. Maybe he would be back to preach there again and maybe not. If he found a good woman he might settle down and not be a C. C. Rider anymore.

So I think the song tells both sides of the story. It tells the story about the C.C. Rider and he also tells his story. Therefore it can be sung by both women and men without changing it.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:26 am

1 - The easy rider, also known as see see rider or c c rider (see also rider), is a blues metaphor for the sexual partner. Originally it referred to the guitar hung on the back of the traveling bluesman. The word easy has different meanings for the female and male lover: applied to a woman it is an expression of admiration but applied to a male it usually carries the meaning of reckless and unfaithful;
2 - According to Alex Washburn "In one Alan Lomax' folk song collections it says that the abbreviation "C.C." means "Cavalry Corporal" and that they had no female soldiers at that time (19th century). Now the conclusion from this fact was that the singer or the original songwriter must have been a gay... Well, in my opinion the songwriter even could be a woman singing this song to her soldier lover. Anyway, the author then said that "C.C.Rider" became "See See Rider" and "Easy Rider" because of prudery...". Thanks to Alex Washburn;
3 - Southern Louisiana's John "JohnnyB" Bradford says: "An easy rider is the husband or significant other of a whore - thus the name. He doesn't work or pay for sex. It's his easily. Thanks to John "JohnnyB" Bradford for this contribution to the list
__________
This phrase can be found in:
Big Bill Broonzy, C C Rider (1) & C C Rider (2), Ma Rainey, Jelly Bean Blues & See See Rider
Mississippi John Hurt, See See Rider, New! Bessie Smith, Rocking Chair Blues

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:31 am

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-
/B000001DJC/qid=1120033842/sr=8-3/ref=pd_bbs_ur_
3/002-5091190-0717622?v=glance&s=music&n=507846
Scroll down to disc 3 and you can listen to a clip of an early version of Easy Rider by Ledbelly.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 11:47 am

Interesting interpretations and definitions.Probably other explanations would be just as useful today,because the previous meanings belong to certain cultural,geographical,social and even economic traditions.

May I add a fourth definition ? Since the 50's C C Rider has come to denote the rider of a motorcycle.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 12:38 pm

Here in Holland we've had a commercial with this song in it. The commercial is from some brand of orange soda,which is called Sisi.
So they sing Sisi Rider and you see a guy in a small car with three wheels. So the song is aout soda guys.

just kidding ofcourse :wink:

Wed Jun 29, 2005 1:23 pm

Mark Nicholson wrote:It's a bit like the song Stagger Lee... I've seen it listed as Stag O Lee Blues on some releases when I googled it once!


And also as Stack O Lee.

Jules

Wed Jun 29, 2005 2:06 pm

there's a mechanic term: cubic centimeters

motorcycle engines are measured by CC's

1200cc engine

a "cc rider" would mean your transportation is obviously a motorcycle - and not a car.

Wed Jun 29, 2005 2:40 pm

Graceland Gardener wrote:there's a mechanic term: cubic centimeters

motorcycle engines are measured by CC's

1200cc engine

a "cc rider" would mean your transportation is obviously a motorcycle - and not a car.


Why so? Car engines are also commonly measured in cc.

But do our transAtlantic cousins measure engine capacities in cc? Wouldn't that be a little too modern for them?

Wed Jun 29, 2005 2:42 pm

Smellbinder, what the hell are talking about?

Wed Jun 29, 2005 5:36 pm

A lot of interesting posts here, but I believe the Doc is correct. In the original version of the song by Ma Rainey she's singing to/about her lover, a country (or county) circuit preacher, who loved then left her. It's a very old song, and may have been 'floating around' in country-blues circles even before Ma Rainey's version.

In Elvis' version the 'See See Rider' seems to be an unfaithful woman who the man is going to leave ("Oh see, see see rider oh see what you have done ...... now, but now, but now your lovin' man has gone"; " well I'm goin' goin away baby and I won't be back 'til fall ... if I find me a good girl I won't, I won't, I won't be back at all."). In this scenario 'See See Rider' would be a euphemism for the gal's acts of infidelity. The shameless hussy got what she deserved!

Professor Pete Dube
Illicet sex euphemism scholar

Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:38 pm

Pete Dube wrote:In this scenario 'See See Rider' would be a euphemism for the gal's acts of infidelity. The shameless hussy got what she deserved!


Amen!

:evil:

Jules

Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:47 pm

Pete Dube wrote:A lot of interesting posts here, but I believe the Doc is correct. In the original version of the song by Ma Rainey she's singing to/about her lover, a country (or county) circuit preacher, who loved then left her. It's a very old song, and may have been 'floating around' in country-blues circles even before Ma Rainey's version.



But if this was the case.............why did Ma Rainey name her song See See Rider and not CC?