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Engelbert Talks Sideburns

Thu Jun 23, 2005 9:29 pm

Most humorous thing I have read all day.

Talking of his image, Enge wants to set the record straight about Elvis.

"He didn't copy my image at all. The truth of the matter is this: I put my sideburns on in 1965...that's prior to Elvis, he did it in about 1972," says Humperdinck, who like Elvis was an important mainstay of Las Vegas clubs.
He pinpoints the source of the confusion: "When he finally wore that famous white jumpsuit of his, an artist sketched him in it and presented it to him on a TV show...and he said, 'Hell, that's not me, that's Engelbert Humperdinck.'"


Elvis put his sideburns on in 1972 ????
He gotta be kidding!
And that is a film called That's The Way It Is and not a TV show.



http://tinyurl.com/9vtd2

Thu Jun 23, 2005 9:33 pm

That is funny. Least we not forget that EP had sideburns has early as 1954, (though not the porkchop kind). Also Enge sideburns were frickin gross.

Thu Jun 23, 2005 9:42 pm

Who the heck put out there that Elvis copied Arnold George Dorsey's [his real name] image in the first place?

And another quote: "I took the sideburns off for a while and nobody recognises me so I quickly put them back." :roll:

Fri Jun 24, 2005 1:03 am

Not for nothing, but I do think ol' 'Bert was wearing those super-size mutton chops by something like '66 or '68, and bigger than anything Elvis would wear until maybe '69.

In either case, 'Hump' did wear them by the late '60s and they were pretty big at that.

By the way, EH is a guilty pleasure as dear old Mom liked him and Elvis. I watched him do "Such A Night" on a TV concert. It was rather pedestrian, but it seemed like he was paying tribute to Elvis, as I think he may have mentioned it. Singing a relatively forgotten hit song like that, I suppose it had to be tribute.
Last edited by Gregory Nolan Jr. on Fri Jun 24, 2005 4:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Fri Jun 24, 2005 3:40 am

The one and only performance I have ever witnessed in the Las Vegas Hilton showroom was an Englebert concert in 1989.

I had the opportunity to visit "Enj" (as his buddies call him) in his dressing room. Or should I say, Elvis' dressing room. I don't remember much of what transpired. I was too busy trying to take in every detail of the space that Elvis occupied so often.

Fri Jun 24, 2005 7:49 am

I've seen a few of Engelbert's concerts, and he is definitely a troubadour ... at the age of 69, he still tours, releases new material, and changes up his show. He's no Elvis, but a seasoned veteran of 5 decades of packing 'em in. The last tickets I purchased were for May 05, and the tickets sold out in 2 days at a 5000 seat venue.... a second show was added and sold out as well. True, we were probably 20 years younger than the rest of the crowd, but who cares?
I often regret that Elvis didn't have the chance to experience the longevity of Engelbert, Paul Anka, or Tom Jones.

I'd never take shots at someone who has survived for so many years ... he even had an Emmy nod last year for his gospel album ... how many of today's chart toppers will have successful carees 40 years from now?

The "Such a Night" reference was from a 1995 LA Forum concert, and the dvd extra comments were made in 2003 as a bonus feature.
Engelbert discusses his career, and mentions most of the vegas legends, like Sammy, Tom, Bing, etc. He then grows wistful re Elvis, using the word mentor to describe their relationship. He says that Elvis was a master showman who taught him much by watching his vegas performances.
On the sideburns, he says it was around 1967, and Elvis supposedly said, if they look good on you, they'll look good on me.
Then Elvis grew the muttonchops.
Probably an embellished story, as most celebrities embellish their Elvis recollections.
What was obvious is that Elvis is Engelbert's favourite performer, and he gives Elvis his due as a mentor ... I thought this was an apt term, as most performers have gone to school by studying Elvis' showmanship.

Fri Jun 24, 2005 1:15 pm

Is`nt old Eng supposed to have the biggest active fan club of any entertainer in the world ?

Fri Jun 24, 2005 2:44 pm

Thanks for clarifying.
I thought EH was talking about sideburns in general.
Now I know that it's muttonchops and that I done him wrong. :(

He used to be a guilty pleasure of my late Grandfather.
First time ever I heard renditions of "Green,Green Gras Of Home" and "Release Me".

And you gotta applaud that he gives credit where credit is due.

How often did Enge meet Elvis?
There is at least one photo of them together.

Fri Jun 24, 2005 4:20 pm

Well stated, TCB Ted.

At his best, Englebert has a strong, romantic male voice of the like Elvis employed on things like "Hurt," "It's Midnight," "It Hurts Me," and other "adult" material.

I believe they both recorded "Please Release Me," "Green, Green Grass of Home," and perhaps a few others. However, few are willing to get past the mawkishness of much the Englebert persona - or rather his fanbase. It's worth trying. His late '60s and early '70s work is of a nature that I can hum the song and then insert Elvis' voice and imagine his version. Not everyone is so easy to do that for.

When I saw how 'Hump' has been able to soldier on in his 60s, I realized that Elvis might have done so as well. Tom Jones, who takes his shots here often, is another who reminds me that Elvis could have still been out there, or alternatively, along the lines of the late Johnny Cash's American recordings.

I tend to feel had Elvis lived, he might have embraced his edgier Sun persona and had hipsters flocking to bring him back to his artistry, rather than the scarve-throwing, Vegas route....Oh, well.

Fri Jun 24, 2005 4:28 pm

Gregory Nolan Jr. wrote:When I saw how 'Hump' has been able to soldier on in his 60s, I realized that Elvis might have done so as well. Tom Jones, who takes his shots here often, is another who reminds me that Elvis could have still been out there, or alternatively, along the lines of the late Johnny Cash's American recordings.

Greg,

The thing with Tom though is that he had someone around him (his Son) who said "Your image is dated and ridiculous! Ditch the medallions, tight pants and sequinned shirts and start listening to and recording some contemporary material".

Next thing Tom's in the studio with 'Art of Noise' recording 'Kiss'. He's then appearing on TV in a cool sober all black get-up with shades. That was 25 years ago and he's never looked back. I'm not sure Elvis had that person in his entourage who could have kick-started that process. :(

hump

Fri Jun 24, 2005 4:41 pm

Isn't the Hump a bit of a whining old fruit as our guy is the King of Rock and Roll?

Re: hump

Fri Jun 24, 2005 9:15 pm

Hammer wrote:Isn't the Hump a bit of a whining old fruit as our guy is the King of Rock and Roll?


In his autobiography published earlier this year, he apologizes to his wife for giving in to the temptations of the road hundreds of times in his youth ... he even gave his wife an entire chapter to contribute to her point of view of being married to a celebrity. On his most recent dvd, he tours his country estrate, walking you through his home, his gardens, his english courtyard complete with many outbuildings, including a fully stocked ,authentic pub. He walks you up to a restored XJ6 Jag from the 60's, explaining that it was his dear, blessed parent's vehicle, and he's quite emotional.
You then see him surprise his wife while she's gardening .... he's very proud that he's kept a family together against impossible odds .... he screwed up, his wife was in it for the long haul, and now that they're older, they are enjoying the wisdom of their patience. His daughter, Louise, is also part of his business empire.
These people are living proof of the "what ifs" that we're all fond of asking re Elvis, his entourage, his dad, and his wife ... its an interesting dvd to watch if you're an Elvis fan.
If your'e truly a fan of all genre's of music, as was Elvis, then you can appreciate an artist of Eng's ilk who has maintained a three range octave for 40 years .... I agree that he isn't 50's Elvis cool, but Elvis was closer in style to Eng by the 70's than you may have considered .... he has his own class and style, something above a "whining old fruit".

Re: hump

Fri Jun 24, 2005 10:07 pm

TCB TED wrote:If your'e truly a fan of all genre's of music, as was Elvis, then you can appreciate an artist of Eng's ilk who has maintained a three range octave for 40 years .... I agree that he isn't 50's Elvis cool, but Elvis was closer in style to Eng by the 70's than you may have considered .... he has his own class and style, something above a "whining old fruit".


I'm definately not a 50's Elvis fan only......as a matter of fact I love his post 68 period the best......and I collect as much of that period as I can.
But even in this period Elvis is a rocker for me.....IMO he lived the ultimate rock and roll life.....way more then anyone I can think of.....he did it all.
IMO Elvis stand for rebellion.........guys like Engelbert, although very talented are far from that.........also Tom Jones (whom I do love BTW) has nothing to do with RnR

........so

Fri Jun 24, 2005 10:08 pm

........that probably means I'm not a fan of all kinds of music indeed :wink:

Re: hump

Fri Jun 24, 2005 10:45 pm

Hammer wrote:
IMO Elvis stand for rebellion.........guys like Engelbert, although very talented are far from that.........also Tom Jones (whom I do love BTW) has nothing to do with RnR



I think a lot of that "Elvis as Rebel" thing is overstated anyway. No doubt he was one once (think 1954-1958), and whenever he wanted to don that mantle again, such as in 1968, but he transcended such limitations.

He was proud to be an entertainer, and so too grew out of and beyond being simply "the King of Rock'n'Roll."

Probably to a fault, to be sure, because in reality, the Presley persona was very much at home in the same sentence as Tom Jones, Englebert Humperdink and other "adult" performers of the '70s Vegas circuit.

Sat Jun 25, 2005 12:40 pm

I have never thought Elvis stood for rebellion at any time. How could a guy who took members of his family with him where ever he went (Germany etc) be a "rebel"?

Elvis was a lot better than some phoney rebel image, he was just himself.

..

Sun Jun 26, 2005 1:50 pm

I only ment to say that for he he is the symbol of change of popular music in the 50's.........and he seemed like a guy who did whatever he wanted.....which to me is what being non-conform is about.........though you can also say he was a slave to Col P......but that's just not how I look at it.

Elvis (and some other musicians in his time) changed history which is something guys like Engelbert and Tom never ever did

But I agree with you that saying Elvis was just a rebel, doesn't describe the man fully........to me he is bigger then life